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I'm trying to set up access to a gitolite-managed git server from an OS X machine with home directory mounted by AFS. Unix permissions are ignored by AFS, and based on my understanding of the problem, there is an OS X permission-faking fix in AFS that sets all permissions to 666 so that Finder can still open files locally.

When you try to authenticate to the git server you get

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ 
@         WARNING: UNPROTECTED PRIVATE KEY FILE!          @ 
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ 
Permissions 0666 for '$HOME/.ssh/id_dsa' are too open

because ssh thinks the private key is too visible (it's not since permissions are actually managed by AFS ACLs). chmod has no effect on the local unix permissions.

Here's a Nabble thread about the problem I found that wasn't much help:

http://old.nabble.com/User-friendly-Mac-OS-X-patch-causes-SSH-hardship-tt8851573.html#a8851573

Does anyone know a work around? Is there anyway to fake the permissions of .ssh to something like 700?

share|improve this question
    
Ahhh, good ol' AFS (I used to work on AFS back when it first got started at Universities close to 20 years ago). Anyways, can you create a symbolic link from .ssh in your AFS directory back to some directory on your local machine? You definitely do not want to have private keys available to anyone but your authenticated, tokened self on AFS. –  Michael Dautermann Jan 25 '12 at 1:15
    
Hey Michael, thanks for your comment. I'm at CMU, where AFS is basically part of the architecture. And by that, I mean not just the system architecture, but the physical architecture. I'm pretty sure buildings would fall down without it. Unfortunately, creating a symbolic link wouldn't help, since the symbolic link itself would have permissions 666, even if the actual private key was somewhere safe. –  Justin C Jan 25 '12 at 1:46

1 Answer 1

You could try modifying your /etc/ssh_config file to use a specified identity file. Inserting something like this, perhaps:

Host <gitolite-server-host>
  IdentityFile <identity-file-location> # this defaults to your ~/.ssh/id_rsa
  User <gitolite-username>
share|improve this answer
    
This does assume you're just trying to connect from one machine –  Guy Jul 25 '12 at 9:16

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