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I've written a code to traverse a knight to all the squares on a chess board only once. The problem with this(below) code is, its working till 7x7 and doing nothing after 8x8. The code is Here chessBoardSize defines the size(8=> 8x8)

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#define chessBoardSize 12

int chessBoard[chessBoardSize][chessBoardSize] = {0};
typedef struct point{
    int x, y;
}POINT;
int count=0;

int nextPosition(int x, int y, POINT* array){
    int m=0;
    /* finds the next possible points for the current
    position in the chess board:
    like
    _   _   _   _   _   _
    _   *   _   *   _   _
    *   _   _   _   *   _
    _   _   P   _   _   _
    *   _   _   _   *   _
    _   *   _   *   _   _  

as above if 'P' is the current (x,y)
* represents the next possible points and 
also checks it exists within the chess board
    */

    if( (x+2) < chessBoardSize ){
        if( (y+1) < chessBoardSize ){
            array[m].x = x+2;
            array[m++].y = y+1;
        }
        if( (y-1) >-1 ){
            array[m].x = x+2;
             array[m++].y = y-1;
        }
    }

    if( (x-2) > -1){
        if( (y+1) < chessBoardSize ){
            array[m].x = x-2;
            array[m++].y = y+1;
        }
        if( (y-1) >-1 ){
            array[m].x = x-2;
            array[m++].y = y-1;
        }
    }

    if( (y+2) < chessBoardSize){
        if( (x+1) < chessBoardSize ){
            array[m].x = x+1; 
            array[m++].y = y+2;
        }
        if( (x-1) >-1 ){
            array[m].x = x-1;
            array[m++].y = y+2;     
        }
    }   

    if( (y-2) > -1){
        if( (x+1) < chessBoardSize ){
            array[m].x = x+1;
            array[m++].y = y-2;
        }
        if( (x-1) >-1 ){
            array[m].x = x-1;
            array[m++].y = y-2;     
        }
    }
    return m;
}

void displayAnswer(){
    int i, j, k;
    printf("\n");
    for(i=0; i<chessBoardSize; i++){
        for(j=0; j<chessBoardSize; j++)
            printf("%d\t",chessBoard[i][j]);
            printf("\n\n");
    }
}

//  recursive function using backtrack method
void knightTravel(int x, int y){
    POINT array[8] = {{0, 0}, {0, 0}};
    // remainin initialized to zero automatically
    volatile int noOfPossiblePoints = nextPosition(x, y, array);
    volatile int i;

    chessBoard[x][y] = ++count;

    // base condition uses count 
    if( count == chessBoardSize * chessBoardSize ){
        displayAnswer();
        exit(0);
    }

    for(i=0; i< noOfPossiblePoints; i++)
        if( chessBoard[array[i].x][array[i].y] == 0 )
            knightTravel(array[i].x, array[i].y); 

    chessBoard[x][y] = 0;
    count--;
}

int main()
{
    knightTravel(0, 0);
    printf("No solution exists\n");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
style note: it can be confusing to have the normal, "success" case terminate via an exit() somewhere down the stack; consider rewriting so that in the normal case, main() is allowed to return. –  gcbenison Jan 30 '12 at 13:31
    
Ya, I thought of that. But couldn't come to main after the function 'displayAnswer()' without using long jumps. So, pls if you've an idea,can you let me know..??? –  Varun Shastry Feb 1 '12 at 3:04
    
Yes it's unfortunate that C doesn't provide a more convenient way to do this. In this case, you could give knightTravel() a return value indicating success or failure, and break out of your for loop on success. –  gcbenison Feb 1 '12 at 5:02

1 Answer 1

The problem is that the approach you are using cannot solve 8x8 or above in any sensible amount of time. Your code is fine but there are 4e51 possible moves, so your program will take a fantastic amount of time to find a tour.

In your program the numbers of iterations are as follows:

5x5 = 74,301

6x6 = 2,511,583

7x7 = 136,328

For 8x8 your program would need to do up to:

3,926,356,053,343,005,839,641,342,729,308,535,057,127,083,875,101,072 iterations.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, Thanks. How did you come up with that(exact) number and any suggestions for better approach??? –  Varun Shastry Jan 24 '12 at 18:30
    
That number is the number of possible moves that a knight can make on a 8x8 board. That I why I say it is 'up to' that number, it is highly likely that your program will find the solution in fewer iterations. –  Carey Hickling Jan 25 '12 at 9:36
    
- because you are not finding all of the tours but just the first one which is 64 moves. You have two options to speed this up, either you need lots of cores and then separate each recursion into a discrete job to be done on another core - this approach may even need lots of machines networked... Or use a non brute force approach, see this link –  Carey Hickling Jan 25 '12 at 9:45
    
Thanks a lot Cary Hickling.... –  Varun Shastry Jan 29 '12 at 13:03

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