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This isn't homework for me, it's a task given to students from some university. I'm interested in the solution out of personal interest.

The task is to create a class (Calc) which holds an integer. The two methods add and mul should add to or multiply this integer.

Two threads are set-up simultaneously. One thread should call c.add(3) ten times, the other one should call c.mul(3) ten times (on the same Calc-object of course).

The Calc class should make sure that the operations are done alternatingly ( add, mul, add, mul, add, mul, ..).

I haven't worked with concurrency related problems a lot - even less with Java. I've come up with the following implementation for Calc:

class Calc{

    private int sum = 0;
    //Is volatile actually needed? Or is bool atomic by default? Or it's read operation, at least.
    private volatile bool b = true;

    public void add(int i){
        while(!b){}
        synchronized(this){
                sum += i;
            b = true;   
        }
    }

    public void mul(int i){
        while(b){}
        synchronized(this){
            sum *= i;
            b = false;  
        }
    }

}

I'd like to know if I'm on the right track here. And there's surely a more elegant way to the while(b) part. I'd like to hear your guys' thoughts.

PS: The methods' signature mustn't be changed. Apart from that I'm not restricted.

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2  
You can use AtomicBoolean & AtomicInteger instead. –  CoolBeans Jan 23 '12 at 17:41
    
@AviramSegal - to elaborate: It's 1 thread calling mul() ten times in a row. Not ten threads each calling mul(). –  s3rius Jan 23 '12 at 17:46
    
Thread safe or not, anybody who uses boolean in this way as an assignment for students should be keelhauled. Field name b. Great, just great. –  owlstead Jan 23 '12 at 18:04
    
@owlstead Ah well, I'd never name a boolean like that. But for the sample code is so short that I felt it wasn't really needed. Ab(using) a boolean as a kind of switch is pretty ugly too, but then again I really only cared about the thread-safety part. –  s3rius Jan 23 '12 at 20:05
    
Although I do understand the requirements of brevity, I do see a lot of new devs that seem to take over this kind of brevity, and I do have to live with the code they produce. But excuse me for getting this off-topic. The point kind of is that even if it is thread safe, it's not the way to go. –  owlstead Jan 23 '12 at 22:31
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7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

volatile is needed otherwise the optimizer might optimize the loop to if(b)while(true){}

but you can do this with wait and notify

public void add(int i){

    synchronized(this){
        while(!b){try{wait();}catch(InterruptedException e){}}//swallowing is not recommended log or reset the flag
            sum += i;
        b = true;   
        notify();
    }
}

public void mul(int i){
    synchronized(this){
        while(b){try{wait();}catch(InterruptedException e){}}
        sum *= i;
        b = false;  
        notify();
    }
}

however in this case (b checked inside the sync block) volatile is not needed

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1  
I would use notifyAll, just in case the requirement changes and you could have several adding and/or multiplying threads (in which case you would have a deadlock). –  JB Nizet Jan 23 '12 at 17:53
    
Have you got any references to support the statement about optimizing away things that aren't volatile? I understood it to be more about visibility... or is that part of the same issue? any links to help be better understand would be much appreciated :) –  Toby Jan 26 '12 at 13:42
    
@Toby check this blog post –  ratchet freak Jan 26 '12 at 14:09
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Try using the Lock interface:

class Calc {

    private int sum = 0;
    final Lock lock = new ReentrantLock();
    final Condition addition  = lock.newCondition(); 
    final Condition multiplication  = lock.newCondition(); 

    public void add(int i){

        lock.lock();
        try {
            if(sum != 0) {
                multiplication.await();
            }
            sum += i;
            addition.signal(); 

        } 
        finally {
           lock.unlock();
        }
    }

    public void mul(int i){
        lock.lock();
        try {
            addition.await();
            sum *= i;
            multiplication.signal(); 

        } finally {
           lock.unlock();
        }
    }
}

The lock works like your synchronized blocks. But the methods will wait at .await() if another thread holds the lock until .signal() is called.

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and who goes first? –  ratchet freak Jan 23 '12 at 17:48
    
If you modify your example to include two Conditions (to handle the alternation of operations) I will upvote. –  Perception Jan 23 '12 at 17:50
    
Hmm, I'm not sure that using the same signal variable is thread-safe. There may a scenario in which the thread calling add will signal allowAccess and then reacquire the lock itself and find it signalled. –  Tudor Jan 23 '12 at 17:50
    
You mean because the addition has to go first? I forgot that bit. –  Jivings Jan 23 '12 at 17:50
    
@Perception Edited to use two conditions. –  Jivings Jan 23 '12 at 17:52
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What you did is a busy loop: you're running a loop which only stops when a variable changes. This is a bad technique because it makes the CPU very busy, instead of simple making the thread wait until the flag is changed.

I would use two semaphores: one for multiply, and one for add. add must acquire the addSemaphore before adding, and releases a permit to the multiplySemaphore when it's done, and vice-versa.

private Semaphore addSemaphore = new Semaphore(1);
private Semaphore multiplySemaphore = new Semaphore(0);

public void add(int i) {
    try {
        addSemaphore.acquire();
        sum += i;
        multiplySemaphore.release();
    }
    catch (InterrupedException e) {
        Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
    }
}

public void mul(int i) {
    try {
        multiplySemaphore.acquire();
        sum *= i;
        addSemaphore.release();
    }
    catch (InterrupedException e) {
        Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
    }
}
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I think the ReentrantLock version is just slightly more comprehensible. That said, this one seems to be more clear regarding the initial state and might be more adaptable, so +1 you go. –  owlstead Jan 23 '12 at 18:12
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As others have said, the volatile in your solution is required. Also, your solution spin-waits, which can waste quite a lot of CPU cycles. That said, I can't see any problems as far as correctness in concerned.

