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Here's a question I've been racking my brain over. Let's say I have a table that has a series of timestamps and a part number as the primary key. The table stores incremental changes, meaning that for every timestamp, if a field changes, that change is recorded. If the field doesn't change, then for the new timestamp it is NULL. Here's the basic idea.

 part | timestamp | x-pos | y-pos | status
------+-----------+-------+-------+--------
 a5   |       151 |     5 |    15 |      g
 a5   |       153 |  NULL |    17 |   NULL

(part, timestamp) is the primary key. The NULLs in the second record indicate values that are unchanged since the first record.

What I want to be able to do is select the most recent values for each field grouped by the part. For example, given the above entries, the results will be 153,5,17,g for part a5.

As of now, I have this hacked together query.

    ((SELECT x-pos FROM part_changes WHERE x-pos IS NOT NULL
    ORDER BY timestamp DESC
    LIMIT 1)

    UNION

    (SELECT y-pos FROM part_changesWHERE y-pos IS NOT NULL
    ORDER BY timestamp DESC
    LIMIT 1)

    UNION

    (SELECT status FROM part_changes WHERE status IS NOT NULL
    ORDER BY timestamp DESC
    LIMIT 1))

But this returns a single column, meaning that I can use a group-by for organizing.

There's got to be a more elegant way of doing thing, such as using COALESCE or IS NULL in a creative way. But I'm stuck and can't figure it out. Anybody got an idea?

And no, I can't change the database structure.

EDIT: ruakh has the right idea. The only problem now is grouping by part. I can't seem to get around the LIMIT 1 for grouping by multiple parts. Any ideas?

mdahlman, I'm not too familiar with analytic functions in postgresql. So, if that solution would be easier than a complex query, then by all means post your idea.

EDIT 2: Thank you all for the help. I think I've got a good enough grasp of what I need to do.

share|improve this question
1  
You should specify whether analytic functions are allowed. With them, the answer should be simple. Without them... it's gonna be tough. –  mdahlman Jan 23 '12 at 19:53
    
is there a limit how many null value can occur ? If there would be a limit it would be a solution with some left joins .. not nice but it could be done ;) –  rauschen Jan 23 '12 at 20:26
    
I don't think there's a limit. In fact, one of the fields has the vast majority (something like 99%) of records as NULL. –  Bat Masterson Jan 23 '12 at 20:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Rather than using a UNION, it sounds like you really want subqueries in the field list. That is, instead of (SELECT ...) UNION (SELECT ...) UNION (SELECT ...), you want SELECT (SELECT ...), (SELECT ...), (SELECT ...).


For example:

SELECT part,
       ( SELECT x_pos
           FROM part_changes
          WHERE part = pc.part
            AND x_pos IS NOT NULL
          ORDER
             BY timestamp DESC
          LIMIT 1
       ) AS x_pos,
       ( SELECT y_pos
           FROM part_changes
          WHERE part = pc.part
            AND y_pos IS NOT NULL
          ORDER
             BY timestamp DESC
          LIMIT 1
       ) AS y_pos,
       ( SELECT status
           FROM part_changes
          WHERE part = pc.part
            AND status IS NOT NULL
          ORDER
             BY timestamp DESC
          LIMIT 1
       ) AS status
  FROM ( SELECT DISTINCT
                part
           FROM part_changes
       ) AS pc
;

But at this point I would really consider writing a stored procedure.


