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Got a task to make a program that registers animals and the object is to get familiar with inheritance, polymorphism and so on.

One thing that pussles me is no matter how much I read about it just seems pointless.

I create my main class which is animal with some generic fields that apply to all animals lets say name, age and species.

So far so good all animals has this info but every animal has a unique field aswell so ill create my cat as public class cat : animal and give the cat the field teeth for example.

Now I want to make a new animal which is a cat, im taking data from several listboxes so I would need a constructor that takes those parameters and this is what I dont get, do I have to declare them in every child class aswell?

I know that my animal should have 3 parameters from the animal class plus another from the cat class so the new cat should accept (name, age, species, teeth) but it seems that I have to tell the constructor in the cat class to accept all of these and theres my question, what purpose does the animal class serve? If I still need to write the code in all subclasses why have the base class? Probably me not getting it but the more I read the more confused I become.

share|improve this question
1  
You've confused yourself with your example. For instance - Do only cats have teeth, or do all animals? Lets for the sake of argument say all animals do (a mostly correct statement) - then shouldn't teeth be part of your base class? – Russell Troywest Jan 24 '12 at 12:22
    
Well that was just an example, I will have multiple categorys and species and every specie will have a unique field but lets change that to whiskers then :p. – Gvs Jan 24 '12 at 12:39
    
@user1083543: It seems like this is some kind of homework / class assignment. For that reason, there may be many advantages of Inheritance that this particular assignment won't cause you to leverage. But the point of the assignment is to familiarize you with inheritance so that when you actually do need it, you can use it. – xbonez Jan 24 '12 at 13:47

11 Answers 11

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Like Sergey said, its not only about constructors. It saves you having to initialize the same fields over and over. For example,

Without inheritance

class Cat
{
    float height;
    float weight;
    float energy;
    string breed;

    int somethingSpecificToCat;

    public Cat()
    {
        //your constructor. initialize all fields
    }

    public Eat()
    {
        energy++;
        weight++;
    }

    public Attack()
    {
        energy--;
        weight--;
    }   

}

class Dog
{
    float height;
    float weight;
    float energy;
    string breed;

    int somethingSpecificToDog;

    public Dog()
    {
        //your constructor. initialize all fields
    }

    public Eat()
    {
        energy++;
        weight++;
    }

    public Attack()
    {
        energy--;
        weight--;
    }   

}

With Inheritance

Everything common to animals gets moved to the base class. This way, when you want to setup a new animal, you don't need to type it all out again.

abstract class Animal
{
    float height;
    float weight;
    float energy;
    string breed;

    public Eat()
    {
        energy++;
        weight++;
    }

    public Attack()
    {
        energy--;
        weight--;
    }   
}
class Cat : Animal
{   
    int somethingSpecificToCat;

    public Cat()
    {
        //your constructor. initialize all fields
    }   
}

class Dog : Animal
{   
    int somethingSpecificToDog;

    public Dog()
    {
        //your constructor. initialize all fields
    }   
}

Another advantage is, if you want to tag every animal with a unique ID, you don't need to include that in each constructor and keep a global variable of the last ID used. You can easily do that in the Animal constructor since it will be invoked everytime the a derived class is instantiated.

Example

abstract class Animal
{
    static int sID = 0;

    float height;
    float weight;
    int id;

    public Animal()
    {
        id = ++sID;
    }
}

Now when you do;

Dog lassie = new Dog();  //gets ID = 1
Cat garfield = new Cat(); // gets ID = 2

If you want a list of all Animals in your 'farm',

without inheritance

List<Cat> cats = new List<Cat>();   //list of all cats
List<Dog> dogs = new List<Dog>(); //list of all dogs
...etc

With inheritance

List<Animal> animals = new List<Animal>();  //maintain a single list with all animals
animals.Add(lassie as Animal);
animals.Add(garfield as Animal);

This way, if you want to see if you have an animal called Pluto, you just need to iterate over a single list (animals) rather than multiple lists (Cats, Dogs, Pigs etc.)

EDIT in response to your comment

You don't need to instantiate Animal. You simply create an object of whichever Animal you want to. In fact, since an Animal will never be a generic Animal, you can create Animal as an abstract class.

abstract class Animal
{
    float height;
    float weight;
    float energy;
    string breed;

    public Eat()
    {
        energy++;
        weight++;
    }

    public Attack()
    {
        energy--;
        weight--;
    }   
}
class Cat : Animal
{   
    int somethingSpecificToCat;

    public Cat()
    {
        //your constructor. initialize all fields
    }   
}

class Dog : Animal
{   
    int somethingSpecificToDog;

    public Dog()
    {
        //your constructor. initialize all fields
    }   
}

Cat garfield = new Cat();
garfield.height = 24.5;
garfield.weight = 999; //he's a fat cat
//as you can see, you just instantiate the object garfield
//and instantly have access to all members of Animal

Animal jerry = new Animal(); //throws error
//you cannot create an object of type Animal
//since Animal is an abstract class. In this example
//the right way would be to create a class Mouse deriving from animal and then doing

Mouse jerry = new Mouse();

Edit to your comment

If you store it in a list of Animals, you still have access to all fields. You just have to cast it back to its original type.

