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On Windows7, I have a command-line program that fails due to file write permission errors, and popping up annoying UAC dialogs every time I run command-line programs that are from 'unknown publisher'.

However, if I start my console by right clicking and choosing 'run as administrator', then the install works fine, even if the UAC dialogs are still present.

My user is already a member of the 'administrators' group, so what precisely does 'run as administrator' do that makes my install work?

EDIT: My specific question is precisely what does 'run as administrator' do? Neither of the answers thus far address this. (e.g. Does it run the new process as the 'Administrator' user? Or does it run the process as the current user, but with elevated privileges? If so, what privileges? How does that differ from the privileges I get from my user being in the 'Administrators' group?

(specifically, I'm using the 'Console' from sourceforge, not a regular CMD window, but I don't think that's important. This is all while installing the Python 'distribute' package by running 'python distribute_setup.py' on a newly installed Python3 MSI from python.org. It's a 32-bit Python on 64-bit Windows. See Installing Python and Distribute on Windows 7 gives "Writing failed ... permission denied")

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You need to do a websearch on UAC and read up on this rather old technology –  David Heffernan Jan 24 '12 at 12:55
    
I don't understand why you say that David - my question isn't about UAC - it's about 'run as administrator'. I did many web searches while spending most of a day trying to figure this out, but have not yet found the answers. –  Jonathan Hartley Jan 24 '12 at 13:21
    
Your question is definitely about UAC. Run as admin starts the process with an admin token rather than a restricted token. Do the web search and read about the different types of tokens. –  David Heffernan Jan 24 '12 at 13:38
    
Alright, thanks. No wonder my searches didn't work well. :-) –  Jonathan Hartley Jan 24 '12 at 14:19
    
This article explains well: Teach Your Apps To Play Nicely With Windows Vista User Account Control -- msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163486.aspx –  JamieSee Feb 3 '12 at 18:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 43 down vote accepted

When you log on Windows creates an access token. This identifies you, the groups you are a member of and your privileges. And note that whether a user is an administrator or not is determined by whether the user is a member of the Administrators group.

Without UAC, when you run a program it gets a copy of the access token, and this controls what the program can access.

With UAC, when you run a program it gets a restricted access token. The is the original access token with "Administrators" removed from the list of groups (and some other changes). Even though your user is a member of the Administrators group, the program can't use Administrator privileges.

When you select "Run as Administrator" and your user is an administrator the program is launched with the original unrestricted access token. If your user is not an administrator you are prompted for an administrator account, and the program is run under that account.

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1  
+1 Excellent answer, I was about to write something very similar, you saved me the job and you did it better that I would have done! ;-) –  David Heffernan Jan 24 '12 at 14:08
1  
Alright, this makes sense and seems to explain all my symptoms. Thanks for helping me understand. –  Jonathan Hartley Jan 24 '12 at 14:20
    
@DavidHeffernan: Cheers! –  arx Jan 24 '12 at 14:20

So ... more digging, with the result. It seems that although I ran one process normal and one "As Administrator", I had UAC off. Turning UAC to medium allowed me to see different results. Basically, it all boils down to integrity levels, which are 5. Browsers for example run at Low Level (1), while services (System user) run at System Level (4). Everything is very well explained here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb625963.aspx. When UAC is enabled, processes are created with Medium level (SID S-1-16-8192 aka 0x2000 is added) while when "Run as Administrator", process is created with High Level (SID S-1-16-12288 aka 0x3000).

So the correct ACCESS_TOKEN for normal user (Medium Integrity level) is:

0:000:x86> !token
Thread is not impersonating. Using process token...
TS Session ID: 0x1
User: S-1-5-21-1542574918-171588570-488469355-1000
Groups: 
 00 S-1-5-21-1542574918-171588570-488469355-513
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 01 S-1-1-0
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 02 S-1-5-32-544
    Attributes - DenyOnly 
 03 S-1-5-32-545
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 04 S-1-5-4
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 05 S-1-2-1
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 06 S-1-5-11
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 07 S-1-5-15
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 08 S-1-5-5-0-1908477
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled LogonId 
 09 S-1-2-0
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 10 S-1-5-64-10
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 11 S-1-16-8192
    Attributes - GroupIntegrity GroupIntegrityEnabled 
Primary Group:   LocadDumpSid failed to dump Sid at addr 000000000266b458, 0xC0000078; try own SID dump.
s-1-0x515000000
Privs: 
 00 0x000000013 SeShutdownPrivilege               Attributes - 
 01 0x000000017 SeChangeNotifyPrivilege           Attributes - Enabled Default 
 02 0x000000019 SeUndockPrivilege                 Attributes - 
 03 0x000000021 SeIncreaseWorkingSetPrivilege     Attributes - 
 04 0x000000022 SeTimeZonePrivilege               Attributes - 
Auth ID: 0:1d1f65
Impersonation Level: Anonymous
TokenType: Primary
Is restricted token: no.

