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I got something like this:

public [What Here?] GetAnything()
{
     Hello hello = new Hello();
     Computer computer = new Computer();
     Radio radio = new Radio();

     return radio; or return computer; or return hello //should be possible?!      
}

I have a Method and this method returns me sometimes different Types of Values (classes).

How can I do this anyway and ofcourse later to work with the variables, b.e radio.Play(); and so far?

Do I need to use generics? How?

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1  
See stackoverflow.com/questions/1048884/c-overriding-return-types for a similar problem and a solution. I have to be honest, though, in that I think you have a design issue if you are doing this; if you have defined types then it should be possible to structure your code without this. –  dash Jan 24 '12 at 12:43
    
you can return object and then cast the result, or use a generic method –  balexandre Jan 24 '12 at 12:44
1  
What is the actual problem you're trying to solve? –  RQDQ Jan 24 '12 at 12:47

12 Answers 12

up vote 13 down vote accepted

If there is no common base-type or interface, then public object GetAnything() {...} - but it would usually be preferable to have some kind of abstraction such as a common interface. For example if Hello, Computer and Radio all implemented IFoo, then it could return an IFoo.

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okay thank you! –  eMi Jan 24 '12 at 12:45

Here is how you might do it with generics:

public T GetAnything<T>()
{
   T t = //Code to create instance

   return t;
}

But you would have to know what type you wanted returned at design time. And that would mean that you could just call a different method for each creation...

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If you can make a abstract class for all the possibilities then that is highly recommended:

public Hardware GetAnything()
{
     Computer computer = new Computer();

     return computer;    
}

abstract Hardware {

}

class Computer : Hardware {

}

Or an interface:

interface IHardware {

}

class Computer : IHardware {

}

If it can be anything then you could consider using "object" as your return type, because every class derives from object.

public object GetAnything()
{
     Hello hello = new Hello();

     return helo;    
}
share|improve this answer

Marc's answer should be the correct one, but in .NET 4 you couldn't also go with dynamic type.

This should be used only if you have no control over the classes you return and there are no common ancestors ( usually with interop ) and only if not using dynamic is a lot more painful then using(casting every object in every step :) ).

Few blog post trying to explain when to use dynamic: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/csharpfaq/archive/tags/dynamic/

public dynamic GetSomething()
{
     Hello hello = new Hello();
     Computer computer = new Computer();
     Radio radio = new Radio(); 
     return // anyobject

}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, you can do just fine without the dynamic keyword. Just like my other comment states. This is not a scenario in which you use dynamic. –  Aidiakapi Jan 24 '12 at 12:53
    
@Aidiakapi I know you could do it without dynamic, thats why I added the second line of my answer. Which is a good use of dynamic i think.For example you could have a similar problem using office interop dynamic can save you a lot of keystrokes :) –  ThEvil Jan 24 '12 at 13:02
    
Dynamic has it's uses, but most people see it as a magical keyword, and overuse it. (Like in this example.) It should be avoided wherever possible. –  Aidiakapi Jan 24 '12 at 13:04
    
@Aidiakapi thats true. –  ThEvil Jan 24 '12 at 13:06
    
I'm glad you agree with that. I suspect he could wrap in all in an interface here. –  Aidiakapi Jan 24 '12 at 13:08

You can have the return type to be a superclass of the three classes (either defined by you or just use object). Then you can return any one of those objects, but you will need to cast it back to the correct type when getting the result. Like:

public object GetAnything()
{
     Hello hello = new Hello();
     Computer computer = new Computer();
     Radio radio = new Radio();

     return radio; or return computer; or return hello //should be possible?!      
}

Then:

Hello hello = (Hello)getAnything(); 
share|improve this answer
    
okay thank you! –  eMi Jan 24 '12 at 12:45

You have a few options depending on why you want to return different types.

a) You can just return an object, and the caller can cast it (possibly after type checks) to what they want. This means of course, that you lose a lot of the advantages of static typing.

b) If the types returned all have a 'requirement' in common, you might be able to use generics with constriants.

c) Create a common interface between all of the possible return types and then return the interface.

d) Switch to F# and use pattern matching and discriminated unions. (Sorry, slightly tongue in check there!)

