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This code snippet works as expected for the int type:

public class Test {
    public int Value
    {
        get { return _Value; }
        set
        {
            if (_Value != value)
            {
                _Value = value;
            }
        }
    }
    private int _Value;
}

When int is replaced by the generic T, the compiler complains with:

Operator '!=' cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T'

Why does this happen and is there a way to solve it?

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3  
Why don't they just use Equals() instead? What is the point of this post, it doesn't seem like a question... –  Robert Allan Hennigan Leahy Jan 24 '12 at 6:04
    
Since being edited, this might fly. The community is free to close it again, however .. and if that happens it will likely be permanent. –  Tim Post Jan 24 '12 at 9:33

3 Answers 3

using System.Collections.Generic;

public class Test<T>
{
     public T Value
     {
         get { return _Value; }
         set
         {
             if (!EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(_Value, value))
             {
                 _Value = value;
             }
         }
     }
     private T _Value;
}
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1  
I can't believe my answer survived a year and a half with no one pointing out the huge typo... –  Mehrdad Oct 21 '13 at 21:11
    
The year isn't that surprising, but that none of the 18 upvoters noticed is. –  CodesInChaos Oct 21 '13 at 21:11
5  
@CodesInChaos: Yeah I wonder how many people are using the wrong method in their code now... –  Mehrdad Oct 21 '13 at 21:14

T is a type argument and can be a class or a struct, Thus compiler won't let you perform actions that doesn't exist in classes and structs.

structs don't have the == and != by default(but can be added), this is why the compiler complains.

If you use the where keyword to add a constraint to the type argument, the Compiler will let you use that type\interface method\operators

constrain T to be a class

public class Test<T> where T : class
{
     public T Value
     {
         private T _Value;

         get { return _Value; }
         set
         {
             if (_value != value)
                 _Value = value;             
         }
     }
}

Or simply use Equals instead of the == operator

public class Test<T>
{
     public T Value
     {
         private T _Value;

         get { return _Value; }
         set
         {
             if (!_value.Equals(value)
                 _Value = value;             
         }
     }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
In your second example, if _value is null, you will throw a NullReferenceException. Best to use Mehrdad's example where you need to support structs. –  Sean Lynch Aug 15 '13 at 14:55
    
@SeanLynch, you are absolutely right, but it's just an example, it's need more work than simply copy & paste. –  gdoron Aug 15 '13 at 17:14

T can be any type. You cannot use ==/!= on structs, unless such operators are defined on the (struct) type.

share|improve this answer
    
Although not related to the question I found this helpful. –  Kian Aug 4 '12 at 13:10
    
It certainly is related to the question, at least now. –  ANeves Dec 10 '13 at 19:29

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