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Q :

Which one is performance wise : to clear a string builder

AStringBuilder.Remove(0,AStringBuilder.Length);

string theString = AStringBuilder.ToString();
ABuilder.Replace(theString,String.Empty);

AStringBuilder.Length = 0;

Note : I use Framework 3.5 which doesn't contain Clear() method.

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Why not measure it an come to a conclusive answer? –  vcsjones Jan 23 '12 at 15:39
    
Why not AStringBuilder.Clear() ? –  Andrew Cox Jan 23 '12 at 15:40
    
framework 3.5 . –  just_name Jan 23 '12 at 15:40
    
Whats wrong in using Clear() –  V4Vendetta Jan 23 '12 at 15:41
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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Update It turns out that you are using .net 3.5 and Clear was added in .net 4. So you should use Length = 0. Actually I'd probably add an extension method named Clear to do this since it is far more readable, in my view, than Length = 0.


I would use none of those and instead call Clear.

Clear is a convenience method that is equivalent to setting the Length property of the current instance to 0 (zero).

I can't imagine that it's slower than any of your variants and I also can't imagine that clearing a StringBuilder instance could ever be a bottleneck. If there is a bottleneck anywhere it will be in the appending code.

If performance of clearing the object really is a bottleneck then you will need to time your code to know which variant is faster. There's never a real substitute for benchmarking when considering performance.

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hmmm, framework 3.5. –  just_name Jan 23 '12 at 15:40
1  
@just_name Use Length = 0. That's all that Clear is doing anyway. –  vcsjones Jan 23 '12 at 15:41
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Before .NET 4: As David Heffernan mentiones, use Length = 0;

In .NET 4: Other option: StringBuilder.clear();

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.text.stringbuilder.clear.aspx

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Since Clear() is not available for you I think setting the Length to Zero is more faster. Some benchmarks

One more link from SO

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That's what Clear() does: this.Length = 0; –  ssg Jan 23 '12 at 15:58
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The best optimization towards such a problem would be to eliminate the need to clear the StringBuilder in the first place. The quickest idea is to check the necessity to clear early and build with new content instead of clearing it in the middle. That would be the most performant option. That might require some design changes but I think it would be worth the effort.

Let me clarify my point: I assume you have a huge code that passes around a single StringBuilder, that requires "clear" because "the whole story changes" somewhere in the middle of the processing. Here is our example:

var sb = new StringBuilder();
a(sb);
b(sb); // clears sb depending on a condition
c(sb);
return sb.ToString();

All these functions call numerous other functions. And here is what b() looks like:

void b(StringBuilder sb) 
{
  bool result = checkForSomeCondition();
  if(result)
  {
    sb.Clear();
    sb.Append("something else");
  }
}

now if you had called checkForSomeCondition at the beginning of your main code, you would not have to "clear" in the first place because you could organize the code as:

var sb = new StringBuilder();
bool result = checkForSomeCondition();
if(result)
{
  sb.Append("something else");
}
else 
{
  a(sb);
}
c(sb);
return sb.ToString();

As you can see we changed the structure and sequence of the code and eliminated the need for a clear operation. Not only we eliminated the need for clear, we also eliminated the unnecessary, redundant building of the string and other possible time consuming operations.

There is still a catch though: b() could have been dependent on a() in the first place. Then what do we do? Here is what we do:

This is the single biggest reason why MVC (Model-View-Controller) pattern exists. MVC pattern separates two concerns, "building of sb" and "executing business logic" into two different, isolated components so you don't have to "clear" your StringBuilder.

Instead of passing around a StringBuilder, you first collect the required data:

var result = new Result();
a(result);
b(result);
c(result);

and then render the results into a formatted string:

return result.ToString(); // contains logic to put everything in a string

This way you don't tie yourself to the "serial, one-way" logic of a StringBuilder. You build up your results in a completely native-feeling class and do not care about how output is built.

Later, the .ToString() implementation of your model could use StringBulder, or a StringWriter, or whatever it likes to generate the necessary output, without any need for Clearing the StringBuilder output, which could be the biggest performance weakness.

I can imagine that your code might be much bigger, much more complex. But MVC pattern presents a very simple idea, "do not mix formatting logic with business logic". This kind of programming approach eliminates serious performance problems and it makes your code more readable too. Everybody wins.

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U mean : StringBuilder st = new StringBuilder(); then later : st = new StringBuilder(); !! –  just_name Jan 23 '12 at 16:01
1  
no i mean check for a need to clear early, so you don't need to clear. let me add that to my answer. –  ssg Jan 23 '12 at 16:06
    
Example please ,if possible –  just_name Jan 23 '12 at 16:09
1  
@just_name: see my edit. –  ssg Jan 23 '12 at 16:20
1  
Really thank u so much for your great explanation. –  just_name Jan 23 '12 at 16:34
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You can create a new one:

new StringBuilder()
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