Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to optimize some code here, and wrote two different simple subroutines that will subtract one vector from another. I pass a pair of vectors to these subroutines and the subtraction is then performed. The first subroutine uses an intermediary variable to store the result whereas the second one does an inline operation using the '-=' operator. The full code is located at the bottom of this question.

When I use purely real numbers, the program works fine and there are no issues. However, if I am using complex operands, then the original vectors (the ones originally passed to the subroutines) are modified! Why does this program work fine for purely real numbers but do this sort of data modification when using complex numbers?

Note my process:

  1. Generate random vectors (either real or complex depending on the commented out code)
  2. Print the main vectors to the screen
  3. Perform the first subroutine subtraction (using the third variable intermediary within the subroutine)
  4. Print the main vectors to the screen again to prove that they have not changed, no matter the use of real or complex vectors
  5. Perform the second subroutine subtraction (using the inline computation method)
  6. Print the main vectors to the screen again, showing that @main_v1 has changed when using complex vectors, but will not change when using real vectors (@main_v2 is unaffected)
  7. Print the final answers to the subtraction, which are always the correct answers, regardless of real or complex vectors

The issue arises because in the case of the second subroutine (which is quite a bit faster), I don't want the @main_v1 vector changed. I need that vector to do further calculations down the road, so I need it to stay the same.

Any idea on how to fix this, or what I'm doing wrong? My entire code is below, and should be functional. I've been using the CLI syntax shown below to run the program. I choose 5 just to keep everything easy for me to read.

c:\> bench.pl 5 REAL

or

c:\> bench.pl 5 IMAG

#!/usr/local/bin/perl
# when debugging: add -w option above
#

use strict;
use warnings;
use Benchmark qw (:all);
use Math::Complex;
use Math::Trig;
use Time::HiRes qw (gettimeofday);

system('cls');

my $dimension = $ARGV[0];
my $type = $ARGV[1];

if(!$dimension || !$type){
    print "bench.pl <n> <REAL | IMAG>\n";
    print "   <n> indicates the dimension of the vector to generate\n";
    print "   <REAL | IMAG> dictates to use real or complex vectors\n";
    exit(0);
}

my @main_v1;
my @main_v2;
my @vector_sum1;
my @vector_sum2;

for($a=1;$a<=$dimension;$a++){

    my $r1 = sprintf("%.0f", 9*rand)+1;
    my $r2 = sprintf("%.0f", 9*rand)+1;
    my $i1 = sprintf("%.0f", 9*rand)+1;
    my $i2 = sprintf("%.0f", 9*rand)+1;

    if(uc($type) eq "IMAG"){
        # Using complex vectors has the issue
        $main_v1[$a] = cplx($r1,$i1);
        $main_v2[$a] = cplx($r2,$i2);
    }elsif(uc($type) eq "REAL"){
        # Using real vectors shows no issue
        $main_v1[$a] = $r1;
        $main_v2[$a] = $r2;
    }else {
        print "bench.pl <n> <REAL | IMAG>\n";
        print "   <n> indicates the dimension of the vector to generate\n";
        print "   <REAL | IMAG> dictates to use real or complex vectors\n";
        exit(0);
    }
}

# cmpthese(-5, {
#   v1 => sub {@vector_sum1 = vector_subtract(\@main_v1, \@main_v2)},
#   v2 => sub {@vector_sum2 = vector_subtract_v2(\@main_v1, \@main_v2)},
# });
# print "\n";

print "main vectors as defined initially\n";
print_vector_matlab(@main_v1);
print_vector_matlab(@main_v2);
print "\n";

@vector_sum1 = vector_subtract(\@main_v1, \@main_v2);
print "main vectors after the subtraction using 3rd variable\n";
print_vector_matlab(@main_v1);
print_vector_matlab(@main_v2);
print "\n";

