Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a problem. I spend around 5 hours trying everything, but I was not even able to reproduce it properly so I include the simplified original source code. I apologize for the extent, but I wanted to include all the relevant information I found out so far. This is one of the few times I feel completely powerless and kindly request your help. Any ideas are welcome. Also any comments that can bring at least some light to the matter. The behaviour in this case is a complete mystery to me.

I am programming in QtCreator in Ubuntu. I am trying to develop a framework to solve mathematical problems using a Population of candidate solutions, which should evolve into the true solution.

There are 3 classes involved: Population, PopulationMember and Problem:

class PopulationMember
{
    QVector<Number> x_;
    QVector<Number> y_;
    Population* population_;   EDIT: Sorry, this is a pointer
    void evaluate();
    friend class Population;
};

class Population
{p
public:
    QList<PopulationMember*>       members_; // created on the heap
    Problem* problem_;                       // created on the heap
    const Problem* readProblem() const;p
    void evaluate();
    void report() const; 
 ...
};

class Problem
{
public:
    void evaluate(PopulationMember&)const;
};

Usually my program runs in loops, where the population calls its various methods. One of them is Population::evaluate(). My program ran great until I introduced some new methods of Population.

for (int i = 1; i != 101; ++i)
{
    Population->evaluate();
    Population->someMethod1();
    Population temp = Population->clone();
    temp->someMethod2();
    Population->append(temp);
    Population->someNewMethod();
    Population->someSorting();
    if (i % 10 == 0)
        Population->report();
}

Then I get a segmentation error in the middle of program. The strangest thing is that it happens only after the 10 loops, after the population executed report(). Also after some experimentation, when I excluded all the operations which require dynamic allocation of some sort (strings) from the report() method, I do not get the error. Conversely when I disable the sorting method (uses either std::sort or qSort) the problem stops. Also when I leave the actions done by the temp Population, there is no problem. So I started to debug the program. I let it complete 10 loops and started to debug step by step. I went into Population->evaluate();

void Population::evaluate()
{   
    for (Iterator it = begin(); it != end(); ++it)
    {
        std::cout << problem_;   // debug see bellow:
    (*it) -> evaluate();     // If I change to problem_->evaluate(**it); the program works.
}

}

debug: The addres printed out is 0xbffff628. This is same as the previous 10 * population_->members_.count() printouts.

I go inside the (*it) -> evaluate(); Here I switch to assembly code:

  864           (*it) -> evaluate();
0x805380c  <+122>:  lea    -0x10(%ebp),%eax
0x805380f  <+125>:  mov    %eax,(%esp)
0x8053812  <+128>:  call   0x8055d84 <QList<PopulationMember*>::iterator::operator*() const>
0x8053817  <+133>:  mov    (%eax),%eax
0x8053819  <+135>:  mov    %eax,(%esp)
0x805381c  <+138>:  call   0x805ae08 <PopulationMember::evaluate()>

I go inside the call of function at the last instruction. At the instant I do this, all the attributes in problem_ become not accessible according to my debugger. At this point all is lost.

void PopulationMember::evaluate()
{
    population_ -> readProblem() -> evaluate(*this);
}

    135 {
0x805ae08  <+000>:  push   %ebp
0x805ae09  <+001>:  mov    %esp,%ebp
0x805ae0b  <+003>:  sub    $0x18,%esp
        136     population_ -> readProblem() -> evaluate(*this);
0x805ae0e  <+006>:  mov    0x8(%ebp),%eax
0x805ae11  <+009>:  mov    0x4(%eax),%eax
0x805ae14  <+012>:  mov    %eax,(%esp)
0x805ae17  <+015>:  call   0x8051bc4 <Population::readProblem() const>
0x805ae1c  <+020>:  mov    0x8(%ebp),%edx
0x805ae1f  <+023>:  mov    %edx,0x4(%esp)
0x805ae23  <+027>:  mov    %eax,(%esp)
0x805ae26  <+030>:  call   0x804e962 <Problem::evaluate(PopulationMember&) const>
        137 }
0x805ae2b  <+035>:  leave
0x805ae2c  <+036>:  ret
0x805ae2d   nop

const Problem* Population::readProblem() const
{
    std::cout << problem_ << std::endl; // debug see bellow: 
    return problem_;
}

debug: Finally the address the problem_ is pointing at becomes 0xbffff780 instead of 0xbffff628. An increment of 344

This happens always. The increment is 344. If I make some minor changes in the program, the address changes, but the difference between these two addresses remains 344. This is all the more puzzling, since the size of all my three classes is less than 100.

