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Is there a way to do the following while using only one data structure?

my %hash = (
  "key1" => "value1",
  "key2" => "value2",
  "key3" => $hash{key1},
);

So basically, I want to set a hash's key value to another key value. I've tried the above syntax but get the following warning:

Global symbol "%hash" requires explicit package name at ...

I'm assuming this is because I'm trying to reference the hash before it's actually been created.

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3  
The answer lies in the error message. No, you can't. –  Linus Kleen Jan 23 '12 at 19:29
    
Do you want $hash{key1} and $hash{key3} to be the same value, i.e. changes to $hash{key1} also visible in $hash{key3} ? –  hochgurgler Jan 23 '12 at 19:35
1  
Not sure why you would need to reference another key value in the same declaration since you already know the value (i.e. "value1"). If you don't want to retype "value1", make it a variable before declaring %hash. –  MisterEd Jan 23 '12 at 19:51
    
@MisterEd Because setting variables related to the hash, outside of it, will make it harder to maintain as there would be many. This needs to be a self contained hash. –  Steve Dickinson Jan 23 '12 at 20:10
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why not make your own function:

use strict;
use warnings;

sub make_hash (@) { 
    my %h;
    my @unresolved;
    while ( @_ ) {
        my ( $key, $value ) = splice( @_, 0, 2 );
        next unless defined $value;
        if (   not ref( $value ) 
           and my ( $ref ) = $value =~ /^ref:\s*(.*\S)\s*$/ 
           ) {
            if ( defined( my $v = $h{ $ref } )) {
                $h{ $key } = $v;
            }
            else {
                push @unresolved, [ $key, $ref ];
            }
        }
        else {
            $value =~ s/^lit://;
            $h{ $key } = $value;
        }
    }
    $h{ $_->[0] } = $h{ $_->[1] } foreach grep { exists $h{ $_->[0] }; } @unresolved;
    return wantarray ? %h : \%h;
} 

To demonstrate some of the power:

my %hash 
    = make_hash(
      'key1' => 'value1'
    , 'key2' => 'value2'
    , 'key3' => 'ref:key1'
    , 'key4' => 'lit:ref:key2'
    , 'key5' => 'lit:lit:ref:key3'
    );

The lit: prefix covers the case of "What if I really wanted to pass a value that is a non-reference as 'ref:so-and-so'? It also is recursive in answering, "What if I direly need to make a value 'lit:xzy'.

I've done this and I've also blessed a reference to a passed piece of data to a Lit class or something along those lines.

sub Ref ($) { bless \shift, 'Ref' }

And then in the make_hash routine you'd just check for ref( $value ) eq 'Ref'. And specify it like the following:

my %hash 
    = make_hash(
      'key1' => 'value1'
    , 'key2' => 'value2'
    , 'key3' => Ref 'key1'
    );

There are many ways to make Perl act like you wish it did.

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This is mostly along the lines of what I am trying to do. But what is a Lit class? Also, if I try your bottom "ref" example I get the following error referring to the "sub Ref": Modification of a read-only value attempted –  Steve Dickinson Jan 25 '12 at 17:32
    
@SteveDickinson, why should you need to modify it? It's a key. you just dereference it to get the hashed value. I don't have a problem in Perl 5.14 as long as I stick to referencing it. –  Axeman Jan 25 '12 at 20:03
    
I wouldn't need to modify it. I was simply stating how the "sub Ref" posted above was behaving. The following corrected sub works for me: sub Ref ($) { my $value = shift; bless \$value, 'Ref' } In addition, I added the following code to the make_hash sub to complete it: ... } else { $value =~ s/^lit://; if (ref($value) eq 'Ref') { $h{ $key } = $h{$$value}; } else { $h{ $key } = $value; } } Thanks for leading me in the right direction. –  Steve Dickinson Jan 26 '12 at 21:07
    
@SteveDickinson, You're welcome. I have so many options for assembling hashes these days that for the most part I use a function like this, but can pass a variety of functions like -stack_duplicate_keys to store different values in a "bucket" under a single key. And my version of Ref can get to deep levels generally with a '.' as delimiter, so like Ref 'key_1.key_2.3.key_4' (with the solo '3' being an index into an array.) –  Axeman Jan 27 '12 at 12:30
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This is because, at the moment of using $hash{key1}, the symbol "hash" was not yet added to the symbol table. Your package doesn't yet know what %hash is, because it won't be added to the symbol table until AFTER the closing ")" is parsed - yet it will encounter the symbol 1 line earlier.

