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So I was working on a way to lazily generate primes, and I came up with these three definitions, which all work in an equivalent way - just checking whether each new integer has a factor among all the preceding primes:

primes1 :: [Integer]
primes1 = mkPrimes id [2..]
  where mkPrimes f (x:xs) = 
          if f (const True) x 
          then 
            let g h y = y `mod` x > 0 && h y in
            x : mkPrimes (f . g) xs
          else
            mkPrimes f xs

primes2 :: [Integer]
primes2 = mkPrimes id (const True) [2..]
  where mkPrimes f f_ (x:xs) = 
          if f_ x 
          then 
            let g h y = y `mod` x > 0 && h y in
            x : mkPrimes (f . g) ( f $ g $ const True) xs
          else
            mkPrimes f f_ xs

primes3 :: [Integer]
primes3 = mkPrimes [] [2..]
  where mkPrimes ps (x:xs) = 
          if all (\p -> x `mod` p > 0) ps
          then 
            x : mkPrimes (ps ++ [x]) xs
          else
            mkPrimes ps xs

So it seems to me primes2 should be a little faster than primes1, since it avoids recomputing f_ = f (const True) for every integer (which I think requires work on the order of the number of primes we've found thus far), and only updates it when we encounter a new prime.

Just from unscientific tests (running take 1000 in ghci) it seems like primes3 runs faster than primes2.

Should I take a lesson from this, and assume that if I can represent a function as an operation on an array, that I should implement it in the latter manner for efficiency, or is there something else going on here?

share|improve this question
    
(as I'm sure you know by now) in primes3 here calling all is an enormous overkill - taking only primes not above sqrt of x is sufficient - thus same primes list can be used which is being built - the function becomes simple filter: primes4=2:filter(\x->all((/=0).(rem x))$takeWhile((<=x).(^2))primes4)[3,5..], running at about O(n^1.45) empirically, in n primes produced - all three versions in your question look quadratic - no matter how you build your functions they still test by all primes instead of only those below the sqrt x. –  Will Ness Mar 6 '12 at 20:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

What's the second argument to the f's needed for? In my opinion, both of these alternatives are more readable, and don't significantly impact performance...

...
            let g y = f y && y `mod` x > 0 in
            x : mkPrimes g xs
...

import Control.Arrow  -- instance Monad (-> r)
import Control.Monad  -- liftM2
(.&&.) = liftM2 (&&)
...
            let g y = y `mod` x > 0 in
            x : mkPrimes (f .&&. g) xs
...


Anyhow, back to the question. Sometimes using functions as data structures is the best representation for a certain task, and sometimes not. "Best" in terms of ease-of-coding and "best" in terms of performance are not always the same thing. The "functions as data structures" technique is essential to runtime compilation, but as that page warns,

Runtime compilation can sometimes win you significant efficiency gains, but can often win you almost nothing at the cost of the your increased stress and reduced productivity.

In your case, it's likely that the overhead of constructing each f :: Integer -> ... -> Bool is significantly higher than the overhead of constructing each ps :: [Integer], with little or no difference when calling f ... x versus all ... ps.


To squeeze cycles out of the infinite prime sieve, get rid of the calls to mod! Integer multiplication, division, and modulus are much slower than integer addition and subtraction. On my machine, this implementation clocks in at 40% faster when calculating the first 1000 primes (GHC 6.10.3 -O2).

import qualified Data.Map as M
primes' :: [Integer]
primes' = mkPrimes 2 M.empty
  where
    mkPrimes n m = case (M.null m, M.findMin m) of
        (False, (n', skips)) | n == n' ->
            mkPrimes (succ n) (addSkips n (M.deleteMin m) skips)
        _ -> n : mkPrimes (succ n) (addSkip n m n)
    addSkip n m s = M.alter (Just . maybe [s] (s:)) (n+s) m
    addSkips = foldl' . addSkip

In action (using a bit of JSON-ish syntax),

   mkPrimes 2 {}
=> 2 : mkPrimes 3 {4: [2]}
=> 2 : 3 : mkPrimes 4 {4: [2], 6: [3]}
=> 2 : 3 : mkPrimes 5 {6: [2, 3]}
=> 2 : 3 : 5 : mkPrimes 6 {6: [2, 3], 10: [5]}
=> 2 : 3 : 5 : mkPrimes 7 {8: [2], 9: [3], 10: [5]}
=> 2 : 3 : 5 : 7 : mkPrimes 8 {8: [2], 9: [3], 10: [5], 14: [7]}
=> 2 : 3 : 5 : 7 : mkPrimes 9 {9: [3], 10: [2, 5], 14: [7]}
=> 2 : 3 : 5 : 7 : mkPrimes 10 {10: [2, 5], 12: [3], 14: [7]}
=> 2 : 3 : 5 : 7 : mkPrimes 11 {12: [2, 3], 14: [7], 15: [5]}
...

the map keeps track of future multiples, using nothing but addition.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This is the kind of detailed answer I was hoping for. –  rampion May 22 '09 at 19:26
    
just a sidenote: this can be significantly improved by delaying the addition of each prime into the map until that prime's square is seen in the input, as seen e.g. here in Python. also compare stackoverflow.com/a/13895347/849891 . –  Will Ness Dec 20 '12 at 17:12

Note that primes3 can be made more efficient by changing ps++[x] to (x:ps). The running (++) is linear in the length of its left argument, but constant in the length of the right argument.

share|improve this answer
3  
Actually, that was intentional. 2 is a factor much more often than 173 is, so we get more early exits when checking for primality when we start from the small end than from the large end. –  rampion May 23 '09 at 3:03

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