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I have a collection of strings in c#, for example;

var example = new string[]{"c", "b", "a", "d"};

I then with to sort this, but my IComparer method is not working, and looping infinitely by the seems of things.

Basically I need "b" to come first, followed by "c", then I dont care about the order of any of the others.

Is this possible using IComparer<string> and the Compare(string x, string y) method?

Edit: Code

    public int Compare(string x, string y)
    {
        var sOrder = new string[] { "b", "c" };
        int index_x = -1;
        int index_y = -1;

        for (int i = 0; i < sOrder.Length;i++)
        {
            if (sOrder[i] == x)
                index_x = i;
            else if (sOrder[i] == y)
                index_y = i;
        }

        if (index_x >= 0 && index_y >= 0)
        {
            if (index_x < index_y)
            {
                return -1;
            }
            else
                return 1;
        }
        return 0;
    }
share|improve this question
    
Yes, it is possible. We'll need to see your code in order to tell you why it isn't working... – Cody Gray Jan 23 '12 at 17:19
    
Ok there's still a lot more information missing here. What happens to strings that do not have one character in them? Do you want to enforce this ordering on strings or individual characters? etc... – Jeff Mercado Jan 23 '12 at 17:24
up vote 9 down vote accepted

This should do what you want:

var example = new string[]{"c", "a", "d", "b"};
var comparer = new CustomStringComparer(StringComparer.CurrentCulture);
Array.Sort(example, comparer);

...

class CustomStringComparer : IComparer<string>
{
    private readonly IComparer<string> _baseComparer;
    public CustomStringComparer(IComparer<string> baseComparer)
    {
        _baseComparer = baseComparer;
    }

    public int Compare(string x, string y)
    {
        if (_baseComparer.Compare(x, y) == 0)
            return 0;

        // "b" comes before everything else
        if (_baseComparer.Compare(x, "b") == 0)
            return -1;
        if (_baseComparer.Compare(y, "b") == 0)
            return 1;

        // "c" comes next
        if (_baseComparer.Compare(x, "c") == 0)
            return -1;
        if (_baseComparer.Compare(y, "c") == 0)
            return 1;

        return _baseComparer.Compare(x, y);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Kind of right. I the first line of Compare() needs if (x==y) return 0; – maxp Jan 23 '12 at 17:46
    
@maxp, good point, I fixed it (as well as a few other things) – Thomas Levesque Jan 23 '12 at 18:19
    
Doesn't this do a stackoverflow? You should have wrote if(x==y)return 0; instead of if (_baseComparer.Compare(x, y) == 0) return 0;, which would result in recursion. Correct me if I am wrong! – WoIIe Aug 29 '14 at 11:39
    
-- Please ignore the comment above ^^ – WoIIe Aug 29 '14 at 11:47

A simple way is to substitute integers for the strings.

class MyComparer : IComparer<string>
{
    public int Compare(string x, string y)
    {
        int ix = x == "b" ? 0 : x == "c" ? 1 : 2;
        int iy = y == "b" ? 0 : y == "c" ? 1 : 2;
        return ix.CompareTo(iy);
    }
}

var example = new List<string> { "c", "b", "a", "d", "foo", "", "1", "e"};
example.Sort(new MyComparer());
foreach (var s in example)
    Console.WriteLine(s);

Output:

b
c

1
e
a
d
foo

Note that this isn't a stable sort. If you need a stable sort, there's a little more work involved.

share|improve this answer
    
With the same comparer, Linq's OrderBy does a stable sort: var ordered = example.OrderBy(s => s, new MyComparer());. But in the case you might as well say .OrderBy(s => s == "b" ? 0 : s == "c" ? 1 : 2) directly (although I don't like nesting ?: operators). – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 2 '13 at 18:35
    
@JeppeStigNielsen: great point, thanks! – Igby Largeman Jul 3 '13 at 3:18

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