@vector_sum2 = vector_subtract_v2(\@main_v1, \@main_v2);
print "main vectors after the inline subtraction\n";
print_vector_matlab(@main_v1);
print_vector_matlab(@main_v2);
print "\n";

print "subtracted vectors from both subroutines\n";
print_vector_matlab(@vector_sum1);
print_vector_matlab(@vector_sum2);


sub vector_subtract {
    # subroutine to subtract one [n x 1] vector from another
    # result = vector1 - vector2
    # 
    my @vector1 = @{$_[0]};
    my @vector2 = @{$_[1]};
    my @result;

    my $row = 0;
    my $dim1 = @vector1 - 1;
    my $dim2 = @vector2 - 1;

    if($dim1 != $dim2){
        syswrite STDOUT, "ERROR: attempting to subtract vectors of mismatched dimensions\n";
        exit;
    }

    for($row=1;$row<=$dim1;$row++){$result[$row] = $vector1[$row] - $vector2[$row]}

    return(@result);
}

sub vector_subtract_v2 {
    # subroutine to subtract one [n x 1] vector from another
    # implements the inline subtraction method for alleged speedup
    # result = vector1 - vector2
    # 
    my @vector1 = @{$_[0]};
    my @vector2 = @{$_[1]};

    my $row = 0;
    my $dim1 = @vector1 - 1;
    my $dim2 = @vector2 - 1;

    if($dim1 != $dim2){
        syswrite STDOUT, "ERROR: attempting to subtract vectors of mismatched dimensions\n";
        exit;
    }
    for($row=1;$row<=$dim1;$row++){$vector1[$row] -= $vector2[$row]}        # subtract inline

    return(@vector1);
}

sub print_vector_matlab {       # for use with outputting square matrices only
    my (@junk) = (@_);
    my $dimension = @junk - 1;
    print "V=[";
    for($b=1;$b<=$dimension;$b++){
        # $temp_real = sprintf("%.3f", Re($junk[$b][$c]));
        # $temp_imag = sprintf("%.3f", Im($junk[$b][$c]));
        # $temp_cplx = cplx($temp_real,$temp_imag);
        print "$junk[$b];";
        # print "$temp_cplx,";
    }
    print "];\n";
}

I've even tried modifying the second subroutine so that it has the following lines, and it STILL alters the @main_v1 vector when using complex numbers...I am completely confused as to what's going on.

@result = @vector1;
for($row=1;$row<=$dim1;$row++){$result[$row] -= $vector2[$row]}

return(@result);

and I've tried this too...still modifies @main_V1 with complex numbers

for($row-1;$row<=$dim1;$row++){$result[$row] = $vector1[$row]}
for($row=1;$row<=$dim1;$row++){$result[$row] -= $vector2[$row]}

return(@result);
share|improve this question
1  
Perhaps you should clarify by showing actual and expected output. –  TLP Jan 23 '12 at 23:52

2 Answers 2

Upgrade Math::Complex to at least version 1.57. As the changelog explains, one of the changes in that version was:

Add copy constructor and arrange for it to be called appropriately, problem found by David Madore and Alexandr Ciornii.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1. I hope you don't mind, I edited your answer to also explain why. –  ruakh Jan 24 '12 at 0:07
    
Thanks, guys! That completely solved the issue. I guess this ended up being a stupid question, but being a beginner, I don't know what things like 'copy constructor' are, so when I read the change logs, that stuff goes right over my head. –  user1164453 Jan 24 '12 at 0:17
    
The new Math::Complex works for 1-dimensional arrays, but if I try to use a 2D matrix, I get the same issue. –  user1164453 Jan 24 '12 at 17:41
    
@user1164453: Absolutely not a stupid question. Operator overloading and copy-constructors are very familiar to C++ programmers, but not so familiar to programmers in most other languages. In fact, offhand I can't think of a single other language that has them. (And if this were really a stupid/obvious thing, then it wouldn't have made it all the way to version 1.56 of this module!) –  ruakh Jan 24 '12 at 19:30

In Perl, an object is a blessed reference; so an array of Math::Complexes is an array of references. This is not true of real numbers, which are just ordinary scalars.

If you change this:

$vector1[$row] -= $vector2[$row]

to this:

$vector1[$row] = $vector1[$row] - $vector2[$row]

you'll be good to go: that will set $vector1[$row] to refer to a new object, rather than modifying the existing one.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that is obscure. +1 –  TLP Jan 24 '12 at 0:02
    
Hi ruakh, that seemed to do it. Unfortunately, that negates any performance improvement I had hoped to achieve. Oh well, at least it works now. Thanks! –  user1164453 Jan 24 '12 at 0:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.