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[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlRootAttribute("player", IsNullable = false)]
 public class Player
 {
  ...
  }

Creating and serializing new Player() whitout setting any properties gives me the XML Element<player/> but I would like to get <player></player>.

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3  
can you explain what you want a bit better? –  Rikon Jan 24 '12 at 14:30
    
what would you like to get? –  jsobo Jan 24 '12 at 14:32
    
<player/> is a short form for <player></player>. The XML serialization of your class is valid. –  DaveRead Jan 24 '12 at 14:34

3 Answers 3

As far as XML is concerned, <player/> is equivalent to <player></player>. See XML spec here related to this.

If you still need to have <player></player> then you are doing something wrong.

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sometimes it isn't you ... it is your consumers and well... the customer is always correct. –  jsobo Jan 24 '12 at 16:16
    
They are not! Customer is not right when they ignore the industry standards. Tell them use an XML parser. That is what I do in company I work for. Show them XML spec and tell them they are WRONG!!! –  Aliostad Jan 24 '12 at 16:34
    
You cannot do this in XML, using XML serialiser since as far as XML is concerned, they are the same thing. –  Aliostad Jan 24 '12 at 16:36

I am assuming your problem is when you read an empty node you are crashing. You should always check for empty elements before trying to read any elements/attributes.

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They should be considered equivalent values. However, if you need then working with a custom XmlWriter may be your best bet, as described here in the answer to a similar question here:

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/xmlandnetfx/thread/979315cf-6727-4979-a554-316218ab8b24/

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