List<Animal> animals = new List<Animal>();
animals.Add(garfield as Animal);
animals.Add(lassie as Animal);

//if you do not cast, you cannot access fields that were specific to the derived class.
Console.WriteLine(animals[0].height);   //this is valid. Prints Garfield's height
Console.WriteLine(animals[0].somethingSpecificToCat); //invalid since you haven't casted
Console.WriteLine((animals[0] as Cat).somethingSpecificToCat); //now it is valid

//if you want to do it in a loop

foreach(Animal animal in animals)
{
    //GetType() returns the derived class that the particular animal was casted FROM earlier

    if(animal is Cat)
    {
        //the animal is a cat
        Cat garfield = animal as Cat;
        garfield.height;
        garfield.somethingSpecificToCat;
    }
    else if (animal is Dog)
    {
        //animal is a dog
        Dog lassie = animal as Dog;
        lassie.height;
        lassie.somethingSpecificToDog;
    }   
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well for the next question then :p. My animal class should get its values from my form but how do I call that? First instantiating a new animal with the parameters then call to make a new Cat after? – Gvs Jan 24 '12 at 17:04
    
@user1083543: You don't need to ever instantiate animal. You just instantiate a cat or a dog. In fact, if your animal will always be a specific type of animal and not just a generic Animal, you should use the keyword abstract on the base class Animal. This ensures you cannot create an object of type Animal. See the edit I am making to the answer to better explain. – xbonez Jan 24 '12 at 17:21
    
Thanks a million for explaining it so clearly, really appreciated. – Gvs Jan 24 '12 at 17:32
    
Well one more if anyone is still checking this, if I ceate a List<Animal> doesnt that only hold the fields defined in the animal class then? So my specific fields for subclasses arent saved in it? – Gvs Jan 25 '12 at 18:12
    
@sek: See edit. – xbonez Jan 25 '12 at 18:45

You probably need to bare in mind that the example you are working through is extremely simple. If you need some complex method to determine one of the base class values you wouldn't want to be writing/replicating this in multiple classes as this would become tedious and make maintenance of the code a nightmare, in these types of situations the declaration of a few params in a constructor becomes trivial.

share|improve this answer

The benefit is that you dont have to declare the name age species in every type of animal. You get them pre-made for you. Another great point that inheritance lets you do is. Lets say you want to have an array of animals. So you type something like . Arraylist arr = etc etc... but this will only hold cat type objects. So instead you can do something like Arraylist and this will hold all types of animals, cats and dogs. Basically a variable of a base class can point to a variable of a derived class. This comes real handy in most scenarios, as things get complicated.

share|improve this answer
    
See this is what I dont get, maybe its me thats a lousy describer but essentialy this is the task ive gotten: I get name, age and species from textboxes or listboxes and then I need to "make" an animal of it. Lets say I chose cat as specie then I want to create an animal with the unique data for a cat. Next time Ill add a fish with its unique data and so on, only thing that will ever differ is the unique data about every specie that will be contained in a subclass of the base class animal. – Gvs Jan 24 '12 at 12:40
    
then your constructor will only call the base constructor with the common values and the specific object will allocate the value in the derived constructor – Kshitij Banerjee Jan 24 '12 at 12:58

You need to tell the contructor to take the arguments (if you wan't to require them), but you do not need to implement the properties again:

public class Animal
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public Animal(string Name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }
}

public class Cat : Animal
{
    public int Teeth { get; set; }

    public Cat(string name, int teeth)
    {
        Name = name; //<-- got from base
        Teeth = teeth; //<-- defined localy
    }
    //or do this
    public Cat(string name, int teeth) : base(name)
    {
        Teeth = teeth;
    }
}

You can also do the following:

Cat cat = new Cat("cat", 12);
Animal kitty = cat as Animal;

Which makes sense e.g. if you want a list like List<Animal> you can add a Cat-instance:

List<Animal> animals = new List<Animal>();
animals.Add(new Animal("Coco"));
animals.Add(cat);

foreach(Animal animal in animals)
{
    Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Name: {0}", animal.Name));
    if(animal is Cat)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0} is a Cat with {1} teeth.", animal.Name
            (animal as Cat).Teeth));
    }
    Console.WriteLine("============");
}

which will output:

Name: Coco
============
Name: cat
cat is a Cat with 12 teeth.
============
share|improve this answer

Inheritance is not about constructors only. For example, in your base class Animal you can declare method Eat(something) or Grow() which will be equal for all the successors.

