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I have this loop which splits a Boolean LinkedList by 8 bits and return the ASCII value of each byte in a buffer. The function return the string buffer.

This code is extremely slow if the LinkedList's size is big. I try to change the Iterator with a simple looping, but it's still slow.

How can this algorithm be really fast ? Maybe with multi-threading ?

Note: The size of the linkedList is not always divisible by 8.

public String toString(){

        String buffer = "";
        String output = "";

        LinkedList<Boolean> bits = this.bits;

        for(Iterator it = this.bits.iterator(); it.hasNext();){
            if(buffer.length() >= 8){
                output += (char)Integer.parseInt(buffer, 2);
                buffer = "";
            }

            buffer += ((Boolean)it.next() == false) ? "0" : "1";
        }

        if(buffer != "")
            output += (char)Integer.parseInt(buffer, 2);

        return output;
}
share|improve this question
    
The last non-8bits buffer will be converted in its ascii value and the value is concatenate to the output. – Pier-Alexandre Bouchard Jan 24 '12 at 15:53
up vote 7 down vote accepted
  1. Use StringBuilder initialized with expected capacity for output:

    StringBuilder out = new StringBuilder(bits.size() / 8 + 1);
    
  2. Use bitwise operations instead of parseInt(), something like this:

    int i = 0;          
    int c = 0;
    for(Boolean b: bits){
        if (i > 0 && i % 8 == 0){
            out.append((char) c);
            c = 0;
        }
        c = (c << 1) | (b ? 1 : 0);
        i++;
    }
    out.append((char) c); // Not sure about the desired behaviour here
    
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, the demo file I compressed with my code took more than 1 minute and yours take less than 1 second. I just don't understand why you do i%8 !=1. the modulo could be 2, 3, 4.. ? the code inside must append the non-8 bits char value in the string builder. – Pier-Alexandre Bouchard Jan 24 '12 at 16:24
    
@Pier-alexandreBouchard: Yes, this code contains an off-by-one error, wait a minute. – axtavt Jan 24 '12 at 16:28
    
@Pier-alexandreBouchard: Seems to be fine now. – axtavt Jan 24 '12 at 16:31
    
I make a couple of tests, but It seems to be okay. – Pier-Alexandre Bouchard Jan 24 '12 at 16:35
    
I humbly believe my code below is even more efficient as it does not use StringBuilder. – DejanLekic Jan 24 '12 at 16:41

These suggestions will give you enough performance still keeping the code simple and readable. First test using these changes and if doesn't meet your performance requirements then slowly introduce optimization techniques suggested in other answers

  1. Use BitSet instead of LinkedList<Boolean>
  2. use StringBuilder output; instead of String output;
  3. use StringBuilder buffer; instead of String buffer;
  4. Use Integer.valueOf() instead of Integer.parseInt. valueOf uses cache for values below 128 i think.
share|improve this answer
    
@beny23 the OP is creating integer out of string for which he can use valueOf – Pangea Jan 24 '12 at 16:06
    
so it is... I hadnt realised that there was a string version of valueOf... – beny23 Jan 24 '12 at 20:11

String concatenation is slow especially for large lists (since strings are immutable they have to be copied around which takes some time and each copy requires more space as well). Use a StringBuilder instead of a String to append to. In other words: buffer and output should be StringBuilder instances.

share|improve this answer

As others suggested - use BitSet. For the rest, I think the method below is pretty efficient:

    public String toString() {
        char[] bytes = new char[bits.size() / 8 + ((bits.size() % 8 > 0) ? 1 : 0)];
        int bitCounter = 0;
        int word = 0;
        int byteCounter = 0;
        for (boolean b : bits) {
            word = (word << 1) | (b ? 1 : 0);
            if (bitCounter == 7) {
                bytes[byteCounter] = (char) word;
                ++byteCounter;
                bitCounter = 0;
                word = 0;
            } else {
                ++bitCounter;
            } // else
        } // foreach
        bytes[byteCounter] = (char) word;
        return new String(bytes);
    } // toString() method

Here is possibly a better alternative that does not use byte counter:

        public String toString() {
            int size = bits.size() / 8 + ((bits.size() % 8 > 0) ? 1 : 0);
            if (size == 0) {
                return "";
            } // if
            char[] bytes = new char[size];
            int bitCounter = 0;
            int word = 0;
            for (boolean b : bits) {
                if (bitCounter % 8 == 0
                        && bitCounter > 0) {
                    bytes[(bitCounter - 1) / 8] = (char) word;
                    word = 0;
                } // if
                word = (word << 1) | (b ? 1 : 0);
                ++bitCounter;
            } // foreach
            bytes[size - 1] = (char) word;
            return new String(bytes);
        } // toString() method
share|improve this answer

Try to keep buffer as an int. I mean

 buffer = buffer << 1 + (((Boolean)it.next() == false) ? 0 : 1);

instead of

 buffer += ((Boolean)it.next() == false) ? "0" : "1";

Also use StringBuilder for output. This is a small change here but always a bit.

share|improve this answer
    
I humbly suggest you use buffer * 2 in the first code sample or buffer = (buffer << 1) | ((Boolean)it.next() ? 1 : 0);. Within one expression, better don't mix arithmetic and bit manipulation, even if they do the same. – Daniel Fischer Jan 24 '12 at 19:52

Try the following:

 StringBuilder b = new StringBuilder();
 int ch = 0;
 int n = 0;

 for (Boolean bit : bits) {
   ch <<= 1;
   if (bit) {
     ch++;
   }
   if (++n == 8) {
     b.append((char)ch);
     n = 0;
     ch = 0;
   }
 }

 if (n > 0) {
   b.append((char)ch);
 }  

 System.out.println(b.toString());
share|improve this answer

Use StringBuffer or stringBuilder instead of String for your buffer and output vars.

String vars are immutable, so every operations creates a new instance in heap, while StringBuilder and StringBuffer are not.

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