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I had an interesting problem this morning. I had a base class that looked like this:

# base.py
class Base(object):

    @classmethod
    def exists(cls, **kwargs):
        # do some work
        pass

And a decorator module that looked like this:

# caching.py

# actual caching decorator
def cached(ttl):
    # complicated

def cached_model(ttl=300):
    def closure(model_class):
        # ...
        # eventually:
        exists_decorator = cached(ttl=ttl)
        model_class.exists = exists_decorator(model_class.exists))

        return model_class
    return closure

Here's my subclass model:

@cached_model(ttl=300)
class Model(Base):
    pass

Thing is, when I actually call Model.exists, I get complaints about the wrong number of arguments! Inspecting the arguments in the decorator shows nothing weird going on - the arguments are exactly what I expect, and they match up with the method signature. How can I add further decorators to a method that's already decorated with classmethod?

Not all models are cached, but the exists() method is present on every model as a classmethod, so re-ordering the decorators isn't an option: cached_model can add classmethod to exists(), but then what makes exists() a classmethod on uncached models?

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1  
So, what's the solution? It's not clear. It would have been much better had you left your question as it was, and posted an answer. –  Marcin Jan 23 '12 at 19:25
1  
You can post a question and answer it yourself, but please keep question and answer separate. See meta.stackexchange.com/questions/17463/… –  delnan Jan 23 '12 at 19:25
    
I think you forgot a @classmethod in class Base. –  Rik Poggi Jan 23 '12 at 19:35
    
@RikPoggi, asked the explicit question, fixed missing decorator - thanks –  Andrew Roberts Jan 23 '12 at 19:40

2 Answers 2

In Python, when a method is declared, in a function body, it is exactly like a function - once the class is parsed and exists, retrieving the method through the "." operator transforms that function - on the fly - into a method. This transform does add the first parameter to the method (if it is not an staticmethod) -

so:

>>> class A(object):
...    def b(self):
...        pass
... 
>>> A.b is A.b
False

Becasue each retrieving of the "b" attribute of "A" yields a different instance of the "method object b"

>>> A.b
<unbound method A.b>

The original function "b" can be retrieved without any trasnform if one does

>>> A.__dict__["b"]
<function b at 0xe36230>

For a function decorated with @classmethod just the same happens, and the value "class" is added to the parameter list when it is retrieved from A.

The @classmethod and @staticmethod decorators will wrap the underlying function in a different descriptor than the normal instancemethod. A classmethod object - which is what a function becomes when it is wrapped with classmethod is a descriptor object, which has a '__get__' method which will return a function wrapping the underlying function - and adding the "cls" parameter before all the other ones.

Any further decorator to a @classmethod has to "know" it is actually dealing with a descriptor object, not a function. -

>>> class A(object):
...    @classmethod
...    def b(cls):
...       print b
... 
>>> A.__dict__["b"]
<classmethod object at 0xd97a28>

So, it is a lot easier to let the @classmethod decorator to be the last one to be applied to the method (the first one on the stack) - so that the other decorators work on a simple function (knowing that the "cls" argument will be inserted as the first one).

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True, but sometimes you don't have control over the order of the decorators. In my case, the method is always a classmethod, but only some classes have the additional caching decorator - it's subclass-specific. In that case, you need a way to 'undo' the first classmethod decorator. See my answer for what I ended up going with. –  Andrew Roberts Jan 24 '12 at 16:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The classmethod decorator actually prepends a class argument to calls to the method, in certain circumstances, as far as I can tell, in addition to binding the method to the class. The solution was editing my class decoration closure:

def cached_model(ttl=300):
    def closure(model_class):
        # ...
        # eventually:
        exists_decorator = cached(ttl=ttl, cache_key=exists_cache_key)
        model_class.exists = classmethod(exists_decorator(model_class.exists.im_func))

        return model_class
    return closure

The im_func property appears to get a reference to the original function, which allows me to reach in and decorate the original function with my caching decorator, and then wrap that whole mess in a classmethod call. Summary, classmethod decorations are not stackable, because arguments seem to be injected.

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