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I have a command object:

public class Job {
    private String jobType;
    private String location;
}

Which is bound by spring-mvc:

@RequestMapping("/foo")
public Strnig doSomethingWithJob(Job job) {
   ...
}

Which works fine for http://example.com/foo?jobType=permanent&location=Stockholm. But now I need to make it work for the following url instead:
http://example.com/foo?jt=permanent&loc=Stockholm

Obviously, I don't want to change my command object, because the field names have to remain long (as they are used in the code). How can I customize that? Is there an option to do something like this:

public class Job {
    @RequestParam("jt")
    private String jobType;
    @RequestParam("loc")
    private String location;
}

This doesn't work (@RequestParam can't be applied to fields).

The thing I'm thinking about is a custom message converter similar to FormHttpMessageConverter and read a custom annotation on the target object

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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here's what I got working:

First, a parameter resolver:

/**
 * This resolver handles command objects annotated with @SupportsAnnotationParameterResolution
 * that are passed as parameters to controller methods.
 * 
 * It parses @CommandPerameter annotations on command objects to
 * populate the Binder with the appropriate values (that is, the filed names
 * corresponding to the GET parameters)
 * 
 * In order to achieve this, small pieces of code are copied from spring-mvc
 * classes (indicated in-place). The alternative to the copied lines would be to
 * have a decorator around the Binder, but that would be more tedious, and still
 * some methods would need to be copied.
 * 
 * @author bozho
 * 
 */
public class AnnotationServletModelAttributeResolver extends ServletModelAttributeMethodProcessor {

    /**
     * A map caching annotation definitions of command objects (@CommandParameter-to-fieldname mappings)
     */
    private ConcurrentMap<Class<?>, Map<String, String>> definitionsCache = Maps.newConcurrentMap();

    public AnnotationServletModelAttributeResolver(boolean annotationNotRequired) {
        super(annotationNotRequired);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean supportsParameter(MethodParameter parameter) {
        if (parameter.getParameterType().isAnnotationPresent(SupportsAnnotationParameterResolution.class)) {
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    protected void bindRequestParameters(WebDataBinder binder, NativeWebRequest request) {
        ServletRequest servletRequest = request.getNativeRequest(ServletRequest.class);
        ServletRequestDataBinder servletBinder = (ServletRequestDataBinder) binder;
        bind(servletRequest, servletBinder);
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public void bind(ServletRequest request, ServletRequestDataBinder binder) {
        Map<String, ?> propertyValues = parsePropertyValues(request, binder);
        MutablePropertyValues mpvs = new MutablePropertyValues(propertyValues);
        MultipartRequest multipartRequest = WebUtils.getNativeRequest(request, MultipartRequest.class);
        if (multipartRequest != null) {
            bindMultipart(multipartRequest.getMultiFileMap(), mpvs);
        }

        // two lines copied from ExtendedServletRequestDataBinder
        String attr = HandlerMapping.URI_TEMPLATE_VARIABLES_ATTRIBUTE;
        mpvs.addPropertyValues((Map<String, String>) request.getAttribute(attr));
        binder.bind(mpvs);
    }

    private Map<String, ?> parsePropertyValues(ServletRequest request, ServletRequestDataBinder binder) {

        // similar to WebUtils.getParametersStartingWith(..) (prefixes not supported)
        Map<String, Object> params = Maps.newTreeMap();
        Assert.notNull(request, "Request must not be null");
        Enumeration<?> paramNames = request.getParameterNames();
        Map<String, String> parameterMappings = getParameterMappings(binder);
        while (paramNames != null && paramNames.hasMoreElements()) {
            String paramName = (String) paramNames.nextElement();
            String[] values = request.getParameterValues(paramName);

            String fieldName = parameterMappings.get(paramName);
            // no annotation exists, use the default - the param name=field name
            if (fieldName == null) {
                fieldName = paramName;
            }

            if (values == null || values.length == 0) {
                // Do nothing, no values found at all.
            } else if (values.length > 1) {
                params.put(fieldName, values);
            } else {
                params.put(fieldName, values[0]);
            }
        }

        return params;
    }

    /**
     * Gets a mapping between request parameter names and field names.
     * If no annotation is specified, no entry is added
     * @return
     */
    private Map<String, String> getParameterMappings(ServletRequestDataBinder binder) {
        Class<?> targetClass = binder.getTarget().getClass();
        Map<String, String> map = definitionsCache.get(targetClass);
        if (map == null) {
            Field[] fields = targetClass.getDeclaredFields();
            map = Maps.newHashMapWithExpectedSize(fields.length);
            for (Field field : fields) {
                CommandParameter annotation = field.getAnnotation(CommandParameter.class);
                if (annotation != null && !annotation.value().isEmpty()) {
                    map.put(annotation.value(), field.getName());
                }
            }
            definitionsCache.putIfAbsent(targetClass, map);
            return map;
        } else {
            return map;
        }
    }