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Lol, or you could go to C++ and use void* >.<, I doubt he wants to use any other programming language than what he asked. –  Aidiakapi Jan 24 '12 at 12:51
    
That's why it's option d. Having said that, I've several projects that have a mixed F#/C# code base; each of the languages has it's own strong points. –  mavnn Jan 24 '12 at 12:55
    
I agree, just like C++/CLI does, which can also be shared in projects. Nevertheless I think it's quite unrelated to the question. (Don't get me wrong, I like F#, it's great for very specific cases.) –  Aidiakapi Jan 24 '12 at 13:00

Let the method return a object from a common baseclass or interface.

public class TV:IMediaPlayer
{
   void Play(){};
}

public class Radio:IMediaPlayer
{
   void Play(){};
}

public interface IMediaPlayer
{
   void Play():
}

public class Test
{
  public void Main()
  {
     IMediaPlayer player = GetMediaPlayer();
     player.Play();
  }


  private IMediaPlayer GetMediaPlayer()
  {
     if(...)
        return new TV();
     else
        return new Radio();
  }
}
share|improve this answer

You could just return an Object as all types are descended from Object.

public Object GetAnything()
{
     Hello hello = new Hello();
     Computer computer = new Computer();
     Radio radio = new Radio();

     return radio; or return computer; or return hello //should be possible?!      
}

You could then cast to its relevant type:

Hello hello = (Hello)GetAnything();

If you didn't know what the type was going to be then you could use the is keyword.

Object obj = GetAnything();
if (obj is Hello) {
    // Do something
}

This being said I would be reluctant to write code like that. It would be much better to have an interface which is implemented by each of your classes.

public ISpeak GetAnything()
{
     Hello hello = new Hello();
     Computer computer = new Computer();
     Radio radio = new Radio();

     return radio; or return computer; or return hello //should be possible?!      
}

interface ISpeak 
{
   void Speak();
}

and have each of your classes implement the interface:

public class Hello : ISpeak
{
    void Speak() {
        Console.WriteLine("Hello");
    }
}

You could then do something like:

GetAnything().Speak();
share|improve this answer

Rick's solution is the 'best' way to go in most cases. Sometimes when that's not available you want to use object as base type. And you could use the method like this:

public object GetAnything()
{
     Hello hello = new Hello();
     Computer computer = new Computer();
     Radio radio = new Radio();

     return hello; // or computer or radio   
}

To use it, you will want to use the as operator, like this:

public void TestMethod()
{
    object anything = GetAnything();
    var hello = anything as Hello;
    var computer = anything as Computer;
    var radio = anything as Radio;

    if (hello != null)
    {
        // GetAnything() returned a hello
    }
    else if (computer != null)
    {
        // GetAnything() returned a computer
    }
    else if (radio != null)
    {
        // GetAnything() returned a radio
    }
    else
    {
        // GetAnything() returned... well anything :D
    }
}

In your case you want to call a method play. So this'd seem more appropriate:

interface IPlayable
{
    void Play();
}

class Radio : IPlayable
{
    public void Play() { /* Play radio */ }
}

class Hello : IPlayable
{
    public void Play() { /* Say hello */ }
}

class Computer : IPlayable
{
    public void Play() { /* beep beep */ }
}

public IPlayable GetAnything()
{
     Hello hello = new Hello();
     Computer computer = new Computer();
     Radio radio = new Radio();

     return hello; // or computer or radio   
}
share|improve this answer

You could use external class, set the properties types as you wish, then use it in your function.

public class MultipleOpjects
{
    private List<string> _ObjectOne;
    public List<string> ObjectOne {
        get { return _ObjectOne; }
        set { _ObjectOne = value; }
    }
    private List<object> _ObjectTwo;
    public List<object> ObjectTwo {
        get { return _ObjectTwo; }
        set { _ObjectTwo = value; }
    }
    private object _ObjectThree;
    public object ObjectThree {
        get { return _ObjectThree; }
        set { _ObjectThree = value; }
    }
}
public MultipleOpjects GetAnything()
{
    MultipleOpjects Vrble = new MultipleOpjects();
    Vrble.ObjectOne  = SomeThing1;
    Vrble.ObjectTwo = SomeThing2;
    Vrble.ObjectThree = SomeThing3;

    return Vrble;      
}
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To build on the answer by @RQDQ using generics, you can combine this with Func<TResult> (or some variation) and delegate responsibility to the caller:

public T GetAnything<T>(Func<T> createInstanceOfT)
{
    //do whatever

    return createInstanceOfT();
}

Then you can do something like:

Computer comp = GetAnything(() => new Computer());
Radio rad = GetAnything(() => new Radio());
share|improve this answer

May be you need "dynamic" type?

public dynamic GetAnything()
{
     Hello hello = new Hello();
     Computer computer = new Computer();
     Radio radio = new Radio();

     return /*what boject you needed*/ ;`enter code here`   
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is not what dynamic is a correct usage for. Dynamic is just a fancy wrapper around reflection, and is used for truly dynamic objects. Not for simple object oriented scenarios. –  Aidiakapi Jan 24 '12 at 12:49

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