The program crashes inside the void Problem::evaluate(PopulationMember&)const; method as soon as some logic is involved.

EDIT:

Population Population::clone()
{
    Population temp(*this);
    return temp;
}

Population::Population(const Population& population)
{
    this->setProblem(population.problem_);

    Population::ConstIterator cit;
    for (cit = population.constBegin(); cit != population.constEnd(); ++cit)
        this->addCopy(*cit);

    this->ownsMembers_ = true;
}

void Population::addCopy (PopulationMember* populationMember)
{
    PopulationMember *temp = new PopulationMember(*populationMember); // Memberwise
    temp -> population_ = this;
    members_.push_back(populationMember);
}

Population::~Population()
{
    if (ownsMembers_)
        foreach (PopulationMember* X, members_)
            delete X;
}

void Population::append(Population& population)
{
    if (population.ownsMembers_)
    {
        members_.append(population.members_);
        population.ownsMembers_ = false;
    }
    else
        members_.append(population.members_);
 }
share|improve this question
2  
Is there any way you can simplify the problem? Can you show us the Clone() method? –  Luchian Grigore Jan 24 '12 at 14:21
    
Have you tried valgrind? –  Vaughn Cato Jan 24 '12 at 14:23
    
Population Population::clone () const { Population temp(*this); return temp; } –  Martin Drozdik Jan 24 '12 at 14:24
    
The first thing that catched my eye was that each PopulationMember holds an entire Population. So when you have 1 Population with 10 Members, each of these members has its own population object, resulting in 10 populations! This could also produce some unexpected behaviour, esp. with stack-allocated members / destructors / ... –  king_nak Jan 24 '12 at 14:25
    
What about copy constructor implementation? –  Luchian Grigore Jan 24 '12 at 14:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
 Population Population::clone()
 {
   Population temp(*this);
   return temp;
 }

You are copying around Population-instances quite a bit: 1. you are returning a local copy by value, 2. copying again by assigning into another local with

Population temp = Population->clone();

All these instances get pointers to PopulationMember and ownsMembers_ is always set true - this looks quite a bit fishy and you might want to debug with breakpoints in your destructors/constructors to find out the lifecycle of each population and its members.

EDIT: append method

void Population::append(Population& population)
{
    if (population.ownsMembers_)
    {
        members_.append(population.members_);
        population.ownsMembers_ = false;
    }
    ...

This means that the members to not point to the correct Population anymore! The value of Population& is stored on stack and gets deleted after the for loop ends, but the PopulationMembers still point to these Populations.

Edit: Fix

please try this:

void Population::append(Population& population)
{
    if (population.ownsMembers_)
    {
        for (cit = population.constBegin(); cit != population.constEnd(); ++cit)
            (*cit)-> population_ = this;

        population.ownsMembers_ = false;
    }

    members_.append(population.members_);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this was also bugging me, but all the PopulationMembers in the temp are created on the heap. When the temp object goes out of scope, it does not delete its PopulationMembers –  Martin Drozdik Jan 24 '12 at 14:50
    
What is mind boggling for me is that the pointer problem_ just changed. It should not happen. That is why it is killing me –  Martin Drozdik Jan 24 '12 at 14:52
    
If the offset changes as you described, chances are that the this is not valid anymore. Please try to refactor Problem* problem_; to const Problem& problem_ - this means changing some constructors as well, but this way you can be sure it does not get deleted. If the problem lives on (as expected), there might be a PopulationMember pointing to a deleted Population - you should be able to refactor Population* population_ to const Population& population_ as well to make sure you're not accidentally deleting a Population where still Members are to be called. Just guessing a bit ;) –  Coder02 Jan 24 '12 at 15:01
    
Thank you Coder02 ! I added for (Iterator it = population.begin(); it != population.end(); ++it) (*it) -> population_ = this; to the beginning of the append method and it works!! That explains everything! If I consider how many times I looked at it and did not see it, I just want to cry. But it is finally over. I am just curious why the problem didnt happen earlier, with other algorithms. But I guess I was just lucky. –  Martin Drozdik Jan 24 '12 at 15:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.