Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a fairly simple data audit web application written with ASP MVC which effectively has two views of the same model for different purposes.

  1. Agent view - The form filled out by the person validating information the information. Each field on the form in this view has 3 subfields:

    a. Original Value - The value from the database before the call was made

    b. New Value - The value provided by the person on the phone if it differs from the original.

    c. Action - A general indication of what happened

  2. QC View - The form filled out by someone who reviews the work performed in Agent view. Each field on the form in this view has 5 subfields:

    a. Original Value - Same as above

    b. Agent Value - The value provided in 1b above by the agent.

    c. QC Value - The corrected "New Value" if the value specified by the agent is incorrect.

    d. Agent Action - Same as above, except read only in this view

    e. QC Action - The corrected "New Action" if improperly chosen by the agent.

The only differences between the two views are the subfields available. I'd like to be able to use a single view to represent both views since the overall structure of the pages is identical, and just use HTML helpers to handle the differences in subfields. What I have so far are 2 distinctly separate series of helpers (currently in the same class though could be separated):

// Agent controls
public static MvcHtmlString AuditControl(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string id, string fieldLabel, MvcHtmlString editControl, string cssClass)
public static MvcHtmlString AuditControl(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string id, string fieldLabel, string editControl, string cssClass)
public static MvcHtmlString AuditControl<COMPLEX>(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string id, string fieldLabel, string cssClass) where COMPLEX : AbstractComplex, new()

// QC controls
public static MvcHtmlString ReviewControl(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string id, string fieldLabel, MvcHtmlString editControl, string cssClass)
public static MvcHtmlString ReviewControl(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string id, string fieldLabel, string editControl, string cssClass)
public static MvcHtmlString ReviewControl<COMPLEX>(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string id, string fieldLabel, string cssClass) where COMPLEX : AbstractComplex, new()

Where the third implementations handle the more complex fields composed of multiple pieces of data (like Full name, Address, etc).

One possible solution that I've considered is to separate the different types of controls into different classes which implement a common interface and then pass them as type parameters to more generic HTML helpers. I think this would work but then I'd somehow need to be able to tell the view which implementation it should use to draw the view, which seems problematic because it seems to blur the line between View and Controller.

One less appealing approach that seems obvious is to pass a sort of admin flag from the controller which would be used by a generic (in logic not meaning type generic) factory helper and build the logic in it to know which series of methods to use. This would keep the model and view separate, but feels dirty because then the HTML helper would become responsible for more than just building the HTML.

Is this a reasonable situation to break the separation of concerns as designed by MVC or is there a more appropriate solution?

share|improve this question
    
Your solution sounds overly complex. What version of ASP.NET MVC are you using? – SoWeLie Jan 24 '12 at 1:22
    
@SoWeLie - I'm using MVC 3. – M.Babcock Jan 24 '12 at 1:23
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you are using MVC3, I would recommend using child actions for the sub fields:

http://haacked.com/archive/2009/11/18/aspnetmvc2-render-action.aspx

Child actions allow you to execute an action on a controller inside of your view, this would be a much cleaner approach.

share|improve this answer
    
How is this any different from passing the state to a helper? – M.Babcock Jan 24 '12 at 2:11
    
Because with a child action, you can render another view. With a helper, you have to concatenate the markup inside of a C# function. – SoWeLie Jan 24 '12 at 2:13
    
Good point. I'll give it a shot. – M.Babcock Jan 24 '12 at 2:15

I was able to implement (my interpretation of) the advice provided by @SoWeLie fairly simply. It involved creating a new Model to house a superset of the possible control properties and a new view to be drawn for each different control set (one for Audit, and one for Review). The problem with it was the resulting View API was ugly:

@Html.RenderAction("DrawControl", new { id = "ID" ... })
// Repeated for all of the overloads of DrawControl

and each Controller action contained something like:

public ActionResult DrawControl(string id, ...)
{
    // FieldControl being the name of my Model
    var viewModel = new FieldControl() { ID = id, ... };
    if (shouldRenderAudit)
        return PartialView("AuditControl", viewModel);
    else
        return PartialView("ReviewControl", viewModel);

I couldn't figure out how to get my generic helper to work in this scenario, and besides, I wanted to remove reduce obvious code duplication so this quickly became:

@functions {
    public string DrawControl(string id, ...) 
    {
        return Html.Render("DrawControl", new { id = "ID" });
    }
    // Repeated for all of the overloads of DrawControl
}

@DrawControl("ID", ...)

With the same controller action. The problem with this (ignoring the fact that the View had functions at all) was that the @functions block had to be included in any view that wanted the benefit of using them (which is currently only 2 but will soon enough balloon to 5 and who knows what my predecessor is going to do with this). I quickly reworked the code again, this time to bring back the helpers (generally keeping the views, model, and controller changes) and finally ended up with this:

View:

@(Html.DrawComplexControl<ProviderName>("id", ...))
@Html.DrawSimpleControl("id", ...)

Controller:

// One common action that is used to determine which control should be drawn
public ActionResult DrawControl(FieldControl model)
{
    if (shouldRenderAudit)
        return PartialView("AuditControl", model);
    else
        return PartialView("ReviewControl", model);
}

Helper:

public static MvcHtmlString DrawControl(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string id, ...)
{
    var model = new FieldControl() { ID = id, ... };

    return htmlHelper.Action("DrawControl", model);
}

public static MvcHtmlString DrawSimpleControl(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string id, ...)
{
    return DrawSimpleControl(htmlHelper, id, ...);
}
public static MvcHtmlString DrawSimpleControl(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string id, ...)
{
    // Set some defaults to simplify the API
    return DrawControl(htmlHelper, id, ...);
}

public static MvcHtmlString DrawComplexControl<T>(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string id, ...) where T : AbstractComplex, new()
{
    // Build the required controls based on `T`

    return DrawControl(htmlHelper, id, ...);
}

Of course there were about a half dozen other iterations between the ones shown to help the situation, and none of them did to the extent necessary. I'm sure there are improvements to be made yet, but this is what I have so far.

Doing it this way provides a very simple API for the View to use without it having to know or care about implementation and it can satisfy all of the requirements of my pre-existing API with only minor modification (in the end at least). I'm not sure if this is what the answer intended as a result but it is functional and provides the simplicity necessary.

Hopefully my headaches will help someone else in the future.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.