    /**
     * Copied from WebDataBinder.
     * 
     * @param multipartFiles
     * @param mpvs
     */
    protected void bindMultipart(Map<String, List<MultipartFile>> multipartFiles, MutablePropertyValues mpvs) {
        for (Map.Entry<String, List<MultipartFile>> entry : multipartFiles.entrySet()) {
            String key = entry.getKey();
            List<MultipartFile> values = entry.getValue();
            if (values.size() == 1) {
                MultipartFile value = values.get(0);
                if (!value.isEmpty()) {
                    mpvs.add(key, value);
                }
            } else {
                mpvs.add(key, values);
            }
        }
    }
}

And then registering the parameter resolver using a post-processor. It should be registered as a <bean>:

/**
 * Post-processor to be used if any modifications to the handler adapter need to be made
 * 
 * @author bozho
 *
 */
public class AnnotationHandlerMappingPostProcessor implements BeanPostProcessor {

    @Override
    public Object postProcessAfterInitialization(Object bean, String arg1)
            throws BeansException {
        return bean;
    }

    @Override
    public Object postProcessBeforeInitialization(Object bean, String arg1)
            throws BeansException {
        if (bean instanceof RequestMappingHandlerAdapter) {
            RequestMappingHandlerAdapter adapter = (RequestMappingHandlerAdapter) bean;
            List<HandlerMethodArgumentResolver> resolvers = adapter.getCustomArgumentResolvers();
            if (resolvers == null) {
                resolvers = Lists.newArrayList();
            }
            resolvers.add(new AnnotationServletModelAttributeResolver(false));
            adapter.setCustomArgumentResolvers(resolvers);
        }

        return bean;
    }

}
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It would be very helpful having an complete example of this, as Im not able to build the example above. –  Ismar Slomic Dec 12 '13 at 22:15
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In Spring 3.1, ServletRequestDataBinder provides a hook for additional bind values:

protected void addBindValues(MutablePropertyValues mpvs, ServletRequest request) {
}

The ExtendedServletRequestDataBinder subclass uses it to add URI template variables as binding values. You could extend it further to make it possible to add command-specific field aliases.

You can override RequestMappingHandlerAdapter.createDataBinderFactory(..) to provide a custom WebDataBinder instance. From a controller's perspective it could look like this:

@InitBinder
public void initBinder(MyWebDataBinder binder) {
   binder.addFieldAlias("jobType", "jt");
   // ...
}
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Thanks, but if I need to override .createDtaBinderFactory, this means I should replace the RequestMappingHandlerAdapter, which means that I can't use <mvc:annotation-driven />, right? –  Bozho Jan 30 '12 at 21:50
    
You're welcome. Yes, with <mvc:annotation-driven /> you can't plug a custom RequestMappingHandlerMapping. You can do it quite easily with the MVC Java config however. –  Rossen Stoyanchev Feb 10 '12 at 13:56
    
@RossenStoyanchev: can you explain how can I plug in custom MyWebDataBinder with @EnableWebMvc? I see I have to subclass ExtendedServletRequestDataBinder and return it by subclassing ServletRequestDataBinderFactory. Now I can return this new factory by subclassing RequestMappingHandlerAdapter and overriding createDataBinderFactory(). But how can I force Spring MVC to use my subclassed RequestMappingHandlerAdapter? It is created in WebMvcConfigurationSupport... –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Mar 8 '12 at 22:42
1  
@TomaszNurkiewicz, maybe you figured this out but if not see the section on advanced Java of XML-based Spring MVC configuration in the reference docs .. static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.1.x/… –  Rossen Stoyanchev Apr 16 '12 at 18:21
    