Alternatively:

SELECT DISTINCT
       part,
       FIRST_VALUE(x_pos) OVER
         ( PARTITION BY part
               ORDER BY CASE WHEN x_pos IS NULL
                             THEN NULL
                             ELSE TIMESTAMP
                         END DESC NULLS LAST
         ) AS x_pos,
       FIRST_VALUE(y_pos) OVER
         ( PARTITION BY part
               ORDER BY CASE WHEN y_pos IS NULL
                             THEN NULL
                             ELSE TIMESTAMP
                         END DESC NULLS LAST
         ) AS y_pos,
       FIRST_VALUE(status) OVER
         ( PARTITION BY part
               ORDER BY CASE WHEN status IS NULL
                             THEN NULL
                             ELSE TIMESTAMP
                         END DESC NULLS LAST
         ) AS status
  FROM part_changes
;
share|improve this answer
    
That appears to have solved one problem. Thanks. However, I'm not sure where the 'group by' would go in order to group by the part number. Any ideas? –  Bat Masterson Jan 23 '12 at 19:58
    
@BatMasterson: That sort of detail will depend on the dialect of SQL. From your use of ORDER BY ... LIMIT 1, I'm guessing you're targeting MySQL; is that correct? (If so -- or if not -- you should edit the tags on your question.) –  ruakh Jan 23 '12 at 20:01
    
Ah, good question. This is postgreSQL. I'll update the post. –  Bat Masterson Jan 23 '12 at 20:03
    
Unless he avoids the limit 1 he is stuck, so I believe this approach is an obfuscation. –  mvrak Jan 23 '12 at 20:24
    
@BatMasterson: I've expanded my answer a bit. –  ruakh Jan 23 '12 at 20:36

For only one part this should give you an answer .. thanks to ruakh

But I dont like this version ..

SELECT 
    (SELECT timestamp  FROM part_changes WHERE part = $part 
    ORDER BY timestamp DESC
    LIMIT 1) as timestamp,

    (SELECT x-pos FROM part_changes WHERE part = $part and x-pos IS NOT NULL
    ORDER BY timestamp DESC
    LIMIT 1) as xpos,

    (SELECT y-pos FROM part_changes WHERE part = $part and  y-pos IS NOT NULL
    ORDER BY timestamp DESC
    LIMIT 1) as ypos,

    (SELECT status FROM part_changes WHERE part = $part and status IS NOT NULL
    ORDER BY timestamp DESC
    LIMIT 1)) as status
share|improve this answer
    
I agree, doing that recursively for each part is a bit rough. –  mvrak Jan 23 '12 at 20:25
    
I suppose I could simply write a function that takes in the part number as an argument, then use this. Thanks. –  Bat Masterson Jan 23 '12 at 20:29

list of relevant timestamps:

select max timestamp from part_changes where x_POS is not null group by part

You can make this a view: lets call this view1

SELECT part_changes.part, part_changes.x-pos 
FROM part_changes left join view1 on part_changes.part = view1.part
WHERE x-pos IS NOT NULL 
 AND part_changes.timestamp = view1.timestamp 
GROUP BY part_changes.part

See where I am going? That should give you the full list for x-pos.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting idea. I thought about using the null-eliminating quality of certain joins to my advantage, but I didn't know where to begin. I'll experiment with this a bit. My only concern is that in my case, there are actually a lot more columns. The example in the post was a simplified version. Would so many joins have a problem with memory? –  Bat Masterson Jan 23 '12 at 20:25
    
If you have a few hundred it might...I also just edited my post to include the group by. Now that I think of it, I think this would give you exactly what you want for x_pos. UNTESTED though! –  mvrak Jan 23 '12 at 20:27
    
I believe there's only about 15 fields, and there's thousands of records per day. I'll try it out. This might be just what I need. –  Bat Masterson Jan 23 '12 at 20:30

ruakh is right. Alternative: Write a user-defined aggregate using SQL-CLR. This aggregate can run bottom-top-top over your rows and remember the first non-null value of each column.

You can also do this in the application. Make your program request rows in sorted order in batches of, say, 10 rows. Aggregate these batches like described above. If after the current batch is done a null-column is there get the next batch.

share|improve this answer
    
SQL-CLR isn't going to help the OP with PostgreSQL. However, it can be done with built-in stuff, and there's an example of exactly what you describe (FIRST) on the PostgreSQL wiki. –  Daniel Lyons Jan 23 '12 at 20:29
    
I wish SQL Server had FIRST. –  usr Jan 23 '12 at 23:05

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