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Well, I have a configuration object that contains the settings for various kinds of objects. My classes are generated at runtime as soon as i want to intantiate a new object of a class that hasn't been created so, they rely on the config object to know what attributes are mandatory and some other info: think of it kinda like this:

Config
   ->Class1
      ->Attributes
           ->id
              ->Mandatory: true
           ->imagesource
              ->Mandatory: true
           .................
   ->Class2
     ..........................   

i have a method, validateObject() that checks if the mandatory values are all set for the object, like:

function validateObject($object){
   $config = configObject[get_class($object)];
   foreach($config->attributes as $attrName => $attrVal){
      if($attrVal->mandatory == true){
         if(!isset($object->$attrName){
            throw Error();
         }
      }
   }
}

So far, so good. It happens that now, my config object will have the attribute names turned into camelCase. I decided to let the programmer use any casing they wish so, in the end, i just want to check if the object has any property that, turned to lowercase, will match the one on the Config turned to lowercase to.

My current solution would be something like

function validateObject($object){
   $config = configObject[get_class($object)];
   foreach($config->attributes as $attrName => $attrVal){
      if($attrVal->mandatory == true){
         $lowercaseAttr = str_to_lower($attrName);
         foreach($object as $key => $value){
           if(str_to_lower($key) == $lowercaseAttr){
              //don't throw, move to the next attribute in config
           }
         }
      }
   }
}

This would do the job, although it would need a bit more work. I was looking for a more elegant solution...

I hope i'm not being to confusing, thanks for your help

share|improve this question
    
..strtolower()? –  Damien Pirsy Jan 24 '12 at 15:14
    
Maybe you should convert all atributes to the one case(perhaps lowercase). –  Oyeme Jan 24 '12 at 15:23
    
i don't want to do that, because the programmer would lose track of it. :) –  André Alçada Padez Jan 24 '12 at 15:25
    
Do you want something like areEqual('camelCase', 'camel_case')? –  Álvaro G. Vicario Jan 24 '12 at 15:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The only way I could think of doing this is to add a function to your class similar to

  public function check($p){
    $props =get_object_vars($this);
    $array_to_search;
    foreach($props as $key=>$prop){
        $array_to_search[strtolower($key)] = strtolower($key);
    }
    echo "prop :".array_key_exists(strtolower($p),$array_to_search);
}

and then call

  $obj->check("thingtwo");

The array bit could probably be optimized, I just put this together quickly to see if it would work for you. If you had a number of classes then this function could sit separate and you could pass in an object

  function check($obj,$p){
    $props =get_object_vars($obj);
    $array_to_search;
    foreach($props as $key=>$prop){
        $array_to_search[strtolower($key)] = strtolower($key);
    }
    echo "prop :".array_key_exists(strtolower($p),$array_to_search);
}

    check($myobj, "propertyname");

The above will return true if the property exists but is null. You can check the value by changing the function to

 function check($obj,$p){
    $props =get_object_vars($obj);
    $array_to_search;
    foreach($props as $key=>$prop){
        $array_to_search[strtolower($key)] = $prop;
    }
    echo "prop :".isset($array_to_search[strtolower($p)]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
$array_to_search; what does this construction do ? –  meze Jan 24 '12 at 15:56
1  
it's just an array that gets populated by all the properties. Prob could explictly cast it as an array $array_to_search = new Array(); But as I say I only had time to quickly put this together and test –  TommyBs Jan 24 '12 at 15:58
    
the construction $array_to_search; actually does nothing and pointless. You should always explicitly say it's an array $array_to_search = array(); –  meze Jan 24 '12 at 17:18
    
thank you, i went with something very similar to this –  André Alçada Padez Jan 24 '12 at 17:21
1  
meze, I did point out I very quickly knocked this together and I even stated the array stuff could be optimized. I then furthered expanded that in my reply to your comment.I was heading out the door at the time but thought I would try and help the original poster –  TommyBs Jan 24 '12 at 18:22

Array keys in PHP are case-sensitive, as you know, so what happens when a developer makes a mistake, such as duplicating an existing setting?

Some custom config:

$attributes = array(
    'settingOne' => array(/* stuff */),
    // ...
    'settingone' => array(/* different stuff */)
);

Now, when the developer goes to try and edit the setting, he might edit settingOne, or he might edit settingone. If he happens to not edit the one that your code is reading (which is probably always the first one in the array), then his changes won't work and he has a very hard to find bug on his hands.

It's your design, but if I were doing something in this way, I would require that config array keys match exactly what I expect them to be. This can be clearly emphasized in whatever documentation you create, and solves all problems, as you can then simply use isset(). Most developers are used to this method, I think, as this is how most existing APIs work.

share|improve this answer
    
this makes a lot of sense. My problem comes from another source, though. All my documentation, all the people using this are using with all lowercase. If i change it as you say, everyone will have to change everything. The way i'm trying to do this, it comes with that quirk, but it's the programmer's responsibility to stick to the first choice. –  André Alçada Padez Jan 24 '12 at 16:03
    
If they are all using lowercase right now and you don't want them to have to change, why don't you change your expected key case to be lowercase, as well? Then you can still use isset(). –  drrcknlsn Jan 24 '12 at 17:03
    
this is a "joint venture" of various language APIs, we have .Net, Java, PHP, Javascript, and have to be consistent. Guess who's the underdog who has to comply? :) –  André Alçada Padez Jan 24 '12 at 17:09
1  
If that's the case, then the way you're doing it is really the only way it can be done. –  drrcknlsn Jan 24 '12 at 17:23

You will need to use reflection at that point and compare the found properties of the reflection against an strtolower but still use the case sensitive version to call the property via isset or any other method you wish to use.

http://www.php.net/manual/en/reflectionclass.getproperties.php

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