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I'm having a real difficult time getting this code to work. I'm trying to pass an array by reference to a function, in order to modify it in that function. Then I need the modifications to be handed back to the original caller function.

I have searched here for a similar problem, but couldn't find anything that can run successfully like the way I want to do it.

Here's my code, I would really appreciate any help. Thanks a lot:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define SIZE_OF_VALUES 5
#define SIZE_OF_STRING 100

void set_values(char **values);

void set_values(char **values)
{
    *values = malloc(sizeof(char)*SIZE_OF_VALUES);
    for (int i = 0; i < (sizeof(char)*SIZE_OF_VALUES); i++) {
        values[i] = malloc(sizeof(char)*SIZE_OF_STRING);
        values[i] = "Hello";
        //puts(values[i]); //It works fine here.
    }
}

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    char *values;
    set_values(&values);

    for (int i = 0; i < (sizeof(char)*SIZE_OF_VALUES); i++) {
        puts(values[i]); //It does not work!
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
you are trying to create an array of arrays, so "values" should be a pointer to pointer (char **value). –  Renan Greinert Jan 24 '12 at 12:36
    
Thanks for your reply, I've changed to (char **values) and removed the (&) reference, the code still doesn't work –  Mark Johnson Jan 24 '12 at 12:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are several problems with your code:

  1. You should have three-level pointers - void set_values(char ***values), read it as a "a reference (first *) to an array (second *) of char* (third *)"

  2. Each element in *values should be a pointer (char*) not char, so you need:

    *values = malloc(sizeof(char*)*SIZE_OF_VALUES);
    
  3. You are leaking memory, first mallocing then assigning literal, and additionally not dereferencing values, you need either:

    (*values)[i] = "Hello";
    

    or

    (*values)[i] = strdup("Hello");  // you will have to free it later
    

    or

    (*values)[i] = malloc(sizeof(char)*SIZE_OF_STRING); // you will have to free this as well
    strcpy((*values)[i], "Hello");
    
  4. In your main, you should declare char **values; as it is a pointer to an array of char* (character string/array).

  5. In you loop you are incorrectly multiplying indices by sizeof, index is counted in elements not in bytes. Thus, you need:

    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE_OF_VALUES; i++)
    
  6. Don't forget to free the memory at the end.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow thanks a lot for the fast reply and the excellent explanation of the problem. I accepted your answer. Thank you very much! –  Mark Johnson Jan 24 '12 at 13:20

Use a char *** type for your parameter of your set_values function:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define SIZE_OF_VALUES 5

void set_values(char ***values)
{
    *values = malloc(sizeof (char *) * SIZE_OF_VALUES);
    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE_OF_VALUES; i++) {
        (*values)[i] = "Hello";
    }
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char **values;
    set_values(&values);

    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE_OF_VALUES; i++) {
        puts(values[i]);
    }

    return 0;
}

Of course you have to check for malloc return value and free allocated memory before exit of main.

share|improve this answer

Here is the solution.

void set_values(char ***values)
{
    int i;
    char ** val;

    val = *values = (char**)malloc(sizeof(char*)*SIZE_OF_VALUES);
    for (i = 0; i < (sizeof(char)*SIZE_OF_VALUES); i++) 
        val[i] = "Hello";
}

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    char **values;
    int i;
    set_values(&values);

    for (i = 0; i < (sizeof(char)*SIZE_OF_VALUES); i++) 
        puts(values[i]); 

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Just posting the fixed code teaches OP nothing. For me, this is a worthless answer. –  Krizz Jan 24 '12 at 13:02

char * is a one dimensional array of char. but you want your code in set_values sets values to a two dimensional array. In order to make this work, define:

values as char **values;

set_values as void set_values(char ***values)

allocate the pointers for the char arrays as: *values = malloc(sizeof(char*)*SIZE_OF_VALUES);

Besides that your loop is a bit strange:

for (int i = 0; i < (sizeof(char)*SIZE_OF_VALUES); i++) {

should be replaced with

for (int i = 0; i < SIZE_OF_VALUES; i++) {

and finally, if you want to copy a string into your now allocated array use

strncpy((*values)[i], "Hello",  SIZE_OF_STRING-1);
(*values)[i][SIZE_OF_STRING-1] = '\0';

so in total:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>


#define SIZE_OF_VALUES 5
#define SIZE_OF_STRING 100

void set_values(char ***values);

void set_values(char ***values)
{
    const char * content = "Hello";
    *values = malloc(sizeof(char*)*SIZE_OF_VALUES);
    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE_OF_VALUES; i++) {
        (*values)[i] = malloc(sizeof(char)*SIZE_OF_STRING);
        strncpy((*values)[i], content, SIZE_OF_STRING-1);
        (*values)[i][SIZE_OF_STRING-1] = '\0';
        if(strlen(content) >= SIZE_OF_STRING){
            fprintf(stderr,"Warning content string did not fit into buffer!\n");
        }
    }
}

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    char **values;
    set_values(&values);

    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE_OF_VALUES; i++) {
        printf("%s\n", values[i]);
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < SIZE_OF_VALUES; i++) {
       free(values[i]);
    }
    free(values);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

You have an extra * in this line:

*values = malloc(sizeof(char)*SIZE_OF_VALUES);

Which should be:

values = malloc(sizeof(char)*SIZE_OF_VALUES);

Also you have considerable problem in your main, char* values should be char** values, passing your char* values by reference (set_values(&values);) may cause segmentation fault I suspect.

For affecting the outer array, it's already being affected because when passing to the function you are only copying a pointer that points to the same place, so the modifications will affect the same memory blocks.

share|improve this answer
1  
Passing by reference is only supported in C++. As the question is tagged as "C", he would need three level of pointers there. –  Renan Greinert Jan 24 '12 at 12:44

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