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I have an AJAX request (using JQuery) that calls a PHP script which does some database business. The request code is as follows:

$.ajax({
    url: "script.php",
    data: { value: value
        },
    type: 'post',
    success: function(output){
        alert(output);
    }
});

However, I wanted to see if there was a way to also (in addition to the unchanged output string) return a status. It can be as simple as an integer. The point is I want to disable a button (with Javascript) if the PHP script for any reason fails to connect to mySQL, but I still want the PHP scripts output exactly as it would be.

I tried the error option:

...
success: function(output){
        alert(output);
    },
error: function(output){
        // do something
    }

but I do not know how to make PHP display an error and continue on the rest of the script. Again, I don't want to tamper at all with the output string.

In pseudo-code, I'm looking for something like this:

$.ajax({
    url: "script.php",
    data: { value: value
        },
    type: 'post',
    success: function(output){
        if(output.status == 0){
            alert(output);
        }else{
            // do something else
        }
    }
});

Is anything of the sort possible? Thanks for any and all help!

share|improve this question
1  
You can return more than one thing. You can json_encode an array to do this. EDIT: In your code $output = json_encode(array("text" => $text, "status" => "1")); echo $output; – jakx Jan 24 '12 at 0:15
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I usually return data from the server in JSON format. This way I can return as many different types of data as may be needed by the success function in javascript.

basically in PHP you would do something like

$response = new stdClass();
$response->error = 'Could not connect to Mysql';
$response->message = 'Some other text';
echo json_encode($response);

in JQuery, the ajax() method would automatically detect that the response is json and parse it into a javascript object, so you could access like this

if (typeof response.error !== undefined) alert(response.error);

for more on that look at dataType argument for the ajax() method in the jQuery documentation.

share|improve this answer

Yes. You can use HTTP status codes:

header('HTTP/1.1 500 Internal Server Error');

And use jQuery's statusCode property for jQuery.ajax():

$.ajax({
    // stuff
    statusCode: {
        500: function(data) {
            alert('Something went wrong!');
        }
    }
});

If your needs extend beyond what HTTP can offer, you can just return a status code within your data and process it in the success function, switching on data.status.

share|improve this answer
    
He says he wants to continue on with the rest of the script, as in he still wants to get text back from the server regardless if he can connect to the database or not. – jakx Jan 24 '12 at 0:30
    
Nothing in my answer would prevent that from happening... – drrcknlsn Jan 24 '12 at 0:33
    
In your "statusCode" callback he's not getting any data back from the server other a status code. He wants text and a status code. – jakx Jan 24 '12 at 0:34
    
Again, nothing in my answer prevents him from getting both a status code and his normal data back from the server. – drrcknlsn Jan 24 '12 at 0:37
    
Well thanks for explaining but I figured it out. In case anyone is wondering there is nothing to prevent you from sending data even if your header is a 500 error. I still think its better to just send the data in an array but maybe thats not what he was asking. – jakx Jan 24 '12 at 0:41

If I haven't misunderstood your question...

What I usually do is set the datatype of the AJAX call to 'xml' and output an xml from my PHP script. So I get multiple values in result. I usually make these attribute values.

<result status="success" something="etc" />
// vs.
<result status="failure" error="1" />
// consider 1 as the DB error

With this approach you might need to use the @ tags in some PHP functions to prevent outputting the default errors.

share|improve this answer
    
yikes. xml is pretty heavy for client-server messages. also much harder to create. ever use json? – dqhendricks Jan 24 '12 at 3:13
    
I'm never sending long responses from PHP. I always have those in my Javascript so I'm actually calling, say errors[1] in the above example to output the error. – inhan Jan 25 '12 at 14:30
    
still with json encode you work with native php data types, then transmit less data over the wire. – dqhendricks Jan 30 '12 at 3:46

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