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FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(gzipFile);
GZIPInputStream gis = new GZIPInputStream(fis);
gis.close();
fis.close();

Is fis.close() necessary? Though I'm running this code and don't seem to get any errors.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should see the implementation of GZIPInputStream.close().

/**
 * Closes this input stream and releases any system resources associated
 * with the stream.
 * @exception IOException if an I/O error has occurred
 */
public void close() throws IOException {
    if (!closed) {
        super.close();  
        eos = true;
        closed = true;
    }
}

If you take a look at the constructor for GZIPInputStream, it looks like this:

/**
 * Creates a new input stream with the specified buffer size.
 * @param in the input stream
 * @param size the input buffer size
 * @exception IOException if an I/O error has occurred
 * @exception IllegalArgumentException if size is <= 0
 */
public GZIPInputStream(InputStream in, int size) throws IOException {
super(in, new Inflater(true), size);
    usesDefaultInflater = true;
        readHeader(in);
}

Watch the variable in. Notice how it is being passed to the super class which is InflaterInputStream in this case.

Now, if we have a look at the implementation of InflaterInputStream.close() method, we will find this:

/**
 * Closes this input stream and releases any system resources associated
 * with the stream.
 * @exception IOException if an I/O error has occurred
 */
public void close() throws IOException {
    if (!closed) {
        if (usesDefaultInflater)
            inf.end();
    in.close();
        closed = true;
    }
}

Clearly, in.close() is being called. So the wrapped (decorated) FileInputStream is also closed on the call to GZIPInputStream.close(). Thich makes calling fis.close() redundant.

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1  
super isn't the FileInputStream, it's the close method of the superclass of GZIPInputStream. Nothing (directly) to do with the input arguument to the constructor. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 24 '12 at 9:18
    
I don't see it in the source you linked, but if you have a look at the implementation of super.close() you'll see a line in.close(); where in is the input stream that was passed to the constructor (fis in the OP's case). –  Thomas Jan 24 '12 at 9:19
    
In fact, it would seem that it is necessary. Calling super.close() does not mean closing the stream passed through parameter (in fact, you can be sure that super.close()does not make that, as it has not access to that attribute. –  SJuan76 Jan 24 '12 at 9:19
    
Yes, I agree on the fact that super isn't FileInputStream. But I will make the answer clearer. The wrapped stream is closed indirectly. –  adarshr Jan 24 '12 at 9:20
1  
Thank you so much! And I agree with @T.J.Crowder that the documentation is poor--because I even tried to look into it. –  OkonX Jan 24 '12 at 9:54

Yes, it does. The javadoc says:

Closes this input stream and releases any system resources associated with the stream.

And the wrapped stream is definitely such a system resource.

Moreover, GZIPInputStream is a FilterInputStream, and the FilterInputStream javadoc says:

Closes this input stream and releases any system resources associated with the stream. This method simply performs in.close().

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This is one of those things that people need to clearly document. Unfortunately, GZIPInputStream overrides the close in its parent class and doesn't document what it does (poor documentation). But the odds are pretty high (even without looking at the code) that it will eventually call super.close() (and indeed we can see from adarshr's answer that it does, although you should never assume the implementation isn't going to change). If so, then we look at the docs for the parent class (InflaterInputStream). Unfortunately, it does exactly the same thing, overrides without documenting. But assume that it, too, calls super.close() at some point. Looking at its parent class (FilterInputStream) docs, it explicitly says it does a close on the in member, which is set via the constructor. (A separate assumption is that GZIPInputStream and InflaterInputStream pass on the constructor argument to their superclasses, but that's very likely indeed.)

So FilterInputStream tells you clearly that it's going to close the stream you provide to the constructor. The odds are pretty high the others are going to call super.close(), even though they're poorly documented, so yes, it should close it for you and you shouldn't have to do it yourself. But there are some assumptions involved.

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