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SWIG seems to be generating incorrect bindings for converting a struct field of type map, resulting in a TypeError trying to set the map field to a python dictionary. Is there an error I am missing? an unsupported use-case? a bug in SWIG?

First the output

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File ".\use_test.py", line 4, in <module>
    struct.data = { 'A':1, 'B':2 }
  File "C:\Users\kmahan\Projects\SwigTest\test.py", line 150, in <lambda>
    __setattr__ = lambda self, name, value: _swig_setattr(self, MyStruct, name, value)
  File "C:\Users\kmahan\Projects\SwigTest\test.py", line 49, in _swig_setattr
    return _swig_setattr_nondynamic(self,class_type,name,value,0)
  File "C:\Users\kmahan\Projects\SwigTest\test.py", line 42, in _swig_setattr_nondynamic
    if method: return method(self,value)
TypeError: in method 'MyStruct_data_set', argument 2 of type 'std::map< std::string,unsigned int,std::less< std::string >,std::allocator< std::pair< std::string const,unsigned int > > > *'

And here is my test case:

test.i

%module test

%include "std_string.i"
%include "std_map.i"

namespace std {
    %template(StringIntMap) map<string, unsigned int>;
}

%{
#include "test.h"
%}

%include "test.h"

test.h

#ifndef _TEST_H_
#define _TEST_H_

#include <string>
#include <map>

struct MyStruct 
{
    std::map<std::string, unsigned int> data;
};

#endif //_TEST_H_

test.cpp

#include "test.h"

run_test.py

import test

struct = test.MyStruct()
struct.data = { 'A':1, 'B':2 }

print struct.data

I build test_wrapper.cpp with swig -python -c++ -o test_wrapper.cpp test.i, compile everything else, and run run_test.py.

As a workaround I can explicitly define a setter instead ( void setData(const map<string, unsigned int>& data) ) which generates different conversion code -- it goes through traits_asptr instead of SWIG_ConvertPtr -- and seems to work but is not very pythonic!

EDIT

Here is my .i file that pipes gets and sets of the attribute itself to C++ getters and setters. I think this is what Nathan suggested in the comment below his answer.

%module test

%include "std_string.i"
%include "std_map.i"

namespace std {
    %template(StringIntMap) map<string, unsigned int>;
}

struct MyStruct 
{
    const std::map<std::string, unsigned int>& getData() const;
    void setData(const std::map<std::string, unsigned int>&);

    %pythoncode %{
        __swig_getmethods__["data"] = getData
        __swig_setmethods__["data"] = setData
        if _newclass:
            data = _swig_property(getData, setData)
    %}
};
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you're setting struct.data, it's expecting a test.StringIntMap, not a python dict.

The easiest thing is for you to do this:

struct.data = test.StringIntMap({ 'A':1, 'B':2 })
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer, I can confirm that your suggestion works. Do you know why SWIG does the implicit conversion from StringIntMap <-> dict for parameters to the setter method but not for the value of a field? I would expect the data= "method" to be more or less equivalent to the setData() method. –  kyle_wm Jan 24 '12 at 20:40
    
I think that it's basically because python and C++ have fundamentally different ideas about =. In python the = operator simply overwrites the current value of something whereas in C++, you call operator= on that object. std_map.i makes std::map behave as much like a dict as possible, but it doesn't make other objects do something fancy with setattr. You could always subclass (or monkeypatch) struct add a property sett that will automatically do what you're asking for. –  Nathan Binkert Jan 24 '12 at 21:22
    
Ahh, that makes sense more or less. Not familiar with the term monkeypatch, but I think that is what I ended up doing -- added an edit at the end of my post. Thanks for your help. –  kyle_wm Jan 24 '12 at 21:42

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