Now, the differences are as follows:

S-1-5-32-544
Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled Owner 

for "As Admin", while

S-1-5-32-544
Attributes - DenyOnly 

for non-admin. Note that S-1-5-32-544 is BUILTIN\Administrators. Also, there are fewer privileges, and the most important thing to notice:

admin:

S-1-16-12288
Attributes - GroupIntegrity GroupIntegrityEnabled 

while for non-admin:

S-1-16-8192
Attributes - GroupIntegrity GroupIntegrityEnabled 

Hope this helps. Further reading: http://www.blackfishsoftware.com/blog/don/creating_processes_sessions_integrity_levels

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some upvotes, for adding specifics and links to background. –  Jonathan Hartley Mar 20 '13 at 13:16
    
Andrei: Good info, but next time just edit your existing answer to add the additional info rather than creating a new answer. –  Lawrence Dol Apr 25 '13 at 16:38

UPDATE

"Run as Aministrator" is just a command, enabling the program to continue some operations that require the Administrator privileges, without displaying the UAC alerts.

Even if your user is a member of administrators group, some applications like yours need the Administrator privileges to continue running, because the application is considered not safe, if it is doing some special operation, like editing a system file or something else. This is the reason why Windows needs the Administrator privilege to execute the application and it notifies you with a UAC alert. Not all applications need an Amnistrator account to run, and some applications, like yours, need the Administrator privileges.

If you execute the application with 'run as administrator' command, you are notifying the system that your application is safe and doing something that requires the administrator privileges, with your confirm.

If you want to avoid this, just disable the UAC on Control Panel.

If you want to go further, read this question on Microsoft forum or this SuperUser question.

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Hey. Thanks for the answer but I'm still very confused. Are you saying that 'run as administrator' runs the process as a different user? The 'Administrator' user? This is curious to me, because executing cygwin's "whoami" from such a terminal still shows my original username, not "Administrator", and files created from that terminal are owned by me, not by Administrator. Are you also saying that user Administrator has other privileges that members of the 'administrators' group do not? –  Jonathan Hartley Jan 24 '12 at 13:28
    
Disabling UAC is nice to get rid of the annoying dialogs, but it doesn't solve my main problem, that command-line install programs fail due to lack of privs. –  Jonathan Hartley Jan 24 '12 at 13:29
1  
@JonathanHartley Disabling UAC is a bad idea. You want to see those prompts. –  David Heffernan Jan 24 '12 at 14:19
    
@JonathanHartley Sorry, I didn't explained very well. I edited the answer. The command 'run as administrator' is needed only an applications that require administrator privileges, such as writing on a particulary directory, or doing something with system files, etc. This is needed also because not all applications need an Amnistrator account to run. If you execute the application with 'run as administrator' command, you are notifying the system that your application is safe and doing an operation that requires the administrator privileges. –  Alberto Solano Jan 24 '12 at 14:40
    
@DavidHeffernan acknowledged and agreed, I agreed about disabling UAC only in principle to get rid of the dialogs, but wouldn't do it in practice. –  Jonathan Hartley Jan 24 '12 at 21:18

Things like "elevates the privileges", "restricted access token", "Administrator privilege" ... what the heck is administrator privilege anyway? are nonsense.

Here is an ACCESS_TOKEN for a process normally run from a user belonging to Administrators group.

