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So i have click function and i'm calling this function couple times on same div, so basicly i have this kind of div:

<div id="upload_submit" class="upload_submit">Content</div>

and i have two click functions:

    //first function
    $('.upload_submit').click(function(){
        $(this).removeClass('upload_submit');
        $(this).addClass('upload_cancel');
    });
    //second one
    $(".upload_cancel").click(function(){
        alert('test')
    });

So by default my div have class upload_submit after i click on that div i change class to upload_cancel so now if i click again i should get alert but for some reason it doesn't happen, what could be wrong?

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1  
you haven't delegated the events properly, and event binding only happens when the selector matches – zzzzBov Jan 23 '12 at 19:39
up vote 4 down vote accepted

.bind() (which .click is a wrapper around) only binds to elements existing at the time of the call. But you are dynamically changing the class meaning that there is no .upload_cancel to bind to when you try to bind it. Therefore you need a delegated event:

//first function
$(document).delegate('.upload_submit', 'click', function(){
    $(this).removeClass('upload_submit');
    $(this).addClass('upload_cancel');
});
//second one
$(document).delegate('.upload_cancel', 'click', function(){
    alert('test')
});

Or if you are using 1.7+ you can use the .on() syntax:

//first function
$(document).on('click', '.upload_submit', function(){
    $(this).removeClass('upload_submit');
    $(this).addClass('upload_cancel');
});
//second one
$(document).on('click', '.upload_cancel', function(){
    alert('test')
});

What this will do instead is bind a handler to the document element for a click event. It will then check if the triggering element matches your selector you passed in, if it does it will call your handler. This means that you can add and remove elements matching the selector provided and it will still call your click event handler correctly since the event is bound to the document not your specific element.

Here is a jsFiddle example of this solution.

For more information you can start reading this article.

share|improve this answer
    
live is discouraged. Use on if you're using jQuery 1.7.1, or delegate otherwise. – mrlee Jan 23 '12 at 19:41
    
@fuzzyDunlop live is not just discouraged but it will be deprecated. .delegate/.bind are fine though and in my opinion have better api design than .on – Esailija Jan 23 '12 at 19:44

Use the jQuery .on() function which is documented here: http://api.jquery.com/on/

This is needed because the class doesn't exist on DOM ready, but it is added on runtime.

Hope this helps!

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The second event listener registration ($(".upload_cancel").click()) will only apply to elements that match the selector .upload_cancel at the time you call click(). So if your div doesn't have that class until after it's clicked, that event listener won't be registered to it. You can look into jQuery.live().

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If you are using atleast v1.7, you can achieve the same out as .live using .on

$(document).on("click", ".upload_cancel", function(event){

This was added in v1.7 and has the same functionality as the .live and as such .live was depreciated.

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The example using live depends on deprecated code in the latest version of jQuery (1.7.1). You should use this instead:

$('.upload-submit').on('click', function() {
    $(this).removeClass('upload-submit');
    $(this).addClass('upload-cancel');
});

$('.upload-cancel').on('click', function() {
    alert('test');
});

If you have a version older than that, use delegate:

$(document).delegate('.upload-submit', function() {
    $(this).removeClass('upload-submit');
    $(this).addClass('upload-cancel');
});

$(document).delegate('.upload-cancel', function() {
    alert('test');
});
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