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Given data such as : user, library ID, book ID, year

1,10, 100,2000
2,10, 100,2000
3,10, 100,2000

2,10, 200,2000
3,10, 200,2000
1,10, 200,2000

I tried storing them using TreeMap but the second group overwrite the first , any suggestions ?

    TreeMap<Integer, Integer> bookMap = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();
    TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, Integer>> libraryMap = new TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, Integer>>();
    TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, Integer>>> UserMap = new TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, Integer>>>();

    bookMap.put(100, 2000);
    libraryMap.put(10,bookMap);     
    UserMap.put(1,libraryMap);
    UserMap.put(2,libraryMap);
    UserMap.put(3,libraryMap);

    bookMap = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>(); 
    bookMap.put(200, 2000);
    libraryMap = new TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, Integer>>();
    libraryMap.put(10,bookMap);
    UserMap.put(1,libraryMap);
    UserMap.put(2,libraryMap);
    UserMap.put(3,libraryMap);

Solution #1 still using maps only, but I think this solution will take long time and consume more memory ?

TreeMap<Integer, Integer> bookMap = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();
        TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, Integer>> libraryMap = new TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, Integer>>();
        TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, Integer>>> UserMap = new TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, Integer>>>();

        bookMap.put(100, 2000);
        bookMap.put(300, 2003);
        libraryMap.put(10,bookMap);     
        UserMap.put(1,libraryMap);
        UserMap.put(2,libraryMap);
        UserMap.put(3,libraryMap);

        int userID = 1;
        int libraryID =10;
        if (UserMap.containsKey(userID))
        {           
             if ( UserMap.get(userID).containsKey(libraryID))
             {
                 TreeMap<Integer, Integer> storedBookMap = UserMap.get(userID).get(libraryID);
                 bookMap= new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();

                 bookMap.putAll(storedBookMap);
                 bookMap.put(200, 2000);

                 libraryMap = new TreeMap<Integer, TreeMap<Integer, Integer>>();
                 libraryMap.put(libraryID,bookMap); 

                 UserMap.put(userID,libraryMap);
             }
        }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

every user can have more than one book, but when you do:

UserMap.put(1,libraryMap);

you overwrite whatever was in the UserMap under the key 1. so you should make the UserMap of type TreeMap<Integer,ArrayList<whatever>> and add data to the list.

also, there's no sense in nesting the maps. each entity in you program (user/book/library) has an id, so i would suggest keeping a single map for each type of entity and using ids for reference. i.e:

TreeMap<Integer, Integer> bookMap = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();    
TreeMap<Integer, ArrayList<Integer>> userMap = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>();

// for each line
  // read line and assign appropriate values to uid, libid, bid, year

  if (bookMap.get(bid) == null)
    bookMap.put(bid,year);

  if (userMap.get(uid) == null))
    userMap.put(uid, new ArrayList<Integer>());
  userMap.get(uid).add(bid);

now if you want to know which books user 1 has, you do something like:

for (Integer i: userMap.get(1))
  System.out.println(i+","+bookMap.get(i))
share|improve this answer
    
The data is stored sequentially as the example above , so I need to read them line by line and add/put. I also need to add the library Id which was 10 in this case –  tnaser Jan 24 '12 at 19:16
    
the answer to your original question still holds (use a list, you need to keep several values per user). i've updated the 2nd part of the answer to handle reading the data line by line. library ID should be handled similarly, try to figure it out. –  yurib Jan 24 '12 at 19:26
    
Can you please check the updates solution#1 ? will it take more time and memory to run it than using lists? –  tnaser Jan 24 '12 at 20:19
    
would i like to check the solution that you yourself think isn't good and completely ignores everything i suggested so far ? no thank you. –  yurib Jan 24 '12 at 23:04
    
No hard feelings please , I am new to maps and lists ad still practicing. Thanks –  tnaser Jan 25 '12 at 1:16

If you have the luxury of using arbitrary code, consider using one of the Multimap collections, which handle the problem you're trying to solve much more nicely than a raw Map>

http://commons.apache.org/collections/api-3.1/org/apache/commons/collections/MultiMap.html

http://google-collections.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/javadoc/com/google/common/collect/Multimap.html

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Would it make a difference in performance ? –  tnaser Jan 24 '12 at 20:29
    
Actually, I would use Table here, not Multimap. –  Louis Wasserman Jan 24 '12 at 20:53
    
It's behind the scenes just proxying your call to a Map&gt;K, Collection&gt;V&lt;&lt; so the overhead is basically one more function call, which is minimal - but it gives a cleaner interface. Simply map.put(key, value); vs. if (!map.containsKey(key)) { map.put(key, new ArrayList())}; map.get(key).add(value); –  James Jan 24 '12 at 20:54
    
@LouisWasserman - I'd missed that there were a couple of use cases there (serves me right for not looking past the first line) –  James Jan 24 '12 at 20:55

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