I personally would implement this with a pair of semaphores:

private final Semaphore semAdd = new Semaphore(1);
private final Semaphore semMul = new Semaphore(0);
private int sum = 0;

public void add(int i) throws InterruptedException {
    semAdd.acquire();
    sum += i;
    semMul.release();
}

public void mul(int i) throws InterruptedException {
    semMul.acquire();
    sum *= i;
    semAdd.release();
}
share|improve this answer
    
We had exactly the same idea! –  JB Nizet Jan 23 '12 at 18:02
    
@JBNizet: Yes, but you were quite a bit quicker to arrive at this solution (I spent quite a bit of time tinkering with other primitives before deciding that semaphores were the best solution to this.) –  NPE Jan 23 '12 at 18:04
    
So? development is not a speed contest. I would have lost big time if it was. Unfortunately, in more ways than other, stackoverflow is. –  owlstead Jan 23 '12 at 22:36
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Yes, volatile is needed, not because an assignment from a boolean to another is not atomic, but to prevent the caching of the variable such that its updated value is not visible to the other threads who are reading it. Also sum should be volatile if you care about the final result.

Having said this, it would probably be more elegant to use wait and notify to create this interleaving effect.

class Calc{

    private int sum = 0;
    private Object event1 = new Object();
    private Object event2 = new Object();

    public void initiate() {
        synchronized(event1){
           event1.notify();
        }
    }

    public void add(int i){
        synchronized(event1) {
           event1.wait();
        }
        sum += i;
        synchronized(event2){
           event2.notify();
        }
    }

    public void mul(int i){
        synchronized(event2) {
           event2.wait();
        }
        sum *= i;
        synchronized(event1){
           event1.notify();
        }
    }
}

Then after you start both threads, call initiate to release the first thread.

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Of course, there aren't actually any guarantees of progress in the Java specs. / I believe the synchronized is unnecessary here./ But busy wait? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 23 '12 at 17:47
    
+1 for the chaching issue. I've read about it before, but completely forgot. –  s3rius Jan 23 '12 at 17:54
    
@s3rius: I've made an edit with some code using wait and notify. To me this seems much more clear. –  Tudor Jan 23 '12 at 18:01
    
sum doesn't have to be volatile because it's protected by synchronized blocks (as long as it's read inside such a block). –  pron Jan 23 '12 at 20:14
    
@pron, Yes you are right. –  Tudor Jan 23 '12 at 20:16
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Hmmm. There are a number of problems with your solution. First, volatile isn't required for atomicity but for visibility. I won't go into this here, but you can read more about the Java memory model. (And yes, boolean is atomic, but it's irrelevant here). Besides, if you access variables only inside synchronized blocks then they don't have to be volatile.

Now, I assume that it's by accident, but your b variable is not accessed only inside synchronized blocks, and it happens to be volatile, so actually your solution would work, but it's neither idiomatic nor recommended, because you're waiting for b to change inside a busy loop. You're burning CPU cycles for nothing (this is what we call a spin-lock, and it may be useful sometimes).

An idiomatic solution would look like this:

class Code {
    private int sum = 0;
    private boolean nextAdd = true;

    public synchronized void add(int i) throws InterruptedException {
        while(!nextAdd )
            wait();
        sum += i;
        nextAdd = false;
        notify();
    }

    public synchronized void mul(int i) throws InterruptedException {
        while(nextAdd)
            wait();
        sum *= i;
        nextAdd = true;
        notify();
    }
}
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Question - would there be a difference between while(!b) wait(); and if(!b) wait(); ? –  s3rius Jan 23 '12 at 19:01
1  
@s3rius Yes. You must always test a monitor condition (one that you wait() for) in a while loop. There are two reasons for this. First, you don't know why the thread was woken up (with notify() or notifyAll()). Maybe it was because the condition you're testing has changed, and maybe for another reason. Second, on some hardware/OS architectures there can be spurious thread wakeups, i.e. wakeups for no good reason at all. This, I believe, doesn't happen in most architectures, but still, the idiom remains: you must always test a condition you wait on in a while loop. –  pron Jan 23 '12 at 20:11
    
That clarifies it, thanks. –  s3rius Jan 23 '12 at 21:03
    
+1 for your description of spurious wake ups and the need to loop the condition check :) –  Toby Jan 26 '12 at 13:45
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The program is fully thread safe:

  1. The boolean flag is set to volatile, so the JVM knows not to cache values and to keep write-access to one thread at a time.

  2. The two critical sections locks on the current object, which means only one thread will have access at a time. Note that if a thread is inside the synchronized block, no thread can be in any other critical sections.

The above will apply to every instance of the class. For example if two instances are created, threads will be able to enter multiple critical sections at a time, but will be limited to one thread per instances, per critical section. Does that make sense?

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But it can be improved. Which was the question. –  Jivings Jan 23 '12 at 17:53
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