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Suppose I'm creating a session class, with relevant implementation as below:

public class Session()
{
    private $id;
    private $user;
}

The $user field contains an object of type User if the session is logged in, and is null if the session is not logged in to the site. The $id is the session id.

Suppose I now want to find out whether or not the user is logged in. Obviously I could check to see if $user is null, if it is then the user isn't logged in - something like this:

public class Session()
{
    private $id;
    private $user;

    public function isLoggedIn()
    {
        return !is_null($user);
    }
}

Alternatively, I could store a boolean session variable, $loggedIn or something, set to false on log in and otherwise initialised in the constructor to be false to test against instead:

public class Session()
{
    private $id;
    private $user;
    private $loggedIn;

    public function isLoggedIn()
    {
        return $loggedIn;
    }
}

Would one approach produce better performance than the other here? If so, which, and why? Alternatively, is one approach preferable to the other for any reason unrelated to performance?

share|improve this question
7  
It's not really a big enough difference to matter, but if you want to know, why not write a simple benchmark? Try both methods and run the check a few thousand times and see which is faster. – Michael Mior Jan 24 '12 at 16:04
1  
You simply shouldn't need to worry about that. If your app depends on this sort of microoptimization, something is wrong elsewhere! – Eugen Rieck Jan 24 '12 at 16:06
    
Why don't you just evaluate $user as a boolean? Unless 0 or an empty string is a valid value for this field (which I doubt) this would do the job. But as @MichaelMior rightly says, this won't make enough of a difference to be worth worrying about, and you should write it in the way that you will best understand it when you come back to modify the code later. – DaveRandom Jan 24 '12 at 16:07
1  
Looks like boolean is quicker, but still negligible. ideone.com/WoNAL – Ben Everard Jan 24 '12 at 16:09
    
I understand the curiosity, despite whether or not the performance gains are negligible. However, that negligible measurement is why it's hard to find any factual data to answer the question. One can theorize that is_null returns true/false based on a single condition while a boolean must evaluate the expression and determine the boolean response or translate it to a boolean response, suggesting the latter requires more processing time. Just a thought... – mchandler Jan 24 '12 at 16:10
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Simpler is better. If you introduce a new variable to track whether or not $user is null, then you also introduce the possibility that is_null($user) and $loggedIn don't match. Avoiding the hassle of having to worry about that is worth much more than any possible micro-optimization you may gain in performance.

share|improve this answer
    
This was my thinking really, I guessed that a straight boolean would probably be faster but didn't really want to do it given that it'd add unnecessary extra code in. Hadn't even thought about the possibility of the two getting out of sync, though. Thanks. – Hecksa Jan 24 '12 at 16:28

Checking php.net for a benchmark at this user contributed post (link to post) we see that == and === are much faster than is_null.

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I'd say the best way to do this would be:

return ($user !== null)

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I think though that the compiler will produce the same op_code for !is_null($user) and $user !== null. Would make sense... – Mathieu Dumoulin Jan 24 '12 at 16:07
    
@MathieuDumoulin is_null() is a function and not a language construct, so I don't think this is the case. I could be wrong though. – DaveRandom Jan 24 '12 at 16:09
1  
That won't always work!! even if now I can't find my code for that, I encounter this very problems a few days ago, when I spent nearly 2 hours trying to figure it out. They where arrays elements that were set NULL, but on that test it returned they were not. I know that I have used false and (===) to make it work. – khael Jan 24 '12 at 16:09
    
I don't see how that wouldn't work with arrays. $test = array(1, 2, null); var_dump($test[2] === null); outputs true. – user215361 Jan 24 '12 at 16:15
1  
@khael you might have used ISSET on array elements that could be null. ISSET doesn't check if an array element exists but instead checks if a value is null or not and doesn't instanciate it. For example, not declaring $i = 0; and just doing isset($i) returns false because $i will get instanciated with the value NULL. Same thing for array entries. ISSET($array['something']) is a bad practice if your values of arrays can contains NULLS... :) – Mathieu Dumoulin Jan 24 '12 at 16:17

The fastest method would be isset():

public function isLoggedIn() {
    return isset($this->user);
}

The isset() function returns TRUE if the variable is set (exists) and is not NULL, or FALSE otherwise.

It's much faster than !is_null() and !empty(), and marginally faster than !== NULL, both when the value is NULL, as well as when it is not NULL.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, I'll probably switch that one in instead, then. Thanks for the further info there. – Hecksa Jan 24 '12 at 19:57

You actually can solve your issue with a cast to bool:

public function isLoggedIn()
{
    return (bool) $this->user;
}

Every object is TRUE, and NULL is FALSE in PHP.

Your original question about "what is faster" does normally not play any significant role. What's more important is that you can easily read your code which includes not writing needless code, especially not because you guess something might be faster when the moon is in a specific phase.

You don't know the two important things: Is my code too slow? Which one is faster?. If you can't answer the first question at all, well then don't even think about asking the second.

You're only putting something in your brain that you will never use. That's a common mistake inexperienced programmers do, so the earlier you stop with that, the faster you'll get results you can work with. And the more easy you keep your code from the beginning, into the less bottlenecks you will run. And those you'll run into won't be a problem for you because there is not much to change to remove performance hogs. Sounds fair?

share|improve this answer
    
The main reason I asked was to avoid picking a method that turned out to be a big mistake (for whatever reason - performance or otherwise) while I still had the chance. If I'd known that the difference was so minimal I'd not have needed to ask it. That said, I do see your point, and I certainly don't want to waste any time bothering about small things like this when there's plenty of other more important things to worry about. – Hecksa Jan 25 '12 at 14:46
    
@Hecksa: Okay, regarding the method, it's good to have one. Use so called Docblock comments to document what it does and it's return types. Also choose a good name, probably $session->hasUser() might be more clear. – hakre Jan 25 '12 at 15:26

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