Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been trying to send packets to a tap interface using python. I'm monitoring the tap interface using wireshark and no packets are being received. I'm doing this as an exercise mainly to help my understanding of vpns, ethernet bridging and socket programming in python.

My System Setup is as follows:

Ubuntu Desktop 11.10
Python 2.7
eth0 ip: 192.168.1.6
tap0 ip: 10.0.0.1

I first setup the tap as follows:

sudo openvpn --mktun --dev tap0
sudo ifconfig tap0 10.0.0.1 netmask 255.255.255.0 broadcast 10.0.0.255 promisc up

This starts the tap0 interface and creates a kernel routing rule to 10.0.0.1/24 via tap0.

Here is the route table:

$ route
Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
10.0.0.0        *               255.255.255.0   U     0      0        0 tap0
192.168.1.6     *               255.255.255.0   U     1      0        0 eth0
default         192.168.1.1     0.0.0.0         UG    0      0        0 eth0

Next I start python interactive and create a simple UDP socket.

import socket
s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET,socket.SOCK_DGRAM)
s.sendto('helloworld',('10.0.0.2',12345))

I run the sendto command with Wireshark monitoring on tap0. Now, there is no host at 10.0.0.2 on my network, but I should at least see some outgoing traffic on the tap0 interface. I have replicated this in windows and it seems to work ok.

I can only think that the problem lies somewhere in the setup of the tap0 interface under linux. That or my mediocre understand of this stuff.

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Have you checked your routing table? What is the output of the command ip route? –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 24 '12 at 15:38
    
i've added the route table. As you can see, traffic on 10.0.0.1/24 should go out over the tap0 interface. –  Pete Jan 24 '12 at 22:36
    
As this actually is not python related, but networking, it should probably be on superuser instead of SO. –  Anony-Mousse Jan 24 '12 at 23:05
    
ok thanks, i'll try there. –  Pete Jan 24 '12 at 23:13
    
ok i've posted to superuser. Should this post be marked as answered or closed or something? –  Pete Jan 24 '12 at 23:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

On an ethertap interface, you probably will actually not see outgoing traffic, if the ARP cache still has the negative (incomplete) entry. Otherwise, you probably seen an ARP packet only.

I don't think this is related to python, actually.

Did you try a ping - do you see an icmp packet go out? What does the arp table look like?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the ARP packets are exactly what I expected to see. I have just tried this exact same experiment at work on a Fedora15 box. It works. ARP packets are sent on the interface. Any idea if this could be a ubuntu or later linux kernel issue? –  Pete Jan 24 '12 at 22:45
    
Well, what is in your ARP table? You don't want to send unnecessary ARP requests, if you still have some cached. –  Anony-Mousse Jan 24 '12 at 22:47
    
arp -i tap0 returns Address: 10.0.0.2 HWaddress:(incomplete) Iface:tap0 I tried a ping, there was only an ARP broadcast, no IP packets. –  Pete Jan 24 '12 at 22:55
    
So it must have sent an ARP request some time ago. Probably before you started wiretap. Yes, ping will also not send ICMP packets, if there was no ARP reply. Because there is no one to send it to. –  Anony-Mousse Jan 24 '12 at 22:57
    
I am monitoring tap0 in real time with wireshark. The moment I ping 10.0.0.2 an ARP broadcast is sent on the tap0 interface. Is this what you mean? –  Pete Jan 24 '12 at 23:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.