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Is it possibile to make grep show a maximum number of words before and after the match? For example, given the row

aaa bbb ccc ddd eee fff ggg hhh iii jjj kkk lll mmm nnn ooo ppp qqq rrr sss

I'd like grep not to return whole line, but only, say, 3 words before and after the match. for example, searching for 'iii', the result would be

fff ggg hhh iii jjj kkk lll

I've tried this but no result is returned:

grep -o '\w{0, 20}MY_SEARCH\w{0, 20}' *
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Can you please elaborate more on your question as to what you are intending to do? –  jaypal singh Jan 24 '12 at 6:14
    
I don't think grep can do that. You may have to write up a small script like this awk '{for(i=1;i<=NF;i++) if($i=="iii") {for(k=i-3;k<=i+3;k++) printf("%s ",$k)} print ""}' filename –  jaypal singh Jan 24 '12 at 6:28
    
I have modified the post with new script..Check that out –  Raghuram Jan 24 '12 at 7:16
    
You can modify your command to: grep -oP '(\w+ ){0,3}bbb( \w+){0,3}'. –  mohit6up Jan 24 '12 at 7:52

3 Answers 3

string='aaa bbb ccc ddd eee fff ggg hhh iii jjj kkk lll mmm nnn ooo ppp qqq rrr sss'

echo $string | grep -oP '(([a-zA-Z]+) ){0,3}iii( ([a-zA-Z]+)){0,3}'

If I've understood your question right, this should do it when the maximum number of words on either side are 3.

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I tried to convert the spaces to newlines and then use -A and -B option and then reconvert \n to space.

$ echo "aaa bbb ccc ddd eee fff ggg hhh iii jjj kkk lll mmm nnn ooo ppp qqq rrr sss" | tr ' ' '\n' | grep -A3 -B3 "iii" | tr '\n' ' '

op=> fff ggg hhh iii jjj kkk lll

I know its a crude approach but need to check any other better option is present.

I wrote a small shell script with this logic to handle multiple files. Check this

#!/bin/bash

for i in `find . -name "*.txt"`
do
    FNAME=$i
    MATCHED=""
    if grep "iii" $i > /dev/null 2>&1
    then
        MATCHED=`cat $i | tr ' ' '\n' | grep -A3 -B3 "iii" | tr '\n' ' '`
    fi

    if [ "$MATCHED" != "" ]
    then
        echo "$FNAME|$MATCHED"
    fi
done    
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thanks, this may work, but will it work when the output is not a single line but '*' and hence apply it to multiple files? –  pistacchio Jan 24 '12 at 6:36
    
since i play around with \n , i need to try this –  Raghuram Jan 24 '12 at 6:41
    
@pistacchio The awk one-liner posted in the comments can scan through multiple files. Though depending on the file size it may not be that efficient. –  jaypal singh Jan 24 '12 at 6:46
    
@Raghuram This will cause issues with filenames having spaces. You can do for i in /path/to/dir/*.txt instead. –  jaypal singh Jan 24 '12 at 7:55
grep -E -o '.{0, 3}iii.{0, 3}'

it will output this

hhh iii jjj

if you want to remove 'iii', you can also pipe a sed

grep -E -o '.{0,3}iii.{0,3}' | sed 's/iii//g'

it will output this

hhh jjj
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