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F# provides a feature, where a function can return another function.

An example of function generating a function in F# is:

let powerFunctionGenarator baseNumber = (fun exponent -> baseNumber ** exponent);

let powerOfTwo = powerFunctionGenarator 2.0;

let powerOfThree = powerFunctionGenarator 3.0;

let power2 = powerOfTwo 10.0;
let power3 = powerOfThree 10.0;

printfn "%f" power2;
printfn "%f" power3;

The best way I could come up with to achieve the same in C# was this:

class Program
{
    delegate double PowerOf2(double exponent);
    delegate double PowerOf3(double exponent);
    delegate double PowerOfN(double n, double exponent);

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        PowerOfN powerOfN = (a, b) => { return Math.Pow(a,b) ; };
        PowerOf2 powerOf2 = (a) => { return powerOfN(2, a); };
        PowerOf3 powerOf3 = (a) => { return powerOfN(3, a); };

        double result = powerOf2(10);
        Console.WriteLine(result);
        result = powerOf3(10);
        Console.WriteLine(result);
    }
}

Is there some other way (/better way) of doing this?

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1  
Google for curry. –  leppie Jan 24 '12 at 7:45
    
I've never done that much currying in C#, but doesn't lambdas kinda limit the usefulness of currying? @Ngm; what is your reason for generating methods on the fly? –  flindeberg Jan 24 '12 at 8:04
    
No particular reason, just wanted to explore how it could be done. –  Ngm Jan 24 '12 at 8:40
1  
Note that all functions are curried in F#, so you could have equivalently written powerFunctionGenerator as let powerFunctionGenarator baseNumber exponent = baseNumber ** exponent –  Stephen Swensen Jan 24 '12 at 15:51
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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Sure, that's straightforward in C#:

using System;
class P
{
  static void Main()
  {
      Func<double, Func<double, double>> powerFunctionGenerator = 
          baseNumber => exponent => Math.Pow(baseNumber, exponent);  

      Func<double, double> powerOfTwo = powerFunctionGenerator(2.0);
      Func<double, double> powerOfThree = powerFunctionGenerator(3.0);
      double power2 = powerOfTwo(10.0); 
      double power3 = powerOfThree(10.0);
      Console.WriteLine(power2); 
      Console.WriteLine(power3);
  }
}

Easy peasy. And if you don't like the manifest typing, most of those can be replaced with var.

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You could also have the function as a parameter: Func<double, Func<double, double, double>, Func<double, double>> functionGenerator = (a, f) => b => f(a, b); var powOf2 = functionGenerator(2, PowerFunction); –  Paolo Tedesco Jan 24 '12 at 8:23
1  
My previous comment didn't look so horrible in Visual Studio... –  Paolo Tedesco Jan 24 '12 at 8:24
2  
Out of curiosity, have you ever seen some C# code that uses this to solve some practical task? I wrote my Curry/Uncurry functions in C# too, but it feels that the syntax would be just too confusing... –  Tomas Petricek Jan 24 '12 at 11:22
    
@TomasPetricek: Sure; for example, I once wrote an implementation of the A* pathfinding algorithm. The algorithm in general needs a function that can estimate the distance between two points, but for any particular run of the algorithm it needs a function that can estimate the distance between any point and one fixed point. You can use partial application to achieve that. –  Eric Lippert Jan 24 '12 at 14:39
1  
@EricLippert That definitely sounds like a nice application for partial function application. The reason why I'm not too convinced about using this in C# is that a declaration like Point[] AStar(Point[] points, Func<Point, Func<Point, float>> metric) is about 70 characters long. Not very netbook friendly :-). –  Tomas Petricek Jan 24 '12 at 17:51
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You could write a function to curry another function. The inconvenience is that you would have to create all the overloads you need.

An example:

using System;

class Program {

    static Func<T2, TRes> Curry<T1, T2, TRes>(Func<T1, T2, TRes> f, T1 t1) {
        return (t2) => f(t1, t2);
    }

    static double PowerFunction(double d1, double d2) {
        return Math.Pow(d1, d2);
    }

    static void Main(string[] args) {
        var powerOf2 = Curry<double, double, double>(PowerFunction, 2);
        double r = powerOf2(3);
    }
}
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I will have to explore more about "Curry". Thank you for the answer –  Ngm Jan 24 '12 at 8:50
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Almost literal translation of your original F# to C#:

Func<double,Func<double,double>> powerFunctionGenerator = 
    (baseNumber) => ((exponent) => Math.Pow(baseNumber, exponent));

var powerOfTwo = powerFunctionGenarator(2.0);

var powerOfThree = powerFunctionGenarator(3.0);

var power2 = powerOfTwo(10.0);
var power3 = powerOfThree(10.0);

Console.WriteLine(power2);
Console.WriteLine(power3);
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@Joey--Fixed now. –  sblom Jan 24 '12 at 8:08
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If what you're asking is how to rewrite powerFunctionGenarator into C#, you can do it in a pretty straightforward way:

Func<double, double> powerFunctionGenarator(double baseNumber)
{
    return exponent => Math.Pow(baseNumber, exponent);
}

You can't put the method declaration like this in inside another method in C#. But if you want to do that, you can use lambda in a lambda, as sblom suggested:

Func<double, Func<double, double>> powerFunctionGenerator =
    baseNumber => exponent => Math.Pow(baseNumber, exponent);

Which is equivalent to the following code in F#:

let powerFunctionGenarator = fun baseNumber -> (fun exponent -> baseNumber ** exponent)
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