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I have the next code:

public static T GetSerializedCopy<T> (T src)
{
  //some code to obtain a copy
}

How I can guarantee that T will be a class, not a struct or enum or simething else?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's pretty easy to ensure that...

    public static T GetSerializedCopy<T>(T src) where T : class
    {
        //some code to obtain a copy
        return default(T);
    }
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4  
Actually, that doesn't ensure that T is a class; it ensures that it is a reference – Marc Gravell Jan 24 '12 at 13:13
    
Damn you! you wise nerd :D – cyberzed Jan 24 '12 at 13:22
    
Not related to the OP's question, but default(T) doesn't give you a copy of T, it gives you a blank new T. – VVS Jan 24 '12 at 13:22
1  
@VVS no it doesn't - it gives null - but I'm pretty sure cyberzed intends that to be read as "TODO : your code here" – Marc Gravell Jan 24 '12 at 13:27
2  
This is the oddest selection for the correct answer. The code is incorrect (well, the signature is but that return default(T) should be removed), it doesn't include any references, wasn't the first answer nor is it the best... Now I'm never going to overtake Jon Skeet. – Will Jan 24 '12 at 14:30

It is a common mistake (see the answers here) to think that adding where T : class to the generic method/type declaration achieves this - but this is wrong. This actually means "T must be a reference type", which includes delegates and interfaces too (plus arrays, and things like string).

If you want a class, there are two ways; the easiest is to insist on where T : class, new(), since neither an interface nor a delegate can have constructors. This does have false negatives, though, in terms of rejecting classes without public parameterless constructors.

The only other way is at runtime:

if(!typeof(T).IsClass) throw new InvalidOperationException("T must be a class");

Equally, where T : struct doesn't mean "T must be a value-type", either! It means "Tmust be a non-nullable value-type"; types involving Nullable<> do not satisfy T : struct, despite the fact that Nullable<Foo> is a struct.

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You should refactor your comments here :-) – VVS Jan 24 '12 at 13:19
    
You just had to snatch my low hanging fruit from my greedy fingers and smash it, didn't you? – Will Jan 24 '12 at 13:23
    
clarification: the .IsClass check would typically be used in addition to a where T : class constraint - the latter deals with the majority of obvious failings. You could make this check as granular as needed. – Marc Gravell Jan 24 '12 at 13:25
    
They could though be making the other common mistake, of thinking they need to ensure T is a class when what they really need to do is ensure it's a reference type. There are plenty of cases where you can't do something with a value-type, but you can with a delegate, interface, or boxed value-type. – Jon Hanna Jan 24 '12 at 13:53
1  
@Jon agreed; it all comes down to exactly what the OP means in their question - but it is valuable having answers here to both meanings, since the next person who finds the question may have a different intent – Marc Gravell Jan 24 '12 at 13:58
public static T GetSerializedCopy<T> (T src) where T : class

This is the link to MSDN for generic type constraints.

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1  
Actually, that doesn't ensure that T is a class; it ensures that it is a reference – Marc Gravell Jan 24 '12 at 13:12
    
@MarcGravell do you really think thats what the question is asking? – 32bitkid Jan 24 '12 at 13:14
    
@MarcGravell: any class, interface, delegate, or array type, yes. But that is as atomic as it gets. You'll have to perform asserts if this doesn't cut it. – Will Jan 24 '12 at 13:16
1  
@32bitkid: Depends on how exact OP was being when he said "class" and "something else". – Will Jan 24 '12 at 13:16
    
@Will i get it, I'm a fan of specificity. but based on the question (its comparison to "not a struct or enum or simething") and the fact that the first google hit for the literal title of this question (appending "c#") returns the msdn documentation of type constraints, i'm still gonna go with a +1 on this answer. – 32bitkid Jan 24 '12 at 13:20

you can use Type Constraints, on your interfaces. Type constraint

where T : class
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Actually, that doesn't ensure that T is a class; it ensures that it is a reference – Marc Gravell Jan 24 '12 at 13:13

use this:

where T: class

Yes..

public static T GetSerializedCopy<T> (T src)
   where T : class
{
  //some code to obtain a copy
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, that doesn't ensure that T is a class; it ensures that it is a reference – Marc Gravell Jan 24 '12 at 13:13
    
Yes Marc, but that is the intention of OP here. – Aliostad Jan 24 '12 at 13:57
    
that depends on how we interpret "guarantee that T will be a class, not a struct or enum or simething else" - an interface is not a class; a delegate is borderline; either would satisfy T : class – Marc Gravell Jan 24 '12 at 14:06

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