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I'm trying to make my SQL Server table datetime columns save datetime with AM/PM. How to make SQL Server to save datetime with AM/PM format?

Right now it saves date like this: 2012-01-23 14:47:00.000 Is it possible to save it 2012-01-23 02:47:00.000 PM ??

Or does SQL Server save the date and time in this format (2012-01-23 14:47:00.000) all the time and I need to convert it just on output and input?

Is it even possible to save it in this format (2012-01-23 02:47:00.000 PM)? Or does SQL Server save datetime in 24 hour format?

thanks indeed for any help. sorry for language. ;)

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Internally the date and time are stored as a number.

Whether it's displayed in a 12 or 24 hour clock is up to the program formatting it for display.

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so you mean what in database the datetime field gonna look like this(2012-01-23 14:47:00.000) all the time. and its completely up to program settings how it will be displayed for end user? –  Mindaugas Jan 24 '12 at 7:36
3  
@Mindaugas No, it will look like 35565.34536426, and other tools interpret this number as date and time –  Oleg Dok Jan 24 '12 at 7:43

As Andrew said, Datetime format is stored not as string. so, you can use CONVERT function to get the datetime value in approprate format. for example,

SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR(20), GETDATE(), 100)

to learn more about datetime formatting, see this article

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AM/PM serves only for visualization, if you need to display them, use CONVERT keyword:

SELECT CONVERT(varchar, YourDateTimeField, 109)
FROM YourTable

If you need to store AM/PM - it is makes no sense for datetime type, use varchar type instead.

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