@RossenStoyanchev: actually it wasn't urgent but thanks for your suggestion, it finally works, +1! –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Apr 21 '12 at 21:45
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This solution more concise but requires using RequestMappingHandlerAdapter, which Spring use when <mvc:annotation-driven /> enabled. Hope it will help somebody. The idea is to extend ServletRequestDataBinder like this:

 /**
 * ServletRequestDataBinder which supports fields renaming using {@link ParamName}
 *
 * @author jkee
 */
public class ParamNameDataBinder extends ExtendedServletRequestDataBinder {

    private final Map<String, String> renameMapping;

    public ParamNameDataBinder(Object target, String objectName, Map<String, String> renameMapping) {
        super(target, objectName);
        this.renameMapping = renameMapping;
    }

    @Override
    protected void addBindValues(MutablePropertyValues mpvs, ServletRequest request) {
        super.addBindValues(mpvs, request);
        for (Map.Entry<String, String> entry : renameMapping.entrySet()) {
            String from = entry.getKey();
            String to = entry.getValue();
            if (mpvs.contains(from)) {
                mpvs.add(to, mpvs.getPropertyValue(from).getValue());
            }
        }
    }
}

Appropriate processor:

/**
 * Method processor supports {@link ParamName} parameters renaming
 *
 * @author jkee
 */

public class RenamingProcessor extends ServletModelAttributeMethodProcessor {

    @Autowired
    private RequestMappingHandlerAdapter requestMappingHandlerAdapter;

    //Rename cache
    private final Map<Class<?>, Map<String, String>> replaceMap = new ConcurrentHashMap<Class<?>, Map<String, String>>();

    public RenamingProcessor(boolean annotationNotRequired) {
        super(annotationNotRequired);
    }

    @Override
    protected void bindRequestParameters(WebDataBinder binder, NativeWebRequest nativeWebRequest) {
        Object target = binder.getTarget();
        Class<?> targetClass = target.getClass();
        if (!replaceMap.containsKey(targetClass)) {
            Map<String, String> mapping = analyzeClass(targetClass);
            replaceMap.put(targetClass, mapping);
        }
        Map<String, String> mapping = replaceMap.get(targetClass);
        ParamNameDataBinder paramNameDataBinder = new ParamNameDataBinder(target, binder.getObjectName(), mapping);
        requestMappingHandlerAdapter.getWebBindingInitializer().initBinder(paramNameDataBinder, nativeWebRequest);
        super.bindRequestParameters(paramNameDataBinder, nativeWebRequest);
    }

    private static Map<String, String> analyzeClass(Class<?> targetClass) {
        Field[] fields = targetClass.getDeclaredFields();
        Map<String, String> renameMap = new HashMap<String, String>();
        for (Field field : fields) {
            ParamName paramNameAnnotation = field.getAnnotation(ParamName.class);
            if (paramNameAnnotation != null && !paramNameAnnotation.value().isEmpty()) {
                renameMap.put(paramNameAnnotation.value(), field.getName());
            }
        }
        if (renameMap.isEmpty()) return Collections.emptyMap();
        return renameMap;
    }
}

Annotation:

/**
 * Overrides parameter name
 * @author jkee
 */

@Target(ElementType.FIELD)
@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Documented
public @interface ParamName {

    /**
     * The name of the request parameter to bind to.
     */
    String value();

}

Spring config:

<mvc:annotation-driven>
    <mvc:argument-resolvers>
        <bean class="ru.yandex.metrika.util.params.RenamingProcessor">
            <constructor-arg name="annotationNotRequired" value="true"/>
        </bean>
    </mvc:argument-resolvers>
</mvc:annotation-driven> 

And finally, usage (like Bozho solution):

public class Job {
    @ParamName("job-type")
    private String jobType;
    @ParamName("loc")
    private String location;
}
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I would like to point you to another direction. But I do not know if it works.

I would try to manipulate the binding itself.

It is done by WebDataBinder and will be invoked from HandlerMethodInvoker method Object[] resolveHandlerArguments(Method handlerMethod, Object handler, NativeWebRequest webRequest, ExtendedModelMap implicitModel) throws Exception

I have no deep look in Spring 3.1, but what I have seen, is that this part of Spring has been changed a lot. So it is may possible to exchange the WebDataBinder. In Spring 3.0 it seams not possible without overriding the HandlerMethodInvoker.

