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I am converting a large VC++ 6.0 application to VS2010 and keep running into this error for one of the projects:

error C2248: 'std::basic_ios<_Elem,_Traits>::basic_ios' : cannot access private member declared in class 'std::basic_ios<_Elem,_Traits>' 
1>          with  
1>          [  
1>              _Elem=char,  
1>              _Traits=std::char_traits<char>  
1>          ]  
1>          c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\ios(176) : see declaration of 'std::basic_ios<_Elem,_Traits>::basic_ios'  
1>          with  
1>          [  
1>              _Elem=char,  
1>              _Traits=std::char_traits<char>  
1>          ]  
1>          This diagnostic occurred in the compiler generated function 'std::basic_ofstream<_Elem,_Traits>::basic_ofstream(const std::basic_ofstream<_Elem,_Traits> &)'  
1>          with  
1>          [  
1>              _Elem=char,  
1>              _Traits=std::char_traits<char>  
1>          ]  

Based on the error text and similar questions asked here, I assume that the error is caused by an instance of ofstream passed directly into a functions, instead of being passed by reference.

The problem I have is, to locate the line of code in which the ofstream is passed in the wrong way. The error message only links to the fstream header included in VS2010 and my project uses ofstream all over the place in a code base of several tens of thousand lines of code (none of which written by me).

I would greatly appriciate any help / tips / strategies to locate this type of compiler error. How would you approach the problem of locating this kind of error?

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2  
Are there not more diagnostics underneath that error, that point out the invoking line? That's usually the case. If not, I'd be (a) very surprised, and (b) hopelessly screwed. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 24 '12 at 13:19
1  
(Well done on determining that the fault is caused by an attempt to copy a stream object, though. :D) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 24 '12 at 13:20
    
The name of the source file that the compiler is processing is printed and will be prior to any error messages caused by that source file. Does this not narrow down the offenders for you? –  hmjd Jan 24 '12 at 13:23
    
Use a different compiler. AFAIK, it is a problem with VC++ that it simply doesn't say where the compiler-generated copy constructor that stumbles upon a private copy constructor is used (also rendering things like boost::non_copyable useless). –  visitor Jan 24 '12 at 13:32
    
I would use a very simple approach: search for ever instance of ofstream and replace it by ostream&! You can do a global search and replace and fix up the few places where you are actually creating an ofstream. All others shall not need to know that's an ofstream or you problems are a lot bigger anyway. –  Dietmar Kühl Jan 24 '12 at 13:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How would you approach the problem of locating this kind of error?

Do a grep (regex search) in your source files for something like

\(([^,]+,)*, (std::)?of?stream [^&]
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Better yet: sed - s/ofstream/ostream&/g and fix the places it is really necessary to know it is an 'ofstream'. Shame it's a problem on Windows... –  Dietmar Kühl Jan 24 '12 at 13:42
    
Accepted, as a search for ofstream finally did the trick. –  lowglider Jan 24 '12 at 15:18

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