BTW, no problem is in calling default Cat() constructor with just three parameters (so calling the base Animal constructor) and then specifying teeth by setting appropriate field or property.

share|improve this answer
    
Effectively making inheritance only useful if I have a method that applys to all animals like speak() for example? – Gvs Jan 24 '12 at 12:24
    
Yes, sure. But this is extremely common case. You might also find this article useful: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/27db6csx%28v=vs.71%29.aspx – Sergey Kudriavtsev Jan 24 '12 at 12:26

I don't know if the following information will be of any use for you but I thought it'd be worth mentioning as a use of inheritance. One of the many uses of inheritance, or to be more specific, a super class is that you can put them in the same collection:

List<Animal> animals = new List<Animal>();

animals.Add(new Cat());
animals.Add(new Dog());

etc. etc.

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Don't forget you can just pass constructor params to the base contructor too. You don't have to init them all in every derived class.

eg (stealing chrfin's code):

public class Animal
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Cat : Animal
{
    public int Teeth { get; set; }

    public Cat(string name, int teeth) : Base(name) //pass name to base constructor
    {
        Teeth = teeth;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just added the same to my answer (without reading yours first) :D – ChrFin Jan 24 '12 at 12:37

You're totally overthinking this.

what purpose does the animal class serve?

Your scenario is really, really simple. Try to think of it this way: the more common the feature is, the higher in the hierarchy it should be placed. Why? Simply to avoid duplication and redundancy. Imagine having few additional classes: dog, horse and frog. Since cat, dog and horse are mammals, you could as well create a class mammal defining shared mammals' features. Why? For example to avoid writing the same constructors, fields, methods for the similar species. In your case try to think of your animal class as of a repository of features common to all animals.

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Yes you will have to create the constructors, but that doesn't make inheritance pointless, although it is actually a good design practice to prefer composition over inheritance, that is generally (not always) it is better to have a cat that HAS-A animal property than a cat that IS-A animal.

Going back to inheritance, when it really pays off, since there are some attributes that all your animals will have think maybe, legs, ears, head, and by using inheritance you will not have to declare those properties in every class you create.

Also with inheritance you can use polymorphism, say you have this class (pseudo-code)

public abstract class Animal()
{
    //Some atributes

    //Methods

    makeSound();
}

then you have

public class Cat extends Animal
{
   makeSound()
  { 
     System.out.println("meow");
  }
}

Then say you extend Animal for dog also:

public class Dog extends Animal
{
   makeSound()
   {
       System.out.println("woof")
    }
}

Now say you have an array declared like this:

List<Animal> animals = new ArrayList<Animal>();
animals.add(cat);
animals.add(dog);

Then say you want each animal to make his sound then you can use polymorphism, and that will make each implementation call its makeSound method:

for (Animals animal : animals)
{
    animal.makeSound();
}

And that will print for the cat "meow"

and for the dog

"woof"

share|improve this answer

Inheritance allows you to write code that is shared between classes so that you put common functionality/data within a base class and have other classes derive from it. To use your example:

class Animal
{
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public Animal(string name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }

}

class Cat : Animal
{
    // Put cat-only properties here...

    public Cat(string name) : base(name)
    {
        // Set cat-specific properties here...
    }
}

You don't even need to supply the same amount of parameters to each class constructor - if a cat doesn't have a name (for a contrived example) just create a Cat constructor with no parameters and pass in something suitable to the base constructor. This allows you to control how all the animal classes are setup.

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You are getting confused because you are thinking only about constructors. The fact is as explained in msdn, "Constructors and Destructors are not inherited". So when you inherit you a class the base class constructors do not apply to derived class. Derived class has to mention its own set of construtor/destructor. To understand why this is so you might look here: Why are constructors not inherited?.

Now coming to your question, Yes you have to add a constructor in your cat class to accept all the four parameters. But you need not have to implement those 3 fields again in your cat class. All public protected and internal fields and methods of your animal class are still available to your cat class and you do not have to reimplement them in your derived class. This is how your base class is serving your derived class.

share|improve this answer
    
But how does that work when the parameters for the animal class are passes from a form? I want to create a cat which should inherit the fields from animal but the animal class doesnt have values yet as they are passed from the form? So how do the animal class know what values are in my form if I want to create a cat and not an animal? – Gvs Jan 24 '12 at 14:40
    
In inheritance, parent class will not be aware of derived class. So animal class will not be aware of cat or dog class. Also you can't expect c# to decide which class it should instantiate. Based on the values selected in the form you have to write a program which will create an object of appropriate class. Then assign the values from the form to appropriate fields of your object. This has to be explicitly done by you. – Rakesh Jan 25 '12 at 8:52

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