0: kd> !process 0 1 test.exe
PROCESS 87065030  SessionId: 1  Cid: 0d60    Peb: 7ffdf000  ParentCid: 0618
    DirBase: 2f22e1e0  ObjectTable: a0c8a088  HandleCount:   6.
    Image: test.exe
    VadRoot 8720ef50 Vads 18 Clone 0 Private 83. Modified 0. Locked 0.
    DeviceMap 8936e560
    Token                             935c98e0
0: kd> !token -n 935c98e0
_TOKEN 935c98e0
TS Session ID: 0x1
User: S-1-5-21-2452432034-249115698-1235866470-1000 (no name mapped)
User Groups: 
 00 S-1-5-21-2452432034-249115698-1235866470-513 (no name mapped)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 01 S-1-1-0 (Well Known Group: localhost\Everyone)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 02 S-1-5-32-544 (Alias: BUILTIN\Administrators)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled Owner 
 03 S-1-5-32-545 (Alias: BUILTIN\Users)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 04 S-1-5-4 (Well Known Group: NT AUTHORITY\INTERACTIVE)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 05 S-1-2-1 (Well Known Group: localhost\CONSOLE LOGON)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 06 S-1-5-11 (Well Known Group: NT AUTHORITY\Authenticated Users)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 07 S-1-5-15 (Well Known Group: NT AUTHORITY\This Organization)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 08 S-1-5-5-0-85516 (no name mapped)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled LogonId 
 09 S-1-2-0 (Well Known Group: localhost\LOCAL)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 10 S-1-5-64-10 (Well Known Group: NT AUTHORITY\NTLM Authentication)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 11 S-1-16-12288 (Label: Mandatory Label\High Mandatory Level)
    Attributes - GroupIntegrity GroupIntegrityEnabled 
Primary Group: S-1-5-21-2452432034-249115698-1235866470-513 (no name mapped)
Privs: 
 05 0x000000005 SeIncreaseQuotaPrivilege          Attributes - 
 08 0x000000008 SeSecurityPrivilege               Attributes - 
 09 0x000000009 SeTakeOwnershipPrivilege          Attributes - 
 10 0x00000000a SeLoadDriverPrivilege             Attributes - 
 11 0x00000000b SeSystemProfilePrivilege          Attributes - 
 12 0x00000000c SeSystemtimePrivilege             Attributes - 
 13 0x00000000d SeProfileSingleProcessPrivilege   Attributes - 
 14 0x00000000e SeIncreaseBasePriorityPrivilege   Attributes - 
 15 0x00000000f SeCreatePagefilePrivilege         Attributes - 
 17 0x000000011 SeBackupPrivilege                 Attributes - 
 18 0x000000012 SeRestorePrivilege                Attributes - 
 19 0x000000013 SeShutdownPrivilege               Attributes - 
 20 0x000000014 SeDebugPrivilege                  Attributes - 
 22 0x000000016 SeSystemEnvironmentPrivilege      Attributes - 
 23 0x000000017 SeChangeNotifyPrivilege           Attributes - Enabled Default 
 24 0x000000018 SeRemoteShutdownPrivilege         Attributes - 
 25 0x000000019 SeUndockPrivilege                 Attributes - 
 28 0x00000001c SeManageVolumePrivilege           Attributes - 
 29 0x00000001d SeImpersonatePrivilege            Attributes - Enabled Default 
 30 0x00000001e SeCreateGlobalPrivilege           Attributes - Enabled Default 
 33 0x000000021 SeIncreaseWorkingSetPrivilege     Attributes - 
 34 0x000000022 SeTimeZonePrivilege               Attributes - 
 35 0x000000023 SeCreateSymbolicLinkPrivilege     Attributes - 
Authentication ID:         (0,14e4c)
Impersonation Level:       Anonymous
TokenType:                 Primary
Source: User32             TokenFlags: 0x2000 ( Token in use )
Token ID: d166b            ParentToken ID: 0
Modified ID:               (0, d052f)
RestrictedSidCount: 0      RestrictedSids: 00000000
OriginatingLogonSession: 3e7

... and here is an ACCESS_TOKEN for a process normally run by the same user with "Run as administrator".

