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Possible Duplicate:
Operator overloading

I didn't find any thing that could help me in this subject... I'm trying to over load the << operator, this is my code:

 ostream& Complex::operator<<(ostream& out,const Complex& b){
    out<<"("<<b.x<<","<<b.y<<")";
    return out;
}    

this is the declaration in the H file:

 ostream& operator<<(ostream& out,const Complex& b);

I get this error: error: std::ostream& Complex::operator<<(std::ostream&, const Complex&) must take exactly one argument

what and why I'm doing wrong? thanks

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marked as duplicate by Xeo, Mooing Duck, GWW, Bo Persson, Cody Gray Jan 23 '12 at 22:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 8 down vote accepted

your operator << should be free function, not Complex class member in your case.

If you did your operator << class member, it actually should take one parameter, which should be stream. But then you won't be able to write like

std::cout << complex_number;

but

complex_number << std::cout;

which is equivalent to

complex_number. operator << (std::cout);

It is not common practice, as you can note, that is why operator << usually defined as free function.

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2  
and that free function would usually be a friend of your object. – AJG85 Jan 23 '12 at 21:41

As noted, the streaming overloads need to to be free functions, defined outside of your class.

Personally, I prefer to stay away from friendship and redirect to a public member function instead:

class Complex
{
public:
   std::ostream& output(std::ostream& s) const;
};

std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& s, const Complex& c)
{
   return c.output(s);
}
share|improve this answer

declare it as friend like this:

friend ostream& Complex::operator<<(ostream& out,const Complex& b)
{ ... }

edit >>

I believe the above is not right because declaring friend in .cpp is a wrong syntax, it must be declared as friend in .h file in class definition and that simply makes it a global function.

class Complex
{
public:
  std::ostream& output(std::ostream& s) const;

  friend std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& s, const Complex& c)
  {
     return c.output(s);
  }
};

More on friend here

share|improve this answer
3  
It cannot be both a friend and a member at the same time. – Bo Persson Jan 23 '12 at 21:34
    
You are right, this topic can be confusing and my memory is not fresh. Declaring an operator as friend in .h file actually makes it a global function which should be the correct syntax so perhaps not a friend in .cpp file..I think its kind of forbidden (if my memory is correct). – zar Jan 24 '12 at 20:38

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