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I have a string str = "$ 9.0 / hr" or str = "$9.0/hr". I only want the integer value from this in this case 9.0

Language is Ruby 1.9.2

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Will negative values ever show up? Do values less than 1.0 have a leading zero or not? Will the values ever use scientific notation? –  Phrogz Jan 24 '12 at 16:58
3  
Strictly, 9.0 isn't an integer; it's a float. –  Sony Santos Jan 24 '12 at 17:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'd use:

number = str[ /\d*(?:\.\d+)?/ ]

Or, if a leading 0 is required for values less than 1.0,

number = str[ /\d+(?:\.\d+)?/ ]

If you might have other numbers in the string, and only want the (first) one that has a dollar sign before it:

number = str[ /\$\s*(\d+(?:\.\d+)?)/, 1 ]

If it's guaranteed that there will (must) be a decimal place and digit(s) thereafter:

number = str[ /\$\s*(\d+\.\d+)/, 1 ]

Hopefully you can mix and match some of these solutions to get what you need.

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I used the second one ` str[ /\d+(?:\.\d+)?/ ]`. Thank you! –  Bhushan Lodha Jan 24 '12 at 17:51

If your prices always have dollars.cents format (which is likely for prices) then use this regex:

"$ 9.0 / hr".match(/\d+\.\d+/)[0] # => 9.0
"$9.0/hr".match(/\d+\.\d+/)[0] # => 9.0

Else you should take regex from Phrogz answer.

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This requires the values to always have one decimal place; is that going to be true? –  Phrogz Jan 24 '12 at 16:59
    
@Pgrogz, yes, this is possible for prices, let's see what answer fits better for Bhushan's case. –  Alex Kliuchnikau Jan 24 '12 at 17:08

No regex :

str.delete("^0-9.")
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great solution! –  shicholas Apr 8 '14 at 21:47

I don't know ruby, but the regex should be \d+(?:\.\d+)?. This will also work with "$9/hr"

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