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So I have a fairly standard LINQ-to-Object setup.

var query = expensiveSrc.Where(x=> x.HasFoo)
                        .OrderBy(y => y.Bar.Count())
                        .Select(z => z.FrobberName);    

// ...

if (!condition && !query.Any())
 return; // seems to enumerate and sort entire enumerable 

// ...

foreach (var item in query)
   // ...

This enumerates everything twice. Which is bad.

var queryFiltered = expensiveSrc.Where(x=> x.HasFoo);

var query = queryFiltered.OrderBy(y => y.Bar.Count())
                         .Select(z => z.FrobberName); 

if (!condition && !queryFiltered.Any())
   return;

// ...

foreach (var item in query)
   // ...

Works, but is there a better way?

Would there be any non-insane way to "enlighten" Any() to bypass the non-required operations? I think I remember this sort of optimisation going into EduLinq.

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7 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

There is not much information that can be extracted from an enumerable, so maybe it's better to turn the query into an IQueryable? This Any extension method walks down its expression tree skipping all irrelevant operations, then it turns the important branch into a delegate that can be called to obtain an optimized IQueryable. Standard Any method applied to it explicitly to avoid recursion. Not sure about corner cases, and maybe it makes sense to cache compiled queries, but with simple queries like yours it seems to work.

static class QueryableHelper {
    public static bool Any<T>(this IQueryable<T> source) {
        var e = source.Expression;
        while (e is MethodCallExpression) {
            var mce = e as MethodCallExpression;
            switch (mce.Method.Name) {
                case "Select":
                case "OrderBy":
                case "ThenBy": break;
                default: goto dun;
            }
            e = mce.Arguments.First();
        }
        dun:
        var d = Expression.Lambda<Func<IQueryable<T>>>(e).Compile();
        return Queryable.Any(d());
    }
}

Queries themselves must be modified like this:

var query = expensiveSrc.AsQueryable()
                        .Where(x=> x.HasFoo)
                        .OrderBy(y => y.Bar.Count())
                        .Select(z => z.FrobberName); 
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Why not just get rid of the redundant:

if (!query.Any())
 return; 

It really doesn't seem to be serving any purpose - even without it, the body of the foreach won't execute if the query yields no results. So with the Any() check in, you save nothing in the fast path, and enumerate twice in the slow path.

On the other hand, if you must know if there were any results found after the end of the loop, you might as well just use a flag:

bool itemFound = false;

foreach (var item in query)
{
    itemFound = true;
    ... // Rest of the loop body goes here.
}

if(itemFound)
{
   // ...
}

Or you could use the enumerator directly if you're really concerned about the redundant flag-setting in the loop body:

using(var erator = query.GetEnumerator())
{
    bool itemFound = erator.MoveNext();

    if(itemFound)
    {
       do
       {
           // Do something with erator.Current;
       } while(erator.MoveNext())
    }

   // Do something with itemFound
}
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1  
This works fine, but only because he didn't have any code between the if and the foreach. –  Gabe Jan 24 '12 at 1:15
    
@Gabe: I don't understand. There is no code between the if and the foreach. Why should we assume otherwise? –  Ani Jan 24 '12 at 1:19
    
I was retyping from memory, the code is actually more like if (condition && query.Any()) { /* .. */ foreach {..} /* .. */ }. Yes I could unroll the foreach and do it more efficiently (at the expense of readability), but getting the first item twice isn't bad (and it's bounded). The entire sequence however... I'm also thinking of more complex situations where queries are passed around or written by different people where it might be harder to simply use an intermediate value. –  Fowl Jan 24 '12 at 2:03
    
You can anyway start using the enumerator –  ivowiblo Jul 6 '12 at 4:54
    
I mean, instead of using Any(), use the enumerator.MoveNext(). Then, you continue using the enumerator instead of the foreach. The code won't be so clear, but that's what happens when you optimize your code. –  ivowiblo Jul 6 '12 at 4:55
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Would there be any non-insane way to "enlighten" Any() to bypass the non-required operations? I think I remember this sort of optimisation going into EduLinq.

Well I'm not going to ignore any question which mentions Edulinq :)

In this case, Edulinq might well be faster than LINQ to Objects, as its OrderBy implementation is as lazy as it can be - it only sorts as much as it needs to in order to retrieve the elements it returns.

However, fundamentally it still has to read the whole sequence in before it returns anything. After all, the last element in the sequence could be the first one which has to be returned.

If you're in control of the whole stack, you could make Any() detect that it's being called on your "known" IOrderedEnumerable implementation, and go straight to the original source. Note that this does create a change in the observed behaviour though - if iterating over the whole sequence throws an exception (or has any other side effect) then that side-effect would be lost by the optimization. You could argue that's okay, of course - what counts as "valid" optimization in LINQ is a decidedly tricky area.

One other possibility which is pretty horrible but which would solve this particular problem would be to make the iterator returned from the IOrderedEnumerable just take the first value of MoveNext() from the source. That's enough for the normal implementation of Any, and at that point we don't need to know what the first element is. We could defer the actual sorting until the first time the Current property is used.

