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I rarely have to deal with scripting, so I'm up against a lack of knowledge for this problem.

I have a file >500mb in text, which is nicely sectioned, but I know there are 5 to 10 "bad" sections inside. The data within the sections can be evaluated pretty easily by a human, I don't know how to do it in a program.

I pick up a known good value in #Field MyField - however if that value did not appear in #FIELD LOCATION, something went wrong.

An example of two sections within the file looks like this. The first is 'bad' and the second is 'good'.

#START Descriptor
#FIELD LOCATION="http://path.to/file/here&Value=FOO&OtherValue=BLAH"
#FIELD AnythingElse
#FIELD MyField="BAR"
#END
#START Descriptor
#FIELD LOCATION="http://path.to/file/here&Value=BAR&OtherValue=BLAH"
#FIELD AnythingElse
#FIELD MyField="BAR"
#END
  1. Sections start and end logically, with #START and #END

  2. If #FIELD LOCATION does not exist, go to next section

  3. If #FIELD MyField="BAR" and #FIELD LOCATION does not contain BAR, print all lines from this section to a new file.

  4. Note - Clarification of #FIELD MyField="BAR" - this is a check value I put in by grabbing other info about the data as this file is being built (in my case it is a language indicator, such as EN or DE. so it would literally be #FIELD MyField="EN" Any other value in this field would be ignored, this isn't a record that matches my criteria.

I believe this can be done in Awk or Perl, I can do very simple one-liners but this is beyond my skills.

share|improve this question
    
Are the sections separated by newlines, or are they one after another? –  Dan Fego Jan 23 '12 at 20:13
    
Does your "good section" want to have a double quote between "LOCATION=" and "http:" ? –  hochgurgler Jan 23 '12 at 20:23
    
So what precisely makes the bad section bad? Value=FOO in the URL vs. BAR in the MyField? (and is there supposed to be a quote before the http in the good section?) –  Kevin Jan 23 '12 at 20:24
    
Kevin - the "bad" is exactly that, I have a known good value in MyField, and if that value didn't show up in the Location string, something went wrong. –  winndm Jan 23 '12 at 20:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could do something like below. It's just a rough draft, but it will work with your sample data. Use the flip-flop operator to find the start and end of records. Use a hash to store the field values, and an array to store the record.

I am simply checking if the value is in the location string, you might wish to further narrow the check by making sure it is in the correct place, or the correct case.

use strict;
use warnings;

my @record;
my %f;
while(<DATA>) {
    if (/^#START / .. /^#END */) {
        if (/^#START /) {
            @record = (); # reset
            %f = ();
        }
        push @record, $_;
        if (/^#END */) { # check and print
            if ($f{'LOCATION'} !~ /$f{'MyField'}/) {
                print @record; 
            }
        } else {         # add fields to hash
            if (/^#FIELD (.+)/) {
                            # use split with limit of 2 fields
                my ($key, $val) = split /=/, $1, 2;
                next unless $val; # no empty values
                $val =~ s/^"|"$//g; # strip quotes
                $f{$key} = $val;
            }
        }
    }
}

__DATA__
#START Descriptor
#FIELD LOCATION="http://path.to/file/here&Value=FOO&OtherValue=BLAH"
#FIELD AnythingElse
#FIELD MyField="BAR"
#END
#START Descriptor
#FIELD LOCATION=http://path.to/file/here&Value=BAR&OtherValue=BLAH"
#FIELD AnythingElse
#FIELD MyField="BAR"
#END
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, it's mine,I was thinking that flip-flop is not needed, but until I realized I'm wrong the vote was locked. kindly "edit" your answer so I can correct my mistake. –  Sorin Jan 23 '12 at 21:07
    
This was nicely commented and useful to me as the questioner. Its very cool that I have both a "short" answer and a "long" answer. Thanks! (I'm fiddling with these suggestions now!) –  winndm Jan 23 '12 at 21:08

One-liner:

perl -ne 'BEGIN { $/ = "#END\n" }' -e '/MyField="(.*?)"/; print if !/Value=$1/' <file >newfile

Sets the Input Record Separator to "#END\n" so perl reads the 'chunks' into $_ one at a time, then captures the value in MyField and prints the whole chunk if Value=$1 (that is, that capture after 'Value=') is not present.

You may of course make the regexes more specific if needed.

share|improve this answer
    
print $_ is not necessary, $_ is the default variable, print should suffice –  Sorin Jan 23 '12 at 20:50
1  
file >newfile would work just as well as <file >newfile. Actually it works better as $ARGV will get set to the input file-name. –  Brad Gilbert Jan 23 '12 at 20:56

Here is a small gawk one-liner for you -

gawk '
{
    if ($2!~/^#FIELD LOCATION/)
    {
        next;
    }
    else
    {
        split($2,ary,"=|&");
        split($4,ary1,"=|\"");
        if(ary[4]!=ary1[3])
            {
                print $0 > "badrec.file"
            }
    }
}' RS="#END\n" ORS="#END\n" FS="\n" file

Input File:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat file
#START Descriptor # Good Record
#FIELD LOCATION="http://path.to/file/here&Value=BAR&OtherValue=BLAH"
#FIELD AnythingElse
#FIELD MyField="BAR"
#END
#START Descriptor # Bad Record
#FIELD LOCATION="http://path.to/file/here&Value=FOO&OtherValue=BLAH"
#FIELD AnythingElse
#FIELD MyField="BAR"
#END
#START Descriptor # Good Record
#FIELD LOCATION="http://path.to/file/here&Value=BAR&OtherValue=BLAH"
#FIELD AnythingElse
#FIELD MyField="BAR"
#END

Test:

[jaypal:~/Temp] gawk '
{
    if ($2!~/^#FIELD LOCATION/)
    {
        next;
    }
    else
    {
        split($2,ary,"=|&");
        split($4,ary1,"=|\"");
        if(ary[4]!=ary1[3])
            {
                print $0 > "badrec.file"
            }
    }
}' RS="#END\n" ORS="#END\n" FS="\n" file

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat badrec.file 
#START Descriptor # Bad Record
#FIELD LOCATION="http://path.to/file/here&Value=FOO&OtherValue=BLAH"
#FIELD AnythingElse
#FIELD MyField="BAR"
#END
share|improve this answer

Set input record separator to #END\n and read directly records:

#!/usr/bin/perl

$/ = "#END\n";

while (<DATA>) {
    next unless /^#FIELD LOCATION/m;
    /^#FIELD MyField="(.*)"$/m;
    next if /^#FIELD LOCATION.*$1/m;
    print
}



__DATA__
#START Descriptor
#FIELD LOCATION="http://path.to/file/here&Value=FOO&OtherValue=BLAH"
#FIELD AnythingElse
#FIELD MyField="BAR"
#END
#START Descriptor
#FIELD LOCATION=http://path.to/file/here&Value=BAR&OtherValue=BLAH"
#FIELD AnythingElse
#FIELD MyField="BAR"
#END
share|improve this answer
    
In the 2nd record, where MyField=BAR and Location includes BAR, that's an OK record, my operations succeeded. The prior record, where BAR is not appearing in LOCATION was the error. It tells me I had a problem parsing the file in that location. I only want to read the segments that had a problem. –  winndm Jan 23 '12 at 20:57

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