Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to print all the elements and attributes in an xml file. The xml file's contents are:

<topology>
<switch id="10">
    <port no="1">h1</port>
    <port no="2">h2</port>
</switch>

<tunnel id="91">
<port no="1">s1</port>
<port no="8">s8</port>
</tunnel>
</topology>

How do I do it? Also, how do I search for an element like switch inside topology?

share|improve this question
1  
Step 1 search. Python has several XML parsers already in the standard library. docs.python.org/library/markup.html What part of the standard library documentation is hard to read? Please choose one of the existing XML parsers, and follow the examples. When you get stuck, please ask a specific question about the parser your chose. –  S.Lott Jan 24 '12 at 10:45
    
That's a stilly question. There are several. They have different purposes. I've used them all. Please Read the documentation first before asking silly questions. –  S.Lott Jan 24 '12 at 10:48
1  
Please have a look at this link. It should be simple and clear. –  Frankline Jan 24 '12 at 10:49
    
@Bruce: Clearly. And I resent that. There's a lot to learn, and you need to actually learn it yourself. –  S.Lott Jan 24 '12 at 11:24
    
possible duplicate of Really simple way to deal with XML in Python? –  phihag Jan 24 '12 at 11:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Like S.Lott expressed, you have way too many ways to skin this cat,

here is an example using lxml,

from lxml import etree

xml_snippet = '''<topology>
 <switch id="10">
     <port no="1">h1</port>
     <port no="2">h2</port>
 </switch>

 <tunnel dpid="91">
 <port no="1">s1</port>
 <port no="8">s8</port>
 </tunnel>
 </topology>'''

root = etree.fromstring(xml_snippet)

for element in root.iter("*"):
  print element.tag, element.items()

output:

topology []
switch [('id', '10')]
port [('no', '1')]
port [('no', '2')]
tunnel [('dpid', '91')]
port [('no', '1')]
port [('no', '8')]

Using XPath to find an attribute

attribute = '10'
element = root.find('.//switch[@id="%s"]' % attribute)
element.items()

output:

[('id', '10')]
share|improve this answer

Here is my working code:

import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET

doc = ET.parse("nm.xml")
s = doc.find("switch")
print s.attrib["id"]
for item in s:
  print item.attrib["no"]
  print item.text

t = doc.find("tunnel")
print t.attrib["dpid"]
for item in t:
  print item.attrib["no"]
  print item.text  

P.S: You can replace ET.parse with ET.fromstring and change input argument to a string type It works

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.