TS Session ID: 0x1
User: S-1-5-21-2452432034-249115698-1235866470-1000 (no name mapped)
User Groups: 
 00 S-1-5-21-2452432034-249115698-1235866470-513 (no name mapped)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 01 S-1-1-0 (Well Known Group: localhost\Everyone)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 02 S-1-5-32-544 (Alias: BUILTIN\Administrators)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled Owner 
 03 S-1-5-32-545 (Alias: BUILTIN\Users)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 04 S-1-5-4 (Well Known Group: NT AUTHORITY\INTERACTIVE)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 05 S-1-2-1 (Well Known Group: localhost\CONSOLE LOGON)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 06 S-1-5-11 (Well Known Group: NT AUTHORITY\Authenticated Users)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 07 S-1-5-15 (Well Known Group: NT AUTHORITY\This Organization)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 08 S-1-5-5-0-85516 (no name mapped)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled LogonId 
 09 S-1-2-0 (Well Known Group: localhost\LOCAL)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 10 S-1-5-64-10 (Well Known Group: NT AUTHORITY\NTLM Authentication)
    Attributes - Mandatory Default Enabled 
 11 S-1-16-12288 (Label: Mandatory Label\High Mandatory Level)
    Attributes - GroupIntegrity GroupIntegrityEnabled 
Primary Group: S-1-5-21-2452432034-249115698-1235866470-513 (no name mapped)
Privs: 
 05 0x000000005 SeIncreaseQuotaPrivilege          Attributes - 
 08 0x000000008 SeSecurityPrivilege               Attributes - 
 09 0x000000009 SeTakeOwnershipPrivilege          Attributes - 
 10 0x00000000a SeLoadDriverPrivilege             Attributes - 
 11 0x00000000b SeSystemProfilePrivilege          Attributes - 
 12 0x00000000c SeSystemtimePrivilege             Attributes - 
 13 0x00000000d SeProfileSingleProcessPrivilege   Attributes - 
 14 0x00000000e SeIncreaseBasePriorityPrivilege   Attributes - 
 15 0x00000000f SeCreatePagefilePrivilege         Attributes - 
 17 0x000000011 SeBackupPrivilege                 Attributes - 
 18 0x000000012 SeRestorePrivilege                Attributes - 
 19 0x000000013 SeShutdownPrivilege               Attributes - 
 20 0x000000014 SeDebugPrivilege                  Attributes - 
 22 0x000000016 SeSystemEnvironmentPrivilege      Attributes - 
 23 0x000000017 SeChangeNotifyPrivilege           Attributes - Enabled Default 
 24 0x000000018 SeRemoteShutdownPrivilege         Attributes - 
 25 0x000000019 SeUndockPrivilege                 Attributes - 
 28 0x00000001c SeManageVolumePrivilege           Attributes - 
 29 0x00000001d SeImpersonatePrivilege            Attributes - Enabled Default 
 30 0x00000001e SeCreateGlobalPrivilege           Attributes - Enabled Default 
 33 0x000000021 SeIncreaseWorkingSetPrivilege     Attributes - 
 34 0x000000022 SeTimeZonePrivilege               Attributes - 
 35 0x000000023 SeCreateSymbolicLinkPrivilege     Attributes - 
Authentication ID:         (0,14e4c)
Impersonation Level:       Anonymous
TokenType:                 Primary
Source: User32             TokenFlags: 0x2000 ( Token in use )
Token ID: ce282            ParentToken ID: 0
Modified ID:               (0, cddbd)
RestrictedSidCount: 0      RestrictedSids: 00000000
OriginatingLogonSession: 3e7

As you see, the only difference is the token ID:

Token ID: d166b            ParentToken ID: 0
Modified ID:               (0, d052f)

vs

Token ID: ce282            ParentToken ID: 0
Modified ID:               (0, cddbd)

Sorry, I can't add much light into this yet, but I am still digging.

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Concrete specifics are good. Best of luck with your digging. –  Jonathan Hartley Mar 14 '13 at 14:00

Windows 7 requires that you intentionally ask for certain privileges so that a malicious program can't do bad things to you. If the free calculator you downloaded needed to be run as an administrator, you would know something is up. There are OS commands to elevate the privilege of your application (which will request confirmation from the user).

A good description can be found at:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163486.aspx#S4

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Hey. Thanks for the answer, but all of the sentences in it are already well understood. You haven't answered the actual question "what does 'run as admin' do that being a member of the administrators group does not?" –  Jonathan Hartley Jan 24 '12 at 13:24
    
It elevates the privileges (provided your user is allowed). –  vextorspace Jan 24 '12 at 13:36

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