Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let us say we have some code that looks like below:

@interface SomeClass : NSObject
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *someString;
@end

@implementation SomeClass
@synthesize someString;
-(id)init {
    if (self=[super init]) {
        someString = [NSString stringWithString:@"some string"];
    }
    return self;
}
@end

Am I supposed to release the someString property in the dealloc method of SomeClass, even if someString was set to autorelease and I never actually retained it in my init method? If so, I'd simply add [someString release] before [super dealloc] in the -release method. Correct?

Now the real issue I am having is that while using Cocos2D, I've reached a contradicting situation. My code looks like below:

@interface SomeLayer : CCLayer
@property (nonatomic, retain) CCSprite *someSprite;
@end

@implementation SomeLayer
@synthesize someSprite;
-(id)init {
    if (self=[super init]) {
        someSprite = [CCSprite spriteWithFile:@"SomeFile.png"];
        [self addChild:someSprite];
    }
    return self;
}
@end

Now, I have added someSprite as a child to my layer SomeLayer. So, what should I do to make sure I have no memory leaks here? I could think of the following:

  1. Obviously, I'd think of calling [someSprite release] in SomeLayer's -dealloc method. but it gives me EXC_BAD_ACCESS in [super dealloc] (the next line). Most likely because I didn't remove the child, and the superclass tries to access the child that I just released.
  2. I call [self removeChild:someSprite cleanup:YES] in the -dealloc method, which would remove the child and also release it. So I do not need to follow up with [someSprite release]. But hey, the -dealloc method of the superclass CCNode already does all that for me.
  3. I do nothing. I wouldn't override the -dealloc method at all. Well, this seems to work fine, but it contradicts the statement: "if you retain something, you're supposed to release it".

Any help on why I must release the object in case I, and why not in case II at an early stage would help save a lot of memory related issues in the long run.

Thanks

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
someString = [NSString stringWithString:@"some string"];

This is wrong. You are keeping a pointer to an autoreleased object that will disappear soon, and when you’ll try to use the someString pointer bad things will happen. You should use the accessor ([self setSomeString:…]), retain the autoreleased value (someString = [… retain]) or use a method that returns a retained value (someString = [[NSString alloc] init…]).

In your real use case you should do the same with the sprite, you are getting EXC_BAD_ACCESS because you over-release the sprite: you call release without ever retaining the value. Read the Cocoa Memory Management Guide, you will save yourself a lot of trouble in the long run.

By the way, I think your main problem is that you think that a simple assignment to the someString variable retains the assigned value. That is not the case (not without ARC, to be more precise). Assignment to the instance variable is just that, a plain assignment. If you want to go through the accessors, you have to send a message ([self setSomeString:…]) or use the dot notation (self.someString = …).

share|improve this answer
    
You were right about assigning to someString rather than self.someString. The underlying @synthesize code now retains the property for me and I can release it in the -dealloc method. Good to go :) –  Himanshu Jan 24 '12 at 9:06

You only have to release objects that you explicitly allocate. None of the examples you gave were allocated, so they are autoreleased. If you want to keep an autoreleased object for a long period of time, you need to retain it, and only then you would need to release the object.

Additionally, if you have properties you should set them to nil in viewDidUnload

self.someString = nil;

share|improve this answer
    
We should be very careful when talking about memory management, as it’s dangerously easy to over-simplify. It’s not really true that you only have to release what you allocate, there’s at least copying that does not fit the rule. –  zoul Jan 24 '12 at 8:53
    
@zoul The rule I've heard is summed up with NARC - New, Alloc, Retain, Copy. Any of those that you that use need to be explicitly released or autoreleased. The wrinkle is the "hidden" retain on self. accessors. –  Maple May 31 '13 at 19:09

You really need to read Memory Management Programming Guide.


There are two of four rules

  • You can take ownership of an object using retain.
  • When you no longer need it, you must relinquish ownership of an object you own

When you declare property as retain then you should call release for appropriate variable. In your case your dealloc should looks

- (void)dealloc
    [someSprite release];
    [super dealloc];
}

And look at this code

 if (self=[super init]) {
        someSprite = [CCSprite spriteWithFile:@"SomeFile.png"]; // here you assign pointer to new object
        [self addChild:someSprite]; // all right, you can use newly created object in this scope
    }
 // but here that object can be deleted from memory and someSprite can points to nothing

To avoid this you need to retain newly created sprite

someSprite = [[CCSprite spriteWithFile:@"SomeFile.png"] retain];
share|improve this answer
@synthesize someSprite;

this line makes the retain count of SomeSprite to 1 ..in dealloc you release it so retain is back to 0.. object release.

[CCSprite spriteWithFile:@"SomeFile.png"];

this is an autorelease object..

when you do

someSprite = [CCSprite spriteWithFile:@"SomeFile.png"];

you point someSprite to the autorelease object.. so both are now equal..

this line messes the whole point of synthesize(retain) ..so now change this line to

[self setsomeSprite] =[CCSprite spriteWithFile:@"SomeFile.png"];

now you just continue the way it was.. have someSprite release in the dealloc.. and everything will be good again

share|improve this answer
    
basically whenever you have made a variable as a property...you should do [self setVariable]= or self.variable = .. never simply do variable = ...since this way it messes with the memory allocation –  Shubhank Jan 24 '12 at 9:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.