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try {
    FileReader fr = new FileReader(file);
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);
    String line = null;
} catch (FileNotFoundException fnf) {
    fnf.printStackTrace();
} finally {
    fr.close();
}

The fr.close() shows an error:

fr cannot be resolved

I had read that closing a file in the finally block is a good practice.
What is that am doing wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The variable fr only has scope within the try block. It is out of scope in the finally block. You need to declare it before the try block:

FileReader fr = null;
try {
    fr = new FileReader(file);
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);
    String line = null;
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} finally {
    if (fr != null) {
        try {
            fr.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            // This is unrecoverable. Just report it and move on
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

This is quite a common pattern of code, so it's good to remember it for future similar situations.

Consider throwing IOException from this method - printing track traces isn't very helpful to callers, and you wouldn't need the nested try catch around fr.close()

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If I do that then it says I need to add another Try block while closing the file. I read a previous post where it was said that nothing can be done about that. So, this would be the best way is it? –  noMAD Jan 24 '12 at 3:19
    
Yes, that is annoying. One often writes a utility method, named "closeQuietly" (or similar) to do this. It catches and ignores the Exception. –  user949300 Jan 24 '12 at 3:23
    
See edited answer for nested try/catch - also a common pattern –  Bohemian Jan 24 '12 at 3:24

Now finally block is not needed,

try (FileReader fr = new FileReader(file);
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);){

    String line = null;

    }

} catch(FileNotFoundException fnf) {
    fnf.printStackTrace();
} 

now automatically close your readers

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1  
Yes, but only in Java 7. Java 6 and earlier do not have this. –  user949300 Jan 24 '12 at 3:25
    
yes, that is true. –  Kushan Jan 24 '12 at 3:30

You have a problem with your scopes. If you really want to use that syntax you should fix it like this:

FileReader fr = null;
try {
    fr = new FileReader(file);
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);
    String line = null;
} catch (FileNotFoundException fnf) {
    fnf.printStackTrace();
} finally {
    if( fr != null)
       fr.close();
}

that way, fr will exist in the finally's block scope.

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