You need to pre-declare %hash in advance:

my %hash;

%hash = (
  "key1" => "value1",
  "key2" => "value2",
  "key3" => $hash{key1},
);

However, while the above will compile, it will NOT work as expected, since nothing has been assigned to %hash yet when $hash{key1} is evaluated. You need to assign it first, as a separate statement:

my %hash;

%hash = (
  "key1" => "value1",
  "key2" => "value2",
);

%hash = %hash, (
  "key3" => $hash{key1},
); # Or simply $hash{key3} = $hash{key1};

Please note that the above merely copies the value from key1 into key3, once. They are in no way linked/associated after that. If you want to alias key1 and key3 (e.g. have them point to the same value, instead of contain a copy of the value), this is possible but not nearly as trivial. You need to make it into a tied hash and write custom tie handlers to get it right, or have each key's value be a reference.

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That gets rid of the warning, however if you were to dump the data it would appear as so: ("key2", "value2", "key1", "value1", "key3", undef) –  Steve Dickinson Jan 23 '12 at 19:36
    
Why the down vote? –  DVK Jan 23 '12 at 19:38
    
@SteveDickinson - which of the 2 versions - the one that I said won't work as expected or the one showing how to fix? –  DVK Jan 23 '12 at 19:38
    
Was there a down vote? I could only see the top solution (which gave the undef) when I replied. The later answer does set the value but I was hoping to set the entire contents of the hash at once. –  Steve Dickinson Jan 23 '12 at 19:54
    
@DVK => you can use Hash::Util::hv_store to have multiple keys point to the same memory without any ties or explicit references. –  Eric Strom Jan 23 '12 at 20:04
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If you want $hash{key1} to be an alias of $hash{key3}, then this can be accomplished easily using Data::Alias.

use Data::Alias;

my %hash = (
    key1 => 'value1',
    key2 => 'value2'
);

alias $hash{key3} = $hash{key1};

$hash{key1} and $hash{key3} will now refer to a single value, and updates to one will be visible in the other.

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+1 for nice non-source-filter module. Beats tie::hash that I was thinking of. –  DVK Jan 23 '12 at 20:31
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You can use the core module Hash::Util to access the low level hv_store routine which can alias values of the hash together. It isn't quite as clean looking as using Data::Alias but it is already installed.

use Hash::Util 'hv_store';

my %hash = (
  key1 => "value1",
  key2 => "value2",
);

hv_store %hash, key3 => $hash{key1};

say "$_: $hash{$_}" for sort keys %hash;
# key1: value1
# key2: value2
# key3: value1

$hash{key1} = 'new value';

say "$_: $hash{$_}" for sort keys %hash;
# key1: new value
# key2: value2
# key3: new value

if you dont want the aliasing to persist past the initial assignment, then you can just write the line:

$hash{key3} = $hash{key1}

after your initial declaration and skip using hv_store.

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2  
+1 for excellent technical point. Virtual -1 because if you have to do that, you better have a really good reason to not redesign your datastructure to be cleaner. –  DVK Jan 23 '12 at 20:30
    
@DVK => I fully agree that this usage of hv_store should be kept away from most sane data-structures, but there are some uses. It came in handy when I was writing metacpan.org/module/Hash::Abbrev for example. –  Eric Strom Jan 23 '12 at 22:09
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%hash doesn't contain anything when creating the list of values to assign to the hash, since you haven't assigned the list to the hash yet.

In fact, %hash doesn't exist when creating the list of values to assign to the hash since assignments evaluate their RHS before their LHS. That's why you're getting a strict error.

Some solutions you might like:

my %hash = (
  key1 => "value1",
  key2 => "value2",
  key3 => "value1",
);


my $value1 = "value1";
my %hash = (
  key1 => $value1,
  key2 => "value2",
  key3 => $value1,
);


my %hash = (
  ( map { $_ => "value1" } qw( key1 key3 ) ),
  key2 => "value2",
);
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You could say

my %h; 
my $i = 0;
while (
    my ( $k, $v ) = ( 
        key1 => '"value1"',
        key2 => '"value2"',
        key3 => '$h{key1}',
    )[ $i, $i + 1 ] 
  )
{
    $h{$k} = eval $v; 
    $i += 2;
}

as long as any keys referred to appear in the list before they are referenced.

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