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I need to generate random string for my automated tests. I use the following Chinese custom class to do it.

public class UniqueIdGenerator
  {
    static public string GenerateUniqueId(int idLength)    // generates uniqueID for all fields (0-175 characters)
    {
      string uniqueID = "";
      string initialID = Guid.NewGuid().ToString().Remove(35);

      if (idLength <= 35)
      {
        uniqueID = Guid.NewGuid().ToString().Remove(idLength);
      }
      if (idLength > 35 & idLength <= 70)
      {
        uniqueID = initialID + Guid.NewGuid().ToString().Remove(idLength - 35);
      }
      if (idLength > 70 & idLength <= 105)
      {
        uniqueID = initialID + initialID + Guid.NewGuid().ToString().Remove(idLength - 70);
      }
      if (idLength > 105 & idLength <= 140)
      {
        uniqueID = initialID + initialID + initialID + Guid.NewGuid().ToString().Remove(idLength - 105);
      }
      if (idLength > 140 & idLength <= 175)
      {
        uniqueID = initialID + initialID + initialID + initialID + Guid.NewGuid().ToString().Remove(idLength - 140);
      }

      return uniqueID;
    }

How can I simplify it to use for any natural number?

share|improve this question
3  
Why would you want to alter the actual length / value of a GUID?? –  DJ KRAZE Jan 23 '12 at 16:09
    
It looks to me that you should have else if on each of those conditional tests after the first one, since they cannot all be true at any one time. –  Samuel Slade Jan 23 '12 at 16:10
1  
A GUID is never to long, nor is it too short. It's 128 bits long precise as it means to. –  vidstige Jan 23 '12 at 16:12
    
Please read more about guids here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Globally_unique_identifier –  vidstige Jan 23 '12 at 16:13
    
I need to insert it to fields on web form which could have different maximum length. –  algot Jan 23 '12 at 16:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try the following:

var builder = new StringBuilder();
while(builder.Length < idLength) 
{
  builder.Append(Guid.NewGuid().ToString());
}
return builder.ToString(0, idLength);

If all you require is a method capable of generating garbage for testing purposes, then perhaps the following would be more suitable:

private static Random Random = new Random();
public static string GenerateRandomString(int length, string characterSet = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ")
{
    var builder = new StringBuilder();
    while(builder.Length < length) 
    {
        builder.Append(characterSet.Chars[Random.Next(characterSet.Length)]);
    }
    return builder.ToString();
}

As an aside, when randomising values for tests, I prefer to still give my properties descriptive names as I find that the fail messages are generally far more helpful. I use an extension method for this purpose:

private static Random Random = new Random();
public static string Randomise(this string value)
{
  return value + Random.Next();
}

Which is the useable in my tests like so:

var customer = new Customer { Id = "CustomerId".Randomise() };

This may not be applicable in this case, since a string of a given length is required, however it does save a bit of time if/when a test fails.

share|improve this answer
    
You just beat me to it. ;) –  ZombieSheep Jan 23 '12 at 16:13
    
'System.Guid.NewGuid()' is a 'method', which is not valid in the given context –  algot Jan 23 '12 at 16:15
1  
@algot you need builder.Append(Guid.NewGuid().ToString()); –  Oskar Kjellin Jan 23 '12 at 16:21

This is a very bad idea and you should not do this.

First off, you say that you need a random string, but guids are guaranteed to be unique, not random. Guids can be generated randomly, or they can be generated based on the current time, or they can be generated by assigning a range of guids to a particular machine and then generating them sequentially. There are any number of ways that you can generate unique identifiers, and only some of them are random. Guids make no guarantee of being random, so if you need randomness, you are using the wrong tool.

Second, you can't just take parts out of a guid and expect it to still be unique, any more than you can find the part of the airplane that "does the flying" and expect it to fly without the other parts of the airplane attached to it.

If you need a globally unique identifier then make a guid. It might not be random, but it will be unique. It does not need to be any longer, so do not add anything to it. It must not be shorter, otherwise it is no longer guaranteed to be unique

If you need a random string then get a source of randomness -- either pseudo-random or crypto strength, as required -- and generate random characters from the alphabet of your choice, and string them together. You can predict its likelihood of being unique by performing a "birthday problem" collision analysis on it. An inexact but close-enough computation is: take the number of possible characters in the alphabet. Raise that to the power of half the length of the string. That is the number of strings you have to generate before it becomes likely that you've generated at least one string twice.

For example, if you have an alphabet of 0123456789ABCDEF, then that's 16 characters. If the string is 12 letters long, then compute 166. That's about a 16 million, so you're going to run into high likelihood of generating the same string twice in the first 16 million strings generated.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this enlightening and expansive explanation! It's easy to say "don't do it", but it's refreshing when someone actually goes to the extra 3 minutes' effort to explain why. I'm sure we've all had "good idea" moments like OP's, and we all need a guiding hand on our shoulder to keep us from implementing them! –  Jesse Smith Jan 23 '12 at 18:20
    
Main purpose of it to generate unique e-mails for testing login to site. Length of string before '@' is 15 characters. I think possibility of e-mail duplication is very low. –  algot Jan 24 '12 at 8:24

If you want a random string of arbitrary length that is hex characters, you could use:

    public static string GetRandomString(int length)
    {
        var rng = new RNGCryptoServiceProvider();
        var padded = (int)Math.Ceiling(length / 2.0m);
        var bytes = new byte[padded];
        rng.GetBytes(bytes);
        return bytes.Aggregate(new StringBuilder(), (f, s) => f.AppendFormat("{0:X2}", s)).ToString(0, length);
    }
share|improve this answer

Note : A GUID with a user-defined length is no longer a GUID.

That said, if you want to generate a string that resembles a GUID of a given length, try something like the following (untested) code.

string myMethod(int length)
{
    StringBuilder myGuidLikeString = new StringBuilder();
    while(myGuidLikeString.Length < length)
    {
        myGuidLikeString .Append(Guid.NewGuid.ToString());
    }
    return myGuidLikeString.ToString(0,length);
}

Oops - rich.okelly beat me to it with an almost identical method.

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