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I often find myself doing inefficient loops as such:

def __add__(self, other):
    dimensions = []
    for i in range(max(self.numberOfDimensions, other.numberOfDimensions)):
        a = None    
        if i < self.numberOfDimensions:
            a = self[i]     
        b = None    
        if i < other.numberOfDimensions:
            b = other[i]    

        # Doesn't actually do the right thing here.
        dimensions.append(sum(map(lambda x: ((x is None) and 1 or 2) - 1, (a, b))))

    return self.__class__(dimensions)

The calculation is simple, it's just handling the if statements types that's getting me. By the way, this is a subclass of tuple in which the add operator adds similar index's values like so (1, 2, 3) + (4, 5, 6, 7) == (5, 7, 9, 7). I would think that filter() would help me out on this but I'm not sure how I'd implement it.

EDIT: This is for Python 3.

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Are you sure the line dimensions.append(sum(map(lambda x: ((x is None) and 1 or 2) - 1, (a, b)))) does what you think it does? It's a rather strange way of writing dimensions.append(a is not None + b is not None), which is already strange enough. –  Sven Marnach Jan 24 '12 at 16:46
    
Quick check, does this fall under premature optimization? It is easy for you, and others, to understand this for loop. Is it actually causing large slowdowns in your program, and if so, do you care? If it triples the runtime from 50 nanoseconds to 150 nanoseconds, you won't even notice. –  Spencer Rathbun Jan 24 '12 at 16:48
    
@SpencerRathbun: It is definitely not easy to understand this code, as demonstrated as a bunch of answers doing a diversity of different things. –  Sven Marnach Jan 24 '12 at 16:50
    
@Spencer, possibly. I don't know who will be using the class and what it will be used for. I'm about to run some benchmarks to test the differences. –  Tyler Crompton Jan 24 '12 at 16:52
    
@SvenMarnach, my mistake, you are right. That's something I overlooked. I never finished the definition of the function as you can see there is no return statement. –  Tyler Crompton Jan 24 '12 at 16:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The most concise way to do this is

map(sum, itertools.izip_longest(self, other, fillvalue=0))

or

itertools.starmap(operator.add, 
                  itertools.izip_longest(self, other, fillvalue=0))

This does what I guess your original code is supposed to do. If you are using Python 3, convert the result to a tuple or list or whatever you want it to be.

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On the other hand, a short and simple statement makes it more clear! –  Spencer Rathbun Jan 24 '12 at 16:56
    
I don't have a Python 3 interpreter on hand. Is this in Python 3? After a quick search in the docs, I can't find it. –  Tyler Crompton Jan 24 '12 at 16:57
    
@TylerCrompton: izip_longest was introduced in Python 2.6. What version are you using? –  Sven Marnach Jan 24 '12 at 17:04
    
TypeError: op_add expected 2 arguments, got 1 I solved this with the sum() function instead of operator.add(). –  Tyler Crompton Jan 24 '12 at 17:28
    
@TylerCrompton: Sorry, fixed now. –  Sven Marnach Jan 24 '12 at 17:36

I'm not sure if I'm totally getting it, but I think the stdlib is your friend:

from itertools import izip_longest
dimensions = []
for a, b in izip_longest(self, other, fillvalue=0):
    dimensions.append(a + b)

I don't think a list comprehension would be very clean.

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1  
I think this is what the OP wants, though it isn't what the original code does. –  Sven Marnach Jan 24 '12 at 16:48
    
I don't have a Python 3 interpreter on hand. Is this in Python 3? After a quick search in the docs, I can't find it. –  Tyler Crompton Jan 24 '12 at 16:57
1  
My answer was for 2.7, although it's also in python3 as itertools.zip_longest(). Here's the docs for 2.7 for the curious. –  AdamKG Jan 24 '12 at 16:58

Here's the trivial way to use list comprehension, though it's pretty ugly IMHO.

dimensions = [
  sum(map(lambda x: ((x is None) and 1 or 2) - 1, (
    self[i] if i<self.numberOfDimensions else None,
    other[i] if i<other.numberOfDimensions else None
  )))

  for i in range(max(self.numberOfDimensions, other.numberOfDimensions))  
]
share|improve this answer
    
"Readability counts" indeed. I agree it's ugly, +1 though. –  Savino Sguera Jan 24 '12 at 16:48
    
Using Python 3. –  Tyler Crompton Jan 24 '12 at 16:54
    
@TylerCrompton this should work on 2.6 and above, shouldn't it? –  Dor Shemer Jan 24 '12 at 16:55
    
Python 3 doesn't have xrange(). Python 3's range() is basically equivalent to Python 2's xrange(). from what I understand. –  Tyler Crompton Jan 24 '12 at 16:59
    
@TylerCrompton my bad –  Dor Shemer Jan 24 '12 at 16:59

how about this although untested:

dimensions = [sum(map(lambda x: ((x is None) and 1 or 2) - 1, (self[i] if i < self.numberOfDimensions else None, other[i] if i < other.numberOfDimensions else None))) for i in range(max(self.numberOfDimensions, other.numberOfDimensions))]
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I think the missing piece you need is:

(a,b) = (self[i] if i < self.numberOfDimensions else None, other[i] if i < other.numberOfDimensions else None)

Of course, I'm not convinced that a single expression will be more readable. You might be better off using some kind of map to generate the (a,b)s first.

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