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Is there a difference between this:

$(document).ready(function() {

and this:

$().ready(function() {

Thank you.

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3  
has already been answered: stackoverflow.com/questions/1388043/… –  Max Jan 24 '12 at 16:47
    
ready() is for amateurs. Just $( function () { ... } );... –  Šime Vidas Jan 24 '12 at 16:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

according to jquery documentation they are the same.

All three of the following syntaxes are equivalent:

$(document).ready(handler)
$().ready(handler) // this is not recommended
$(handler)

i personally feel using $(document).ready(handler) makes it more readable though.

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+1 - didn't know about #2 (even though it's not recommended) –  Adam Rackis Jan 24 '12 at 16:51

They both are equivalent but the later one is not recommended per jQuery docs.

http://api.jquery.com/ready/

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If I am not completely mistake, the first one is what you wanna use in any case (when using non-intrusive JS). The second one might even work (not tested) but if it does it will certainly be slower, as jQuery would have to detect the object that is loaded and upon which to run the denoted functon.

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Yes, indeed, speedwise you want to use the first, since the funcion will be appended (executed) immediately upon document.load(). –  Evenflow Jan 24 '12 at 16:51

First, it has nothing to do with PHP, that's javascript code (using the jQuery library). I retagged your question accordingly.

Now, these 3 variants do the same thing (attach an event handler to the DOMLoaded event):

$(function(){});
$(document).ready(function(){});
$().ready(function(){});

The third one is not recommended, according to jQuery docs.

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