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The following R script generates a bar that is too tall to fit in the plot. Note that the bar goes beyond the y axis and its annotation (percentage) is not shown. How can I generate a bar plot that shows the whole tall bar and its annotation?

png(filename = "plot.png")
x <- c("A", "B")
y <- c(2e6 + 10, 400)
sum_Y <- sum(y)
midpoints <- barplot(height = y, log = "y")
text(midpoints, y, sprintf("%.2f%%", y / sum_Y * 100), pos = 3)
dev.off()

a bar plot with a tall bar

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could do it in ggplot2:

library(ggplot2)
qplot(x,y,geom="bar",log="y") + geom_text(aes(y=y*1.5, label=sprintf("%.2f%%", y / sum_Y * 100)))

enter image description here

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Thanks for your prompt response. The label of your y-axis is too close to the labels of the y-axis. I'm not familiar with ggplot2. How would you change the margins in ggplot2? I'd prefer plain R plots for I'm more familiar with them. –  reprogrammer Jan 24 '12 at 17:58
    
Your plot isn't log-scaled, is it? –  reprogrammer Jan 24 '12 at 18:00
1  
@reprogrammer Didn't notice the log scale, I've edited it now to include that. It's well worth the effort to learn ggplot2. This post is quite an interesting example, and shows how to modify margins: learnr.wordpress.com/2009/04/23/… –  James Jan 24 '12 at 18:08
1  
@reprogrammer: Try to explore this and this for information to make changes for plot labels. –  MYaseen208 Jan 24 '12 at 18:12
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png(filename = "plot.png")
x <- c("A", "B")
y <- c(2e6 + 10, 400)
sum_Y <- sum(y)
midpoints <- barplot(height = y, log = "y", ylim=c(5e1,5e6))
text(midpoints, y, sprintf("%.2f%%", y / sum_Y * 100), pos = 3)
dev.off()

R is rather picky about what it will accept as limits for its log scales.

enter image description here

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I suggest that you change ylim to c(1,5e6). –  reprogrammer Jan 24 '12 at 18:33
    
Sorry. I don't see the point. –  BondedDust Jan 25 '12 at 5:21
    
Just to be consistent with the lower bound in my original plot. –  reprogrammer Jan 25 '12 at 5:25
    
But the lower bound on your plot was not specified and the default settings picked 5e2??? And the results look quite different on my png output. So I still do not see your point. –  BondedDust Jan 25 '12 at 14:06
    
The label "5e+02" in my plot is the first tick mark not the lower bound. Similarly, "1e+02" is the first tick mark of your plot not its lower bound. –  reprogrammer Jan 25 '12 at 15:17
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Another option (based on @Dwin ylab adjustment) is to use plotrix package. If you want to play more with the log scale labels, check height.at and height.lab option in barp:

require(plotrix)
png(filename = "plot.png")
x <- c("A", "B")
y <- c(2e6 + 10, 400)
sum_Y <- sum(y)
midpoints <- barp(height = y, ylog = T, ylim=c(1,5e6))
text(y, sprintf("%.2f%%", y / sum_Y * 100), pos = 3)
dev.off()

enter image description here

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What is the advantage of using plotrix to @DWin's answer? –  reprogrammer Jan 24 '12 at 19:13
    
I suggest that you change ylim to c(1, 5e6). I'm OK with increasing the upper bound but not changing the lower bound. –  reprogrammer Jan 24 '12 at 19:14
    
I would say it's a cosmetic advantage. As plotrix manual points out: the ylog argument produces a log scale on the y axis. Currently, neither pretty nor axTicks seems to produce a nice set of axis ticks, so it is best to pass the positions of these in height.at. I don't think you got that flexibility with standard barplot. –  Geek On Acid Jan 24 '12 at 19:29
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