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EDIT: I don't know what distro it is, it's in an exam paper.

I'm just not getting this, sadly. I'm quite happy with Row level triggers but could someone explain to me how the results would differ if the trigger was statement level instead?

Relation/Statement Trigger/Row Level Trigger

Employee(ID VARCHAR2(30), Salary NUMBER)


Create Trigger AutoRaise
After insert on Employee
Referencing new table as NT
update Employee
Set salary = salary + (select avg(salary) from NT)


Create trigger AutoRaise
After insert on Employee
Referencing new table as NT
For each Row
Update employee
Set salary = salary + (select avg(salary) from NT)

I understand that in the for each row trigger it'll fire for each row affected by the triggering statement. Now would the statement level trigger modify the results differently? Say if I inserted five tuples in one statement, would it set the salary etc for them all? If so, what's the benefit of the row level trigger here?

I've tried searching but I just can't get my head around it.

Thanks,

EDIT: Now, I'm just being dense but would either trigger produce different outputs? For the statement level trigger if I used the example values:

In table before trigger's creation:

(A,50)

Added in ONE statement after trigger is created:

(B,70), (C,30)

The first trigger would set the salary for each tuple being inserted, surely? So the first would become 120 (as the average is 50, 70 + 50 = 120) and the second would become 80. If this is true, how does the second trigger differ in results?

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2  
WHAT database system and which version are you talking about?? SQL is just the Structured Query Language - a language used by many database systems - SQL is NOT a database product... stuff like this is very often vendor-specific - so we really need to know what database system you're talking about .... –  marc_s Jan 23 '12 at 17:02
    
VARCHAR2 seems to indicate that it's Oracle. But yet the syntax is not valid because there is no such thing as referencing new table as... and begin/end is also missing. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 23 '12 at 17:49
    
Unfortunately this is from a past exam paper so no specific distro is mentioned. –  Mo Moosa Jan 23 '12 at 20:32
    
DB2 seems to support the REFERENCING bit. –  Andriy M Jan 24 '12 at 9:07

1 Answer 1

The difference is that in case of statement level trigger SELECT avg(salary) FROM NT will return average of salary for inserted rows, but in case of row level, avg(salary) always equals to salary of new record (trigger executed for each row individually). Also, statement level trigger will be executed if no records affected. In case of row level trigger most RDMS don't fire it when 0 records affected.

Side note. I believe the trigger bodies in the question are given for example only; otherwise, I'd recommend not using recursion in triggers even if particular RDMS has such an option.

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Hi, thanks for the reply. Now, I'm just being dense but would either trigger produce different outputs? For the statement level trigger if I used the example values: In table before trigger's creation: (A,50) Added in ONE statement after trigger is created: (B,70), (C,30) The first trigger would set the salary for each tuple being inserted, surely? So the first would become 120 (as the average is 50, 70 + 50 = 120) and the second would become 80. If this is true, how does the second trigger differ in results? –  Mo Moosa Jan 23 '12 at 23:18
1  
For the second trigger (row level) it will be different : 1st row (B,70) inserted : 70 + avg(70) = 140. Second row inserted (30) : 1st row (140 +30) = 170, second 30+30 = 60. Row trigger will be executed twice, for each row NEW_TABLE will have 1 record. –  a1ex07 Jan 23 '12 at 23:43
    
Also, it's very likely that in case of row level trigger you will get an error (or you need to add some logic that handles recursion level if RDMS allows recursion in trigger) because it attempts to modify the same table. –  a1ex07 Jan 23 '12 at 23:57
    
and some databases such as SQl server do not have row level triggers because they are a terrible idea. –  HLGEM Jun 9 '14 at 20:49
    
ANd if you do recursion, you could get into trouble if too many rows are updated in one statement. –  HLGEM Jun 9 '14 at 20:57

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