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Yup, that's where I'm investigating right now. I think I have a working solution, which I'll test tomorrow –  Bozho Jan 24 '12 at 17:27
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Try intercepting request using InterceptorAdaptor, and then using simple checking mechanism decide whether to foward the request to the controller handler. Also wrap HttpServletRequestWrapper around the request, to enable you override the requests getParameter().

This way you can repass the actual parameter name and its value back to the request to be seen by the controller.

Example option:

public class JobInterceptor extends HandlerInterceptorAdapter {
 private static final String requestLocations[]={"rt", "jobType"};

 private boolean isEmpty(String arg)
 {
   return (arg !=null && arg.length() > 0);
 }

 public boolean preHandle(HttpServletRequest request,
   HttpServletResponse response, Object handler) throws Exception {

   //Maybe something like this
   if(!isEmpty(request.getParameter(requestLocations[0]))|| !isEmpty(request.getParameter(requestLocations[1]))
   {
    final String value =
       !isEmpty(request.getParameter(requestLocations[0])) ? request.getParameter(requestLocations[0]) : !isEmpty(request
        .getParameter(requestLocations[1])) ? request.getParameter(requestLocations[1]) : null;

    HttpServletRequest wrapper = new HttpServletRequestWrapper(request)
    {
     public String getParameter(String name)
     {
      super.getParameterMap().put("JobType", value);
      return super.getParameter(name);
     }
    };

    //Accepted request - Handler should carry on.
    return super.preHandle(request, response, handler);
   }

   //Ignore request if above condition was false
   return false;
   }
 }

Finally wrap the HandlerInterceptorAdaptor around your controller handler as shown below. The SelectedAnnotationHandlerMapping allows you to specify which handler will be interecepted.

<bean id="jobInterceptor" class="mypackage.JobInterceptor"/>
<bean id="publicMapper" class="org.springplugins.web.SelectedAnnotationHandlerMapping">
    <property name="urls">
        <list>
            <value>/foo</value>
        </list>
    </property>
    <property name="interceptors">
        <list>
            <ref bean="jobInterceptor"/>
        </list>
    </property>
</bean>

EDITED.

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the target method is just 1, and it takes a Job object as argument. these strings are parameters, rather than locations –  Bozho Jan 24 '12 at 12:54
    
The handler method takes the Job object which is the same object held by the preHandle method. Therefore checking your request parameter as shown above and returning true will cause the controller handler to proceed with the request. –  Bitmap Jan 24 '12 at 13:04
    
I have edited the post to show how to intercept your job handler. –  Bitmap Jan 24 '12 at 13:14
    
still, how would that set the proper parameters on the Job object? –  Bozho Jan 24 '12 at 14:09
    
See edited answer - may be this might help. Wrap 'HttpServletRequestWrapper' around the request to enable you repass the parameter name and the value associated to it. –  Bitmap Jan 24 '12 at 17:19
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there is no nice built in way to do it, you can only choose which workaround you apply. The difference between handling

@RequestMapping("/foo")
public String doSomethingWithJob(Job job)

and

@RequestMapping("/foo")
public String doSomethingWithJob(String stringjob)

is that job is a bean and stringjob isn't (no surprise so far). The real difference is that beans are resolved with the standard Spring bean resolver mechanism, while string params are resolved by spring MVC that knows the concept of the @RequestParam annotation. To make the long story short there is no way in the standard spring bean resolution (that is using classes like PropertyValues, PropertyValue, GenericTypeAwarePropertyDescriptor) to resolve "jt" to a property called "jobType" or at least I dont know about it.

The workarounds coud be as others suggested to add a custom PropertyEditor or a filter, but I think it just messes up the code. In my opinion the cleanest solution would be to declare a class like this :

public class JobParam extends Job {
    public String getJt() {
         return super.job;
    }

    public void setJt(String jt) {
         super.job = jt;
    }

}

then use that in your controller

@RequestMapping("/foo")
public String doSomethingWithJob(JobParam job) {
   ...
}

UPDATE :

A slightly simpler option is to not to extend, just add the extra getters, setters to the original class

public class Job {

    private String jobType;
    private String location;

    public String getJt() {
         return jobType;
    }

    public void setJt(String jt) {
         jobType = jt;
    }

}
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that would work, but it's a but ugly :) –  Bozho Jan 24 '12 at 17:26
    
@Bozho yes it is not too sophisticated, but easy to read at least :) (I updated the original post with a simplified solution) –  Peter Szanto Jan 24 '12 at 20:46
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