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I have a 4-column CSV file. I want to sort the lines, such that, the lines containing any number somewhere within the third column are pushed to the end of the document, lines without numbers in the third column are put to the beginning. How can I sort the file in this way?

Update:

To clarify, I need to move lines which contain any number (i.e. a match for [0-9]) somewhere within the letters of the third column (the third column of the line might contain other symbols). Spaces are not important. E.g.

dog, eats chicken, has 4 legs, does not like cats
cat, eats mice, has a tail, does not like water
mouse, eats bugs, has 4 legs, does not like cats
elephant, eats peanuts, has a trunk, does not like mice

Would be sorted to:

cat, eats mice, has a tail, does not like water
elephant, eats peanuts, has a trunk, does not like mice
dog, eats chicken, has 4 legs, does not like cats
mouse, eats bugs, has 4 legs, does not like cats
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This might work for you:

sed 'h;s/,/\n/2;s/.*\n/0/;s/,.*//;s/[^0-9]//g;G;s/\n/\t/' file | 
sort -k1,1n -k2 | 
cut -f2

Explanation:

  • Generate a numeric key using numbers from the 3rd column (if none set the key to 0)
  • Sort by the above key and then by the original file
  • Remove the numeric key
share|improve this answer
    
What is the meaning of | placed at the end of a line? –  Village Jan 24 '12 at 13:02
    
@Village it's the pipe command. It's a one line solution I've just split it up to make it easier to read, –  potong Jan 24 '12 at 13:08

This would work keeping the order in which lines were processed as well as no use of pipes and external commands.

awk -F, '
$3~/[0-9]+/{a[++i]=$0;x=i;next}1
END{for(i=1;i<=x;i++) print a[i]}' file

Input File:

[jaypal:~/Temp] cat file
dog, eats chicken, has 4 legs, does not like cats
cat, eats mice, has a tail, does not like water
mouse, eats bugs, has 4 legs, does not like cats
elephant, eats peanuts, has a trunk, does not like mice

Test:

[jaypal:~/Temp] awk -F, '
$3~/[0-9]+/{a[++i]=$0;x=i;next}1
END{for(i=1;i<=x;i++) print a[i]}' file
cat, eats mice, has a tail, does not like water
elephant, eats peanuts, has a trunk, does not like mice
dog, eats chicken, has 4 legs, does not like cats
mouse, eats bugs, has 4 legs, does not like cats
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I tried with awk and mawk, but get "line 1: syntax error at or near END" and "line 1: illegal reference to array a". –  Village Jan 25 '12 at 1:07
    
Thats odd … I tried with awk and gawk and it did not report any errors. Did you make any change in the script? –  jaypal singh Jan 25 '12 at 1:10
    
I didn't make any changes. –  Village Jan 25 '12 at 1:31
    
Sorry about that, looks like the length(a) reference is causing issue for your version of awk. Can you please try the updated solution. I have made a change to remove that function. –  jaypal singh Jan 25 '12 at 1:34

This is a short 1-liner in awk that does not require calling other utilities such as sort

awk -F',' '$3 ~ /[[:digit:]]/{a[$0];next}1; END{for(i in a)print i}' ./infile

Explanation

  • If the 3rd field contains a digit, store the current line as the key in array 'a' and process the next line
  • Output all lines as-is if they don't match the rule above
  • After all lines have been processed, output the lines that we stored in array 'a'

Output

$ awk -F',' '$3 ~ /[[:digit:]]/{a[$0];next}1; END{for(i in a)print i}' ./infile
cat, eats mice, has a tail, does not like water
elephant, eats peanuts, has a trunk, does not like mice
mouse, eats bugs, has 4 legs, does not like cats
dog, eats chicken, has 4 legs, does not like cats
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This code seems to only sort those lines that only contain numbers in the third row. I need to sort the lines that contain at least one number, but they might have other characters in the same cell. –  Village Jan 24 '12 at 12:32
    
Have you tried running it? It works just fine with your new example input. The regular expression $3 ~ /[[:digit:]]/ matches any third field which contains at least one digit, regardless of other content it main contain. –  SiegeX Jan 24 '12 at 16:51

Something like this should work:

awk 'BEGIN {FS=","; OFS=","}; {print match($3,/[0-9]/), $0}' <file> | sort | cut -d, -f2-

The strategy is to

  • use awk to insert at the beginning of each line the index in which a digit is found (or 0 if no digit is found)
  • use sort to sort all the lines
  • finally, use cut to remove the number that was prepended by awk.
share|improve this answer
    
I need to search for cells in the third column containing at least one number, not just cells that only contain numbers. –  Village Jan 24 '12 at 12:30
    
@Village I see, I've reworked my answer to take that in to account. –  jcollado Jan 24 '12 at 13:20

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