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I aim to make an index of all files with a particular extension and store it into index.txt. I am getting all the right results but not getting the 'files' onto the new line, this is a snapshot of my code:

OutputStream f0 = new FileOutputStream("index.txt");
    String ind[] = f.list(only); // logic for getting only relevant files
        for(int i=0;i<ind.length;i++)
        {
            File n = new File(path + "/" +ind[i]);
                System.out.println(ind[i]+ " is a " +exten +" file");
                ind[i]+="\n";           // doesnt work      
                f0.write(ind[i].getBytes());    // here i am writing the filenames                              
        }           

is it due to the getBytes() function which overlooks the "/n" ? Please tell me what to do. I want to insert a new line everytime i exit the for loop.

One major edit: I am getting the desired result when I open the file with notepad++ or wordpad, but when i open the file with notepad i am getting the results on the same line. Please Explain this too!

share|improve this question
    
can anyone explain the anomaly with the various results i am getting of the same file? – Purushottam Jan 23 '12 at 17:36
1  
notepad only reads one type line separator. That's why, it seems to be all in one line. – Jaxedin Jan 23 '12 at 23:41
    
@Purushottam "can anyone explain the anomaly with the various results i am getting of the same file?" Please have a look at my answer below for a clarification concernint newlines/carriagereturns across platforms. – Unai Vivi Jan 30 '12 at 11:01

Try writing:

System.getProperty("line.separator") 

instead of \n

share|improve this answer

Instead of using an FileOutputStream I'd use a PrintWriter.

PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter("index.txt");
String ind[] = f.list(only); // logic for getting only relevant files
for(int i=0;i<ind.length;i++)
{
    File n = new File(path + "/" +ind[i]);
    System.out.println(ind[i]+ " is a " +exten +" file");
    out.println(ind[i]);   
}
share|improve this answer

There is a missing assumption here.

  1. If you assume that your text file should have MS Windows line separators (meant for Windows platforms), then you should use \r\n.
  2. If you assume that your text file should have Unix-like line separators (meant for GNU/Linux, AIX, Xenix, Mac OS X, FreeBSD, etc.), then you should use \n.
  3. If you assume that your text file should have Mac oldschool line separators (meant for Mac OS up to version 9, Apple II family, OS-9, etc.), then you should use \r.
  4. If you assume that your text file should have line separators of the kind of the platform your program is run from, then you should use System.getProperty("line.separator") (or print the new line with a .println()).
share|improve this answer

Is there any reason you are working at such a low level of I/O in Java? First of all you should be using Writers instead of OutputStreams.

And then if you use PrintWriter you can do away with the getBytes piece:

PrintWriter f0 = new PrintWriter(new FileWriter("index.txt"));

And then later...

f0.print(ind[i]);

And finally to your question, outside the loop simply

f0.println();

share|improve this answer

try this,

FileWriter.write("\r\n");
share|improve this answer
    
Which is obviously only correct on Windows like platforms and certainly not what you want on Mac or *nix.. – Voo Jan 26 '12 at 12:30

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