That's a pretty special-case optimization though - and one which I'd be wary to implement. I think Ani's approach is the better one - just use the fact that iterating over query using foreach will never go into the body of the loop if the query results are empty.

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Edit (revised): This answer adressess the issue of the query executing twice, which I believe is the key issue. See below why:

Making Any() smarter is something that only the Linq implementers can do, IMO... Or it would be some dirty adventure using reflection.

Using a class as shown below, you can cache the output of the original enumerable, and let it be enumerated twice:

public class CachedEnumerable<T> 
{
    public CachedEnumerable(IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
    {
        _source = enumerable.GetEnumerator();
    }

    public IEnumerable<T> Enumerate()
    {
        int itemIndex = 0;
        while (true)
        {
            if (itemIndex < _cache.Count)
            {
                yield return _cache[itemIndex];
                itemIndex++;
                continue;
            }

            if (!_source.MoveNext())
                yield break;

            var current = _source.Current;
            _cache.Add(current);
            yield return current;
            itemIndex++;                 
        }

    }

    private List<T> _cache = new List<T>();
    private IEnumerator<T> _source;
}

This way you keep the lazy aspect of LINQ, keep the code readable and generic. It wil be slower that directly using IEnumerator<>. There are lots of opportunities to extend, and optimize this class, such as a policy for discarding old items, getting rid of the coroutine etc. But that is beyond the point of this question I think.

Oh, and the class is not thread safe as it is now. This wasn't asked, but I can imagine people trying. I think this could be easily added, if the source enumerable has no thread affinity..

Why would this be optimal?

Let's consider two possibilites: the enumeration could containt elements or it does not.

  • If it contains elements, this approach is optimal as the query is only run once.
  • If it contains no elements, you would be tempted to eliminate the OrderBy and Select part of your queries, as they add no value. But.. if there are zero items after the Where() clause, there are zero items to sort, which will cost zero time (well, almost). The same goes for the Select() clause.

What if this is not fast enough yet? In that case my strategy would be to bypass Linq. Now, I really love linq, but it's elegance comes at a price. So for every 100 times of using Linq, there typically will be one or two computations that are important to execute really fast, which I write with good old for loops and lists. Part of mastering a technology is recognizing where it is not appropriate. Linq is no exception to that rule.

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Try this:

var items = expensiveSrc.Where(x=> x.HasFoo)
                        .OrderBy(y => y.Bar.Count())
                        .Select(z => z.FrobberName).ToList();   

// ...

if (!condition && items.Count == 0)
 return; // Just check the count

// ...

foreach (var item in items)
   // ...

The query is executed just once.

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but I've lost the streaming/lazy loading that's half the point of linq. –  Fowl Jul 6 '12 at 4:59
1  
But the streaming and the lazy loading finish when you execute the Any() extension method! If theres any, then you'll need to execute the whole query anyway. If not, doing an OrderBy to an empty enumerable will be cheap. Indeed, that's what the whole question is about: avoiding executing a query twice due the streaming/lazy loading of Linq. –  ivowiblo Jul 6 '12 at 12:03
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but I've lost the streaming/lazy loading that's half the point of linq

Lazy loading (deferred execution), and 2 LINQ queries with disparate results cannot be optimized (reduced) to 1 query execution.

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That's strictly true, I suppose. However Any does not require, and is fact not a result of an entire "query execution". Think small marginal cost, but multiplied by a large number. –  Fowl Jul 6 '12 at 5:20
    
Any has marginal cost (multiplied by large number makes it large). This is true, and this is what you have done which i suppose is the best/only way. You can refactor your code to make it look better, but performance wise i cant think of better alternative. Answer by ivowiblo is what is required (at expense of losing deferred execution). But you does not seem to agree to it. –  Tilak Jul 6 '12 at 5:24
    
I suppose it's always difficult to determine when to accept "no, there is no better way (within the constraints)". Maybe one day linq-to-objects will have a query optimiser? ;) –  Fowl Jul 6 '12 at 5:32
    
Forget Linq to object, think logically. If logical solution exists, we can implement it with ease. What you are expecting is that any query that has been executed, should be cached, and then for any future query, if any part of previously executed query can be reused, it should be done. As it happens in Database query execution. IMHO, it will pollute the simplicity of LINQ. –  Tilak Jul 6 '12 at 5:38
    
Yes there are advantages and disadvantages to the way that linq is currently implemented. Simplicity/ease of understanding is a big plus in my book too. –  Fowl Jul 6 '12 at 5:42
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why are you not using a .ToArray()

var query = expensiveSrc.Where(x=> x.HasFoo)
                    .OrderBy(y => y.Bar.Count())
                    .Select(z => z.FrobberName).ToArray();    

if there are not elements, sorting and selecting should not give much overhead. if you are sorting, then you need anyway a cache where to store the data, so the overhead .ToArray produces should not be so much. if you decompile the OrderedEnumerable class, you find that there an int[] array containing the references is formed, so you just create by using .ToArray (or .ToList) a new reference array.

BUT if expensiveSrc comes from a database, other strategies could be better. if the ordering can be done in the database, this would give to you quite lot of overhead because the data is stored twice.

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