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Here is my attempt which is NOT tail call optimized because I need to dispose the enumerator:

let Group func seed (items : seq<'t>) = 
    let rec some (i : IEnumerator<'t>) state = seq {
        try
            if i.MoveNext()
            then
                let newstate, iscomplete = func (i.Current) state
                if iscomplete
                then 
                    yield newstate
                    yield! some i newstate
            else
                yield state
        finally
            i.Dispose() }

    some (items.GetEnumerator ()) seed

And here is example usage:

let buffer maxBufferSize items =
    Group (fun item state ->
        let newstate = [ item ] |> List.append state
        if newstate.Length >= maxBufferSize
        then (newstate, true)
        else (newstate, false)) List.empty items

If I can avoid using the enumerator (i.e. Seq.head AND Seq.tail) I could make it work but without Seq.tail I am at a loss. I am really hoping to make this work with generic sequences..

And FYI I know this code won't work in its current state because I would end up disposing the enumerator multiple times.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can move the try .. finally block from the inner some function (where it is entered during every iteration) to the main function. Then the inner recursive function some becomes tail-recursive:

let Group func seed (items : seq<'t>) =  
    // The handling of exceptions is done by the caller, 
    // so 'some' does not need to handle exceptions...
    let rec some (i : IEnumerator<'t>) state = seq { 
        if i.MoveNext() 
        then 
            let newstate, iscomplete = func (i.Current) state 
            if iscomplete then  
                yield newstate 
                // Recursive call in tail-call position
                yield! some i newstate 
        else 
            yield state }

    // Return a sequence that wraps the obtains the IEnumerator
    // and guarantees that it gets disposed if 'some' fails
    seq {
      let i = items.GetEnumerator ()
      try 
          // This is still not-tail recursive
          yield! some i seed 
      finally
          i.Dispose() }

Or even better, you can implement the sequence that is returned from Group using the use construct:

    seq {
        use i = items.GetEnumerator ()
        // This is still not-tail recursive
        yield! some i seed } 

Actually, I think this is more correct than your original code, because it calls the Dispose method only once. In your version, it would be called once for every time the execution enters some (which would depend on the number of elements processed before an exception happens).

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That was my first implementation but I thought i would be disposed when it goes out of scope and I thought it would go out of scope after the yield!. Since the sequence was lazy then the enumerator would end up disposed before the sequence gets enumerated... Am I crazy? –  Brad Jan 24 '12 at 1:08
    
@Brad The trick is to use the use keyword inside the seq { .. } block. Then the F# compiler generates code that disposes the resource after the entire sequence is enumerated. This would be problem only if use was inside the body of Group, but not inside seq { .. } that later calls some using yield!. Hope this makes sense! –  Tomas Petricek Jan 24 '12 at 3:33

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