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Firstly, sorry about the question title. I'm not up with statistics parlance or this kind of join difficulty whatever that may be.

I have a query*, with it I essentially generate three things.. a random_sex, random_first, and random_last. I'm trying to join now with this method.

 random_sex |   random_first   |   random_last    
------------+------------------+------------------
 male       | 47.7101715711225 | 24.3833348881337
 male       | 72.8463141907472 | 28.3560050522089
 female     | 72.8617294209544 | 33.3203859277759
 male       | 39.3406164890062 | 26.3352867371729
 female     | 28.6855500966031 | 65.8870893270099
 female     | 35.5960198949557 | 83.1188118207422
 male       | 11.5711074977927 |  10.544433838184
 male       | 15.6900786811765 | 18.7324617852545
 male       | 24.9860797089245 | 8.98265511383023
 female     | 80.4563122882508 |  35.594445341751
(10 rows)

Essentially the census data sits in a table like this...

    name    | freq  | cumfreq | rank | name_type 
------------+-------+---------+------+-----------
 SMITH      | 1.006 |   1.006 |    1 | LAST
 JOHNSON    |  0.81 |   1.816 |    2 | LAST
 WILLIAMS   | 0.699 |   2.515 |    3 | LAST
 JONES      | 0.621 |   3.136 |    4 | LAST
 BROWN      | 0.621 |   3.757 |    5 | LAST
 DAVIS      |  0.48 |   4.237 |    6 | LAST
 MILLER     | 0.424 |    4.66 |    7 | LAST
 WILSON     | 0.339 |       5 |    8 | LAST
 MOORE      | 0.312 |   5.312 |    9 | LAST
 TAYLOR     | 0.311 |   5.623 |   10 | LAST
 ANDERSON   | 0.311 |   5.934 |   11 | LAST
 THOMAS     | 0.311 |   6.245 |   12 | LAST
 JACKSON    |  0.31 |   6.554 |   13 | LAST
 WHITE      | 0.279 |   6.834 |   14 | LAST
 HARRIS     | 0.275 |   7.109 |   15 | LAST
 MARTIN     | 0.273 |   7.382 |   16 | LAST
 THOMPSON   | 0.269 |   7.651 |   17 | LAST
 GARCIA     | 0.254 |   7.905 |   18 | LAST
 MARTINEZ   | 0.234 |    8.14 |   19 | LAST

And, in this case..

 random_sex |   random_first   |    random_last    
 male       | 47.7101715711225 | 24.3833348881337

I want it to be joined like this (procedurally):

=# select * from census.names where cumfreq > 47.7101715711225 AND name_type = 'MALE_FIRST' order by cumfreq asc limit 1;
  name  | freq  | cumfreq | rank | name_type  
--------+-------+---------+------+------------
 SILVER | 0.009 |  47.717 | 1424 | MALE_FIRST

=# select * from census.names where cumfreq > 24.3833348881337 AND name_type = 'LAST' order by cumfreq asc limit 1;
  name  | freq  | cumfreq | rank | name_type 
--------+-------+---------+------+-----------
 HARPER | 0.054 |  24.408 |  185 | LAST

So this gents name would be Silver Harper. I've never met one in my life, but they do exist.

I'd like to return "Silver" "Harper" in the above query rather than random numbers. How can I make it work like this?


FOOTNOTE

*: Just to keep it simple:

SELECT
   CASE WHEN RANDOM() > 0.5 THEN 'male' ELSE 'female' END AS random_sex
   , RANDOM() * 90.020 AS random_first -- dataset is 90% of most popular
   , RANDOM() * 90.483 AS random_last
FROM generate_series(1,10,1);
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4 Answers

I actually don't know about statistics as well. but I think this is what you want

Lets name the table who returns the random columns Randoms

WITH RANDOMS AS
(
   SELECT
   CASE WHEN RANDOM() > 0.5 THEN 'male' ELSE 'female' END AS random_sex
   , RANDOM() * 90.020 AS random_first 
   , RANDOM() * 90.483 AS random_last
   FROM generate_series(1,10,1)
)
SELECT (
        SELECT A.NAME 
        FROM census.names A
        WHERE A.cumfreq > R.random_first
        AND A.name_type = 'MALE_FIRST'
        order by A.cumfreq asc limit 1
       ), 
       (
        SELECT A.NAME 
        FROM census.names A
        WHERE A.cumfreq > R.random_last
        AND A.name_type = 'LAST'
        order by A.cumfreq asc limit 1
       ) AS NAME
FROM RANDOMS R ;
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Correlated sub-queries?

SELECT
  *
FROM
  yourRandomTable
INNER JOIN
  census.names         AS first_name
    ON  first_name.cumfreq = (SELECT MIN(cumfreq)
                              FROM   census.names
                              WHERE  cumfreq > yourRandomTable.random_first
                                AND  type    = yourRandomTable.random_sex + '_FIRST')
    AND first_name.type    = yourRandomTable.random_sex + '_FIRST'
INNER JOIN
  census.names         AS last_name
    ON  last_name.cumfreq  = (SELECT MIN(cumfreq)
                              FROM   census.names
                              WHERE  cumfreq > yourRandomTable.random_last
                                AND  type    = 'LAST')
    AND last_name.type     = 'LAST'

You can vary this pattern quite a lot. Exactly how you choose to do it depends on how you have set up your indexes.

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EXPLAIN ANALYZE SELECT
  r.sex
  , r.detail
  , COALESCE(
    (SELECT name FROM census.names AS mf WHERE r.sex = 'male' AND mf.name_type = 'MALE_FIRST' AND mf.cumfreq > r.first ORDER BY cumfreq LIMIT 1)
    , (SELECT name FROM census.names AS ff WHERE r.sex = 'female' AND ff.name_type = 'FEMALE_FIRST' AND ff.cumfreq > r.first ORDER BY cumfreq LIMIT 1)
  ) AS first
  , (SELECT name FROM census.names AS l WHERE l.name_type = 'LAST' AND l.cumfreq > r.last ORDER BY cumfreq LIMIT 1) AS last
FROM (
  SELECT
    RANDOM() * 90.020 AS first
    , RANDOM() * 90.483 AS last
    , CASE WHEN RANDOM() > 0.5 THEN 'male' ELSE 'female' END AS sex
  FROM generate_series(1,10,1)
) AS r;

This is actually what I ended up going with.

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Cheat, cartesian product

Select q1.Name as Forename, q2.Name as Surname
From 
(select Name from census.names where cumfreq > 47.7101715711225 
 AND name_type = 'MALE_FIRST' order by cumfreq asc limit 1) q1, 
(select Name from census.names where cumfreq > 24.3833348881337 
 AND name_type = 'LAST' order by cumfreq asc limit 1) q2
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This isn't a join. I know I can do this. I'm trying to do this over a set. –  Evan Carroll Jan 23 '12 at 23:25
    
It's not a join? What is it then? –  Tony Hopkinson Jan 24 '12 at 10:28
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