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Can this be done in python? Start by print an infinite loop and changing values in between loops.

x = 5
while ( true ):
  print x
x = 3 # regain control of the interpreter and set to new value

expected output:

5
5
5
......
3
3
3
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There must be a condition that triggers the output value change. When do you want python to change the value? –  mauris Jan 24 '12 at 3:09
6  
take a step back and tell us what you are actually trying to solve with this idea.. –  wim Jan 24 '12 at 3:25
    
why not loop three times printing 5, then loop three times printing 3? why do you want an infinite loop? –  jb. Jan 24 '12 at 3:29
    
Basically I want to be running a python script in the background when I am using python in interpreter mode and using the interpreter to send commands to that background thread –  delita Jan 24 '12 at 7:40
    
How should the interpreter know whether a "command" is for the background thread or for immediate interpretation? –  Karl Knechtel Jan 24 '12 at 8:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, the code as you have written it will not work. The statement after the non-terminating loop will never get executed.

Try the following:

x = 5
while True:
  if (some-condition):
    x = 3
  print x

Alternatively, use threading, and change the value of x in a second thread:

def changeX():
  global x
  x = 3

x = 5
import threading
threading.Timer(3, changeX).start()  # executes changeX after 3 seconds in a second thread

while True:
  print x
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threading sounds like the best description of what he wants to do, except he would want to set up a separate thread that runs the python interpreter and has access to the main thread's global state... or something? o_O –  Karl Knechtel Jan 24 '12 at 8:02

It's unclear what you need to do this for, but you can catch the "ctrl-c" event and enter a new value:

x = 5
while True:
    try:
        print x
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        x = raw_input("Enter new value: ").strip()
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I think that the best answer to this question is to use threading, but there is a way to inject code into a running interpreter thread:

https://fedorahosted.org/pyrasite/

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interesintg link –  delita Jan 24 '12 at 23:02

Not exactly. Why do you want to do this? What's the underlying issue?

The "right" way to do it is probably to change the code within the while loop to occasionally actually check for your condition and then end the loop if it's time to end it (e.g., have a thread continue watching for console input)

With that said, technically you could attach to your running program with a debugger (such as winpdb or the built in pdb and mess with it.

But what you probably want to do, if I'm guessing right about your underlying motives, is continue to accept input despite doing some other processing simultaneously.

In that case, you want to learn how to use threads